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Dirty Laundry

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NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DEIRDRE HAMILL/ DAILY NEWS
Calling for a halt to violence and discrimination against Asians yesterday, Lithsamay Mounelasy (left) and Sakum Sup discuss Philadelphia racial problems with Jim Enright outside City Hall. About 25 youths with the Asian Americans United Summer Project staged the demonstration, setting up a clothesline to mock a stereotype of Asians as laundry workers. On the line, they hung T- shirts inscribed with dates and descriptions of violent acts against Asians in America.
NEWS
September 5, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She routinely bares all for the likes of Playboy and Penthouse, and, for $25 a month, Victoria Zdrok will share additional intimacies with viewers - courtesy of a shower-cam through her Web site. But yesterday, Zdrok, with degrees in law and psychology from Villanova and Hahnemann, respectively, clung tenaciously to her privacy in a failed bid to keep the dirty laundry of her divorce out of the public eye. In January 2001, Zdrok, 29, of Pompton Lakes, N.J., was sued by her ex-husband, Alexander Zdrok of Wayne, for failure to pay him a percentage of her modeling revenue, according to terms of a 1996 property settlement.
SPORTS
February 28, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
New York Giants wide receiver Amani Toomer and his wife of more than 4 years was postponed until today as both sides worked on a settlement that would avoid publicly airing more of the couple's dirty laundry. Toomer and wife Yola Dabrow-ski were set to square off in court yesterday in Jersey City, N.J., after he asked a county judge for an annulment because, among other claims, his wife refused to have children and underwent three abortions without his knowledge or consent. In a counterclaim, Dabrowski said she didn't want a family with Toomer because she didn't feel he would be there "emotionally or physically" for their child.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | By DAN RODRICKS
Does anyone here believe that Professor Anita Hill came forward with her story about Judge Clarence Thomas because it was the right thing to do? Or are we just a bunch of jaded jackals, as politically cynical and hard- bitten as those magnificent men who brought us Willie Horton? Maybe we're tired. Maybe we're sick of seeing fine public servants destroyed in fires they themselves kindled. We could still be suffering a kind of people's post- traumatic stress syndrome. It's possible we still haven't recovered from Vietnam, Watergate, Koreagate and Abscam, as well as the series of failed presidencies that led to the two terms of Ronald Reagan - and Iran-contra and the savings and loan mess and a gargantuan deficit that is smothering our future.
NEWS
August 19, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Perhaps it simply isn't possible to live in a glass house with dignity. Even when you're glamorous young pop stars like Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey, the stars of MTV's new "reality" series Newlyweds, which debuts at 10:30 tonight. The pair are still sporting traces of tans from their honeymoon in Fiji and already they appear to be candidates for Dr. Phil. The romance between Simpson and Lachey seems like a match dreamed up by the editors of Teen People. In fact, the couple exchanged phone numbers five years ago at an anniversary party for that magazine.
NEWS
December 24, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / VICKI VALERIO
All she wants for Christmas is . . . a train. University of Pennsylvania junior Aggie Sung of Princeton Junction, N.J., waited - annoyed - at 30th Street Station yesterday for her ride home, which was running late. Her bags are filled with gifts - and dirty laundry.
NEWS
January 19, 1999 | By Jon Stenzler and Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An escaped prisoner who police say had a penchant for leaving dirty laundry behind at the houses he burglarized was charged Saturday night in a string of break-ins in Camden County. Haddon Township police arrested Robert Lee Allen Jr., 30, of Camden, at 9:30 as he walked along Route 168 in Camden. The arrest ended a manhunt that lasted more than two hours and involved three police departments and the Camden County Sheriff's Office K-9 Unit. Allen was charged with burglarizing four homes in Haddon Township, and police said he admitted breaking into nine homes in Collingswood and Woodlynne.
NEWS
March 21, 2008
WHEN THE CRACK in a supporting column forced the closure of I-95 earlier this week, we cringed. Talk about hanging your dirty laundry, or rather, broken roads, out for the nation to see - and to swear over, as 180,000 cars a day would be forced to exit off the interstate and get diverted through Port Richmond. And with the increased traffic from a looming holiday weekend, our status as Coolville quickly could have changed to @#^& !-Town, as drivers cursed our slow-to-move bureaucracy and chaotic approach to traffic management.
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NEWS
March 8, 2016
JOHN BAER may have failed to note what happened with George McGovern in 1972 in his March 2 column. Coming into the convention with a plurality of primary delegates, but not a majority, the Democratic Party was not happy with the choices of Hubert Humphrey - whose divisive defense at the 1968 Democratic National Convention resulted in a police riot that permanently alienated a generation from the party - and George McGovern, the champion of a peace...
