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Dirty War

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NEWS
August 14, 2002
REMEMBER Jose Padilla? He's the American Attorney General John Ashcroft branded a major terrorist who planned to detonate a radioactive "dirty" bomb. Well, you can forget all that. An FBI investigation has found no evidence that Padilla was planning an attack, or even has any connection to al Qaeda, law-enforcement sources are now saying. Still, despite growing doubts that Padilla is a serious terrorism threat, the U.S. government is insisting on holding him without charges being filed and without a trial.
NEWS
January 3, 1992
It was the dirtiest, most resilient of wars - conserving its energy, allocating its horrors, outlasting Nicaragua's revolution and the Cold War's end. El Salvador's conflict had deep indigenous roots, but would come to rely for sustenance on annual infusions of U.S. aid as reliable as those for Vietnam once were. The country would come to have, too, a war economy, a war mentality. There was little incentive to quit. El Salvador never quite gripped the American consciousness as Nicaragua did. And its 12-year war never climbed high enough on the agenda to demand fixing, defusing, ending.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | By Martin Walker
When the CIA's Harold J. Nicholson was arrested on a charge of espionage at Dulles airport earlier this month, he was carrying a copy of The Washington Post, with its long obituary of a rather more significant figure in the annals of espionage. The death of Alger Hiss and the arrest of Nicholson took place within 24 hours of each other, and they constitute a sad epilogue to an era when the profession of the spy had combined a deep if misplaced conviction with a dash of warped honor.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Miguel Nazar Haro, 87, who led Mexico's domestic spy agency and was accused of being behind the disappearances of alleged leftist guerrillas in the 1970s, died Thursday. Mr. Nazar Haro headed Mexico's now-dissolved Federal Security Directorate from 1978 to 1982 at the height of the government's "dirty war" against leftist insurgents. He was arrested in 2004 and put under house arrest on charges stemming from the disappearances of six farmers who were alleged members of a group called the Brigada Campesina de los Lacandones, an armed group that the government linked to at least one kidnapping.
NEWS
April 21, 1987
It was indeed a happy Easter moment for Argentina, where for once Latin American history did not play true to form: This time the democrats got to win. Argentina's fledgling civilian government had faced perhaps its severest test over the weekend when first one band of war-painted soldiers and then, quickly, another challenged the young democracy's authority to hold the military accountable for the "dirty war" it waged from 1976 to 1983. When it was over, President Raul Alfonsin was able to tell the cheering tens of thousands in Buenos Aires, "The mutinous men have backed down," and the newspapers, once silenced, could crow: "Democracy Triumphs!"
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | Daily News wire services
Republicans break ranks, delay vote on U.N. nominee John Bolton's nomination as U.N. ambassador suffered an unexpected setback yesterday when the Republican-controlled Senate Foreign Relations Committee scrapped plans for a vote in favor of a fresh look at allegations of unbecoming conduct. A delay of at least two weeks seems likely while the committee looks into fresh allegations, including those of a Dallas businesswoman who says Bolton berated her at an international conference a decade ago. The delay came after Ohio Republican George Voinovich said he had "heard enough today that I don't feel comfortable about voting for Mr. Bolton.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | Daily News wire services
ZAGREB, CROATIA SERBS STRIKE BACK, HITTING CAPITAL SITES Serb missiles spread terror through the heart of this elegant capital yesterday, smashing into a children's hospital, a theater and other sites. One policeman was killed and 64 people were injured, including children and foreign ballet dancers. Twenty-one dancers from the Vienna-based Danube Ballet Company, who were wounded during a rehearsal at the Academy of Dramatic Arts, were rushed to the Hospital of the Sisters of Mercy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The revolutionary power of motherhood is the life-affirming theme of Las Madres de Plaza de Mayo. This riveting documentary chronicles the brave women who, during Argentina's "dirty war" of the 1970s, under threat of death protested the military government's kidnapping of their children. As dramatized in the film The Official Story, the junta declared that the desaparecidos (literally, the disappeared ones) were left-wing subversives. Not so, insist many mothers of the estimated 30,000 desaparecidos kidnapped, brutally tortured and murdered by the military regime of Gen. Jorge Videla.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Most likely because 17th-century colonials wiped out the indigenous Indian population, Argentina is the most European of South American countries. Ditto its film exports, which until recently did not reveal a national character in the way that, say, Brazilian cinema so colorfully asserts. Made in Argentina, an urgent film about political exiles who return to their homeland after the junta gave way to the Alfonsin democracy in 1983, is one recent movie that tries to define the contemporary Argentine spirit.
