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Dirty Water

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NEWS
February 16, 1989 | By Donald Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The Horsham Township Council this week listened to testimony about what everybody in neighboring Hatboro is talking about these days - slimy, dirty water infiltrating pipes, pools and plumbing fixtures. Rosalie Hoffman, a resident of Horsham's 45-home Squires Estate complex, told the council during its meeting Tuesday evening that several complex residents have reported the presence of brown, sooty water. The complex, which features four-bedroom homes, is between Cedar Hill and Lower State Roads, Hoffman said.
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Beam, Jose Cuervo, and Johnny Walker are in the pokey. State investigators confiscated 1,000 open bottles from 29 bars and restaurants across the state to see whether the contents were premium brands or substituted cheap booze - or worse - and being sold as the good stuff. On Thursday, state officials released new details of a yearlong investigation, "Operation Swill," that found rubbing alcohol, dirty water, and food coloring in a few cocktails sold as premium drinks. "This alleged scheme is a dishonest ruse to increase profits, and it is a slap in the face to the consumer," state Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said during a news conference in Trenton.
NEWS
August 21, 1999
Use (and reuse) paper plates and cups so you don't have to use the dishwasher. And keep a dishpan in the sink in which you can wash fruits, vegetables and your hands. Then use the dirty water for your plants. Elizabeth Hart Westtown Have a suggestion on how to save water? Call 215-854-5060 and we'll print the best ones.
NEWS
December 15, 1992 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If this was a typical holiday season, the staff at the Quarry Valley Farm in Lahaska, Bucks County, would be in high gear - stringing lights and setting up a live Nativity scene for the scores of visitors expected in the next few weeks. But this is not a typical season for the 48-acre farm. Last week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture closed Quarry Valley for operating an unlicensed petting zoo, citing several violations of the Animal Welfare Act, such as inadequate shelter for some animals.
NEWS
December 4, 2002 | By William DiMascio
In explaining the way criminal justice policies are made, a prisoner sentenced to life once said: "If you offer a thirsty man a glass filled with clean water or a glass filed with dirty water, there is no question which one he will drink. But if you offer a glass of dirty water or an empty glass, he'll be forced to drink the dirty water. It's the second set of choices that usually applies in prison. " Indeed, the fact that we too often make bad choices from limited and imperfect options is one of the reasons the United States is so out of step with criminal justice systems in other parts of the world.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | By Michael E. Ruane and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writers
A historic brownstone mansion, decorated with Tiffany stained-glass windows and pillared entrances, was heavily damaged in a two-alarm fire yesterday in Philadelphia's Spring Garden section. The Bergdoll Mansion, a chocolate-colored building in the Beaux Arts style on the northwest corner of 22d and Green Streets, was hit by the blaze about 11 a.m., fire officials said. The fire was declared under control at 11:53 a.m. There was one serious injury. A firefighter, Dennis McCabe, was admitted to Hahnemann University Hospital suffering from chest pains and smoke inhalation.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
More than 50,000 Camden residents, as well as such commercial customers as restaurants, were warned last night to boil their water for the next 48 hours after a 30-inch sewage pipe was crushed. Because of the water emergency, all of Camden's public schools will be closed today, Board of Education President Philip E. Freeman Sr. said late last night. They will remain closed, Freeman said, "until we know the water is safe. " The problem occurred about 10 a.m. yesterday while workers for a private contractor overhauling the city's water infrastructure were changing a main valve near East State Street and River Road in Cramer Hill.
NEWS
August 4, 1989 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cape May County health officials reopened six beaches in Wildwood and Wildwood Crest yesterday, less than 24 hours after they had been closed because of elevated bacteria counts. Local officials, meanwhile, complained that the shore's latest pollution scare was being exaggerated by county health officials and the news media. "This is very aggravating, very frustrating," said Joyce Gould, mayor of Wildwood Crest, where two beaches were closed for what she called "alleged problems.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On the edge of the suburban frontier in Upper Bucks County, lawmen in Richland Township are wrangling with a new kind of outlaw: landscapers, contractors and others who ride up in tanker trucks in the dead of night, tap into fire hydrants on neighborhood streets, and make off with thousands of gallons of public water. Richland police officers, who in the past several weeks have been staking out remote hydrants and other public connection points vulnerable to such plundering, say they caught their first culprit last week.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
MAYOR Nutter wants me to pay to have my trash picked up? News-flash: I already do, it's called taxes. I waited two weeks for my trash to be picked up, and when it was, they left half of it in the street. And let's not forget about the snow that never saw a plow and the dirty streets where the snow is melting, leaving dirty water you have to step in to get a bus. These dumb kids in the mobs who go through the city and destroy it more, let them clean these streets as punishment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Beam, Jose Cuervo, and Johnny Walker are in the pokey. State investigators confiscated 1,000 open bottles from 29 bars and restaurants across the state to see whether the contents were premium brands or substituted cheap booze - or worse - and being sold as the good stuff. On Thursday, state officials released new details of a yearlong investigation, "Operation Swill," that found rubbing alcohol, dirty water, and food coloring in a few cocktails sold as premium drinks. "This alleged scheme is a dishonest ruse to increase profits, and it is a slap in the face to the consumer," state Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa said during a news conference in Trenton.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
For three days, Joe Mannini's kitchen was a chaotic scene of boiling pots of water and questions from worried customers about his pizza dough's tap water content. "There weren't a whole lot of customers," the Winslow Township pizzeria owner said Monday afternoon. "In reality, the oven is 500 degrees. That will kill any bacteria, and if it doesn't, it probably deserves to live. " Mannini and the other 35,000 people in the eastern Camden County township could breathe a collective sigh of relief Monday afternoon after the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection approved the lifting of a drinking water ban that followed the discovery of E. coli in the town's public water system last week.