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS A PEOPLE, we generally believe that our national elected representatives are a bunch of doofuses. Last week, approval ratings for Congress hit a record low of 10 percent, which is pretty much zero, factoring out the doofuses themselves. The same pollsters, meanwhile, find that on policies such as drone strikes and secret surveillance, we're roughly two-thirds supportive. Thus arises a problem - we citizens are not permitted to know the extent of the drone and surveillance programs.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE STORIES told in Sarah Polley's family-secrets documentary "Stories We Tell" yield a trove of Too Much Information. Polley's the gifted actress-turned-director ("Away From Her") making the switch here to nonfiction, tracing her own lineage through the tangled relationships of a deceased mother she barely knew. Polley encourages relatives and friends to describe the late Diane Polley, a vivacious actress and casting agent, unhappily married (so we're told) to part-time stage actor Michael Polley.
NEWS
June 24, 2011
By Michael T. Dolan Under cover of darkness, with the shades drawn and the neighborhood fast asleep - save for a red fox making its rounds in search of prey - I went in search of myself. The Google home page stood starkly before me and, like an addict unable to resist the urge, I Googled myself. I was afraid of what I might find. But I was even more afraid of finding nothing. After all, my life was at stake. If Google couldn't find me, then my soul, my memories - even my very existence - were in doubt.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | Associated Press
GENEVA - A United Nations panel has urged Ireland to investigate allegations that for decades women and girls sent to work in Catholic laundries were tortured. The panel said the government failed in its obligation to oversee the nun-run laundries "where it is alleged that physical, emotional abuses and other ill-treatment were committed. " It has asked for compensation for the victims. Human rights groups say young women were abused after being sent to the so-called Magdalene Laundries, a network of 10 workhouses that operated in Ireland from the 1920s to the mid-1990s.
NEWS
December 11, 2008 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An ex-butler for former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo testified yesterday that he thought the nonprofit formed to help revitalize South Philadelphia was actually Fumo's company. "He seemed in charge of it," said Matthew Fonseca, who served as Fumo's butler from February 2004 to February 2005 and is now a professional polo player. "He seemed to be the boss. " Fonseca said that he saw workers from Citizens' Alliance for Better Neighborhoods arrive at Fumo's Spring Garden mansion and haul away trash, shovel snow, power-wash a patio, and even put up Christmas lights.
SPORTS
May 13, 2008 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saving a stadium Just last year, Tiger Stadium seemed as doomed as Jim Leyland's lungs. Detroit had awarded a demolition contract for the old ballpark and auctioneers had sold off everything, including a dugout urinal. (Why anyone would want a dugout urinal is a subject for another day. "Wanna come down the basement and see my urinal collection?") Now a Detroit group, the Old Tiger Stadium Conservancy, is attempting to save it - the ballpark, not the urinal. The group, which includes Sen. Carl Levin (D., Mich.
NEWS
March 21, 2008
WHEN THE CRACK in a supporting column forced the closure of I-95 earlier this week, we cringed. Talk about hanging your dirty laundry, or rather, broken roads, out for the nation to see - and to swear over, as 180,000 cars a day would be forced to exit off the interstate and get diverted through Port Richmond. And with the increased traffic from a looming holiday weekend, our status as Coolville quickly could have changed to @#^& !-Town, as drivers cursed our slow-to-move bureaucracy and chaotic approach to traffic management.
NEWS
October 24, 2007
IS IT TIME for Eagles coach Andy Reid to step down? Normally that question would be grist for debates in sports bars, on sports-talk radio or among die-hard Eagles fans. But these aren't normal times for Andy Reid. The public airing of his family's dirty laundry - his sons Garrett and Britt's drug arrests and subsequent run-ins with the law - have even made people unfamiliar with pro football ponder Reid's fate. It's too easy to draw a straight line from Reid's off-field issues to his team's on-field struggles.
NEWS
October 16, 2007 | By Michael Smerconish
There was a time I could walk into most of the bars in picturesque Lambertville, just over the bridge from New Hope, and greet people in the way immortalized on Cheers. I knew their faces and their names. After all, we were also together in homeroom, gym class, and geometry. They were my high school classmates, and we were able to avoid Pennsylvania's minimum drinking age (21) by driving just 10 miles to New Jersey, where the minimum was 18 - and even that sometimes seemed negotiable.
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