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Director Of National Intelligence

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010
9 tonight CHANNEL 10 The CDC tries to identify the contagion as the biological threat intensifies. The director of national intelligence (Zeljko Ivanek, right) faces a difficult dilemma during negotiations. The FBI closes in on Vicky and Carter (Taylor Cole, D.B. Sweeney).
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
WASHINGTON - National Intelligence Director Dennis C. Blair announced his resignation yesterday after a rocky 16-month tenure during which he found himself on the losing end of turf battles and struggled to develop a close relationship with President Obama. One senior official said yesterday that the retired admiral had been forced out. After a series of attempted terror attacks and intelligence breakdowns that included the 13 shooting deaths last year at Fort Hood, Texas, and the failed Christmas Day airline-bombing attempt, Obama's confidence in Blair waned, several officials said.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
YOUR March 3 editorial ("Don't Hang Up on Our Privacy Rights") mischaracterizes the FISA legislation that recently passed the Senate by a strong bipartisan 68-29 vote. The editorial says, "Without immunity, the telecom companies weren't cooperating. This turned out not to be true. Caught once again in a lie, the administration backed off. " This is simply not accurate. In a Feb. 22 letter, the attorney general and the Director of National Intelligence informed the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee that, for six days after the expiration of the Protect America Act, the intelligence community lost information since some telecoms delayed or refused compliance with requests to initiate new surveillance of terrorist targets.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly approved a bill Friday spelling out policy for the nation's spy agencies, rejecting White House requests that would have expanded an intelligence community that has grown exponentially since Sept. 11, 2001. The vote was 384-14, with lawmakers praising the work of the CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency, and other government entities in the decade since the terror attacks. With Sunday's 10th anniversary at hand, "we're reminded of the need for a strong, effective intelligence community to ensure that such a tragedy never happens again," said Rep. Tom Rooney (R., Fla.)
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - America's top two intelligence officials said Tuesday that al-Qaeda is weaker and U.S. intelligence agencies are smarter since the 9/11 attacks - but the terrorists are nowhere near giving up. In his first week on the job, CIA Director David H. Petraeus told members of Congress that al-Qaeda's recent losses of Osama bin Laden and others had opened "an important window of vulnerability. " Petraeus predicted that al-Qaeda leaders may even leave South Asia altogether to escape the CIA, which has quadrupled covert drone strikes against al-Qaeda under the Obama administration.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | By Tim Weiner, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The chairmen of the Senate and House intelligence committees yesterday proposed a massive overhaul of the ways in which the United States spies on the world. Calling for the most sweeping changes in U.S. intelligence since the CIA was created in 1947, the chairmen said the present jumble of 12 intelligence services should be revamped into one three-pronged, 21st-century organization including: A global eavesdropping enterprise gathering data with spy satellites and electronic devices.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Larry Margasak, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Two hours after the U.S. Consulate came under attack in Benghazi, Libya, the White House was told that a militant group was claiming responsibility for the violence that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. A State Department e-mail sent to intelligence officials and the White House situation room said the Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia claimed responsibility on Facebook and Twitter, and also called for an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli. The document may fuel Republican efforts to show that the White House knew it was a terrorist attack, even as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations was saying - five days afterward - that it appeared to be a protest gone awry.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Choose one .
It's become a cliché of presidential debates: Facing any question about Afghanistan or other national security issues, the candidates declare that they would heed the advice of their "commanders in the field. " It is striking, then, how willing they are to dismiss outright the opinions of America's national security professionals when it comes to Iran. At a recent conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the Republican candidates played a game of rhetorical one-upmanship in expressing their willingness to take America to war in Iran.
NEWS
March 5, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Pols back court decision keeping BBC off campaign-finance case LONDON - Senior government officials rallied yesterday to support a High Court ruling forbidding the BBC, Britain's public service broadcaster, from transmitting news about accusations of campaign-finance improprieties that are under investigation by the police. But the BBC nudged its reporting a little further forward, saying the report it had planned to broadcast related to an e-mail message between two close confidants of Prime Minister Tony Blair.
NEWS
November 21, 2004 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
House Republicans yesterday scuttled a bipartisan effort to transform the nation's intelligence community in response to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, casting doubt on whether Congress will approve any of the changes recommended last summer by the 9/11 investigating commission. House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R., Ill.) promised to continue to push for the legislation after the Thanksgiving holiday. But there appeared to be little room for additional compromise, and congressional aides said the new Congress, which takes office in January, was unlikely to consider the issue.