NEWS
October 20, 2003 | By Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Dozens of skeletons are strewn helter-skelter. Skulls are cracked where bullets passed through. Jaws remain open as if still screaming. A glance at the photos makes it easy to understand why, nearly three decades later, Argentina's "dirty war" still inflames passions. More than 120 skeletons were found in the mass grave in the San Vicente cemetery near the industrial town of Cordoba. The site is said to be the largest such grave uncovered to date in Argentina, where military rulers are thought to have killed 10,000 to 30,000 leftists, real or perceived, from 1976 to 1983 in a "dirty war" against what they said were communist sympathizers trying to take over the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does the Bill of Rights apply to all Americans, or only those the government deems worthy? Should American citizens be assassinated for committing crimes - however heinous - without being charged, tried, or convicted? These are some of the exigent questions asked by Jeremy Scahill in his new film, Dirty Wars , a shocking piece of investigative journalism about the covert campaigns waged by U.S. Special Forces since the Sept. 11 attacks. (It's a companion piece to Scahill's book, Dirty Wars: The World Is a Battlefield .)
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
MOVIES LIKE "Act of Valor" and "Zero Dark Thirty" give us the clean-kill version of special ops and the war on terror - the documentary "Dirty Wars" offers another view. In it, Afghani cellphone-camera footage shows U.S. special forces cleaning up after a botched raid - bad intelligence sends them to attack a wedding instead of a terror cell, and women and pro-U.S. police are killed. There's a botched cover-up, but there's too much eyewitness video, so eventually there's an admission of guilt and an apology - a high ranking U.S. official shows up and sacrifices a goat (more eyewitness video)
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AS A PEOPLE, we generally believe that our national elected representatives are a bunch of doofuses. Last week, approval ratings for Congress hit a record low of 10 percent, which is pretty much zero, factoring out the doofuses themselves. The same pollsters, meanwhile, find that on policies such as drone strikes and secret surveillance, we're roughly two-thirds supportive. Thus arises a problem - we citizens are not permitted to know the extent of the drone and surveillance programs.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Geir Moulson, Associated Press
BERLIN - A Jesuit priest who was kidnapped by the Argentine military junta in the 1970s said Wednesday that he and a fellow cleric weren't denounced by the future Pope Francis, then leader of Argentina's Jesuits. The Rev. Francisco Jalics, a Hungarian native who now lives in a German monastery, said in a statement that he was following up on comments about the case last week because he had received a lot of questions and "some commentaries imply the opposite of what I meant. " He did not elaborate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgardo David Holzman's debut novel, Malena (Nortia Press), opens in a smoky Buenos Aires cafe. A dashing army captain named Diego and his lover Inés are dancing to their favorite tango, "Malena. " Malena sings the tango like no one else and into each verse she pours her heart. Her voice is perfumed with the weeds of the slum. Malena feels the pain of the bandoneón. It's an intensely romantic scene - but it's also a scene filled with mortal dread.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Miguel Nazar Haro, 87, who led Mexico's domestic spy agency and was accused of being behind the disappearances of alleged leftist guerrillas in the 1970s, died Thursday. Mr. Nazar Haro headed Mexico's now-dissolved Federal Security Directorate from 1978 to 1982 at the height of the government's "dirty war" against leftist insurgents. He was arrested in 2004 and put under house arrest on charges stemming from the disappearances of six farmers who were alleged members of a group called the Brigada Campesina de los Lacandones, an armed group that the government linked to at least one kidnapping.
NEWS
May 3, 2007 | Reviewed by Sarah Weinman, For The Inquirer
The Ministry of Special Cases By Nathan Englander Knopf. 339 pp. $25 Nathan Englander debuted auspiciously with For the Relief of Unbearable Urges, a 1999 short story collection that drew comparisons to Philip Roth's Goodbye, Columbus for its searing, often satirical portraits of Jews in various stages of religious observance. Had Englander been born just a year earlier, it's highly likely he would have been included on Granta's list that year of "Best of Young American Novelists" age 35 and younger.
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | Daily News wire services
Republicans break ranks, delay vote on U.N. nominee John Bolton's nomination as U.N. ambassador suffered an unexpected setback yesterday when the Republican-controlled Senate Foreign Relations Committee scrapped plans for a vote in favor of a fresh look at allegations of unbecoming conduct. A delay of at least two weeks seems likely while the committee looks into fresh allegations, including those of a Dallas businesswoman who says Bolton berated her at an international conference a decade ago. The delay came after Ohio Republican George Voinovich said he had "heard enough today that I don't feel comfortable about voting for Mr. Bolton.
NEWS
March 15, 2005 | CAROL TOWARNICKY
"Somebody tell me frankly, what times are these, what kind of world, what country?" THESE words come from a poem about torture that Chilean writer Ariel Dorfman composed during the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. But they resonate through the seemingly daily revelations from government and military reports of the abuse of prisoners by Americans in Guantanamo, Afghanistan and Iraq. They fit all too well the testimony of those whom the CIA allegedly delivered to countries where they were tortured.
NEWS
September 2, 2004 | By Susana Hayward INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
President Vicente Fox defended his government's democratic gains yesterday in his fourth state of the union address, but thousands of protesters staged a one-day strike and nearly paralyzed this metropolis, symptomatic of public anger over rising crime, corruption and poverty. "When I became president of Mexico, I included society's democratic aspirations in my government's projects," Fox said. "The mandate citizens gave me was clear: to advance building a government guided by the independence of government branches and the strengthening of the legal order.
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