NEWS
May 17, 2010
Horticulturists at Pennsylvania State University have come up with a low-cost, green method for recycling so-called "gray" water - the stuff from sinks, showers and washing machines that would otherwise go down the drain. They filter the water through some plant roots and layers of crushed stone, peat moss and waste materials - making it clean enough to reuse for growing vegetables or flushing toilets - but not for drinking. Using gray water is generally not allowed in the United States, but some states have explored the idea.
NEWS
March 10, 2010
MAYOR Nutter wants me to pay to have my trash picked up? News-flash: I already do, it's called taxes. I waited two weeks for my trash to be picked up, and when it was, they left half of it in the street. And let's not forget about the snow that never saw a plow and the dirty streets where the snow is melting, leaving dirty water you have to step in to get a bus. These dumb kids in the mobs who go through the city and destroy it more, let them clean these streets as punishment.
NEWS
April 5, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
More than 50,000 Camden residents, as well as such commercial customers as restaurants, were warned last night to boil their water for the next 48 hours after a 30-inch sewage pipe was crushed. Because of the water emergency, all of Camden's public schools will be closed today, Board of Education President Philip E. Freeman Sr. said late last night. They will remain closed, Freeman said, "until we know the water is safe. " The problem occurred about 10 a.m. yesterday while workers for a private contractor overhauling the city's water infrastructure were changing a main valve near East State Street and River Road in Cramer Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A shag-carpet ride through a screwball community of shaggers and prudes, John Waters' raunchily entertaining farce A Dirty Shame divides the population of Baltimore into sexaholics and neuters. As the two camps suit up for battle over the heart and nether regions of Charm City, Sylvia Stickles (Tracey Ullman) doesn't know which side she's on. Before breakfast she's a frowzy matron who shudders at the idea of conjugal relations with her husband, Vaughn (Chris Isaak). But by lunchtime a concussion has transformed the stick-in-the-mud into a superfreak.
NEWS
December 4, 2002 | By William DiMascio
In explaining the way criminal justice policies are made, a prisoner sentenced to life once said: "If you offer a thirsty man a glass filled with clean water or a glass filed with dirty water, there is no question which one he will drink. But if you offer a glass of dirty water or an empty glass, he'll be forced to drink the dirty water. It's the second set of choices that usually applies in prison. " Indeed, the fact that we too often make bad choices from limited and imperfect options is one of the reasons the United States is so out of step with criminal justice systems in other parts of the world.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | By Angela Valdez INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Kara and Donald Butler fell asleep that night, as on most nights, in the living room of their small bungalow in the Browns Mills section of Pemberton Township. He lay down on the floor with a pillow; she curled up on the couch. Trinity, their 18-month-old daughter, was put in her crib, although she usually slept in her mother's arms. The Butlers awoke to the sound of the front door crashing in and slamming against the wall. Two men in black masks stepped into the room, bats held over their heads.
NEWS
August 21, 1999
Use (and reuse) paper plates and cups so you don't have to use the dishwasher. And keep a dishpan in the sink in which you can wash fruits, vegetables and your hands. Then use the dirty water for your plants. Elizabeth Hart Westtown Have a suggestion on how to save water? Call 215-854-5060 and we'll print the best ones.
NEWS
July 20, 1999 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
On the edge of the suburban frontier in Upper Bucks County, lawmen in Richland Township are wrangling with a new kind of outlaw: landscapers, contractors and others who ride up in tanker trucks in the dead of night, tap into fire hydrants on neighborhood streets, and make off with thousands of gallons of public water. Richland police officers, who in the past several weeks have been staking out remote hydrants and other public connection points vulnerable to such plundering, say they caught their first culprit last week.
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