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NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Larry Margasak, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Two hours after the U.S. Consulate came under attack in Benghazi, Libya, the White House was told that a militant group was claiming responsibility for the violence that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans. A State Department e-mail sent to intelligence officials and the White House situation room said the Islamist group Ansar al-Sharia claimed responsibility on Facebook and Twitter, and also called for an attack on the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli. The document may fuel Republican efforts to show that the White House knew it was a terrorist attack, even as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations was saying - five days afterward - that it appeared to be a protest gone awry.
NEWS
March 20, 2012 | Choose one .
It's become a cliché of presidential debates: Facing any question about Afghanistan or other national security issues, the candidates declare that they would heed the advice of their "commanders in the field. " It is striking, then, how willing they are to dismiss outright the opinions of America's national security professionals when it comes to Iran. At a recent conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the Republican candidates played a game of rhetorical one-upmanship in expressing their willingness to take America to war in Iran.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By Kimberly Dozier, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - America's top two intelligence officials said Tuesday that al-Qaeda is weaker and U.S. intelligence agencies are smarter since the 9/11 attacks - but the terrorists are nowhere near giving up. In his first week on the job, CIA Director David H. Petraeus told members of Congress that al-Qaeda's recent losses of Osama bin Laden and others had opened "an important window of vulnerability. " Petraeus predicted that al-Qaeda leaders may even leave South Asia altogether to escape the CIA, which has quadrupled covert drone strikes against al-Qaeda under the Obama administration.
NEWS
September 10, 2011 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly approved a bill Friday spelling out policy for the nation's spy agencies, rejecting White House requests that would have expanded an intelligence community that has grown exponentially since Sept. 11, 2001. The vote was 384-14, with lawmakers praising the work of the CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency, and other government entities in the decade since the terror attacks. With Sunday's 10th anniversary at hand, "we're reminded of the need for a strong, effective intelligence community to ensure that such a tragedy never happens again," said Rep. Tom Rooney (R., Fla.)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2010
9 tonight CHANNEL 10 The CDC tries to identify the contagion as the biological threat intensifies. The director of national intelligence (Zeljko Ivanek, right) faces a difficult dilemma during negotiations. The FBI closes in on Vicky and Carter (Taylor Cole, D.B. Sweeney).
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | Chicago Tribune
WASHINGTON - National Intelligence Director Dennis C. Blair announced his resignation yesterday after a rocky 16-month tenure during which he found himself on the losing end of turf battles and struggled to develop a close relationship with President Obama. One senior official said yesterday that the retired admiral had been forced out. After a series of attempted terror attacks and intelligence breakdowns that included the 13 shooting deaths last year at Fort Hood, Texas, and the failed Christmas Day airline-bombing attempt, Obama's confidence in Blair waned, several officials said.
NEWS
February 1, 2010 | By Charles Krauthammer
The real scandal surrounding the failed Christmas airline bombing was not that a terrorist got on a plane - that can happen to any administration, as it surely did to the Bush administration - but what happened afterward, when Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab was captured and came under the full control of the U.S. government. After 50 minutes of questioning him, the Obama administration chose, reflexively and mindlessly, to give the chatty terrorist the right to remain silent. Which he immediately did, undoubtedly denying us crucial information about al-Qaeda in Yemen, which had trained, armed, and dispatched him. We have since learned that the decision to Mirandize Abdulmutallab had been made without the knowledge of or consultation with the secretary of defense, the secretary of homeland security, the director of the FBI, the director of the National Counterterrorism Center, or the director of national intelligence.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
YOUR March 3 editorial ("Don't Hang Up on Our Privacy Rights") mischaracterizes the FISA legislation that recently passed the Senate by a strong bipartisan 68-29 vote. The editorial says, "Without immunity, the telecom companies weren't cooperating. This turned out not to be true. Caught once again in a lie, the administration backed off. " This is simply not accurate. In a Feb. 22 letter, the attorney general and the Director of National Intelligence informed the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee that, for six days after the expiration of the Protect America Act, the intelligence community lost information since some telecoms delayed or refused compliance with requests to initiate new surveillance of terrorist targets.
NEWS
March 5, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Pols back court decision keeping BBC off campaign-finance case LONDON - Senior government officials rallied yesterday to support a High Court ruling forbidding the BBC, Britain's public service broadcaster, from transmitting news about accusations of campaign-finance improprieties that are under investigation by the police. But the BBC nudged its reporting a little further forward, saying the report it had planned to broadcast related to an e-mail message between two close confidants of Prime Minister Tony Blair.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | By Peter Brookes
"Forewarned, forearmed. " - Ben Franklin There has been no bigger whipping boy in the shadow of 9/11 than the U.S. intelligence community - and rightly so. Connecting the intel dots could have made a big difference in preventing the horrific attack. But while 9/11 was an intelligence failure of mammoth proportions, it isn't just by chance that there hasn't been another attack here since that infamous day. The intelligence community isn't perfect by any means (nor will it ever be)
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