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Dirty Water

NEWS
April 20, 1996
The nation's 26th Earth Day, Monday, finds environmentalists energized and perhaps surprised at their own power. To some, the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 meant a mandate to dismantle two decades of environmental protections, under the guise of reducing regulations and getting government off Americans' backs. The campaign went in all directions - from plans to sell off federal lands for development to undermining the Endangered Species Act to gutting the Environmental Protection Agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2001 | By Ed Condran FOR THE INQUIRER
On its own, the Copa Lounge is an unremarkable room. The Atlantic City nightspot has the requisite bar, tables, and television sets tuned to ESPN. A certain personality, however, can add a great deal to the club on the second floor of the Sands Hotel & Casino. In 1981, after performing in A.C., Frank Sinatra would relax at the Copa with pals Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. and Jerry Blavat. The Chairman of the Board is gone, but he can still be heard there on occasion on Thursday nights between 5 and 7. That's when Blavat, the Geator with the Heater, the Boss with the Hot Sauce, holds court.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
No evidence of foul play has been found in the death of a King of Prussia man whose skeletal remains were found in gravel pit in Rhode Island on Saturday, almost two years after he had been reported missing. "It may have been a natural death. We don't have enough information," Marilyn London, a Rhode Island pathologist who examined the body, said yesterday. Six Brown University students and an instructor found Erwin M. Wehner's skeleton Saturday while on a field trip in West Greenwich, R.I., searching for meteorites in a gravel pit. Wehner, 33, was last seen in the late afternoon of July 9, 1990, jogging in West Greenwich, where he was staying to supervise a three-week clearance sale at a Foot Locker shoe store in Lincoln, R.I., 25 miles away.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1998 | By Jonathan Valania, FOR THE INQUIRER
In an age in which alienation is an aesthetic and irony is a medium, the show-biz motto might as well be: One More Time Please, With Less Feeling. Depeche Mode obliged that request to play it again bland at the First Union Spectrum on Sunday night as it flogged its dead-horse collection of hits, Singles 86> 98 (Reprise). In the '80s, Depeche Mode's doomy synth pablum served as comfort food for depressed teenagers. In the '90s, the British band provided the sound track for black-clad dance-club dwellers who performed their orchestral maneuvers in the dark, staving off the horrible truth that the '80s had, in fact, ended some time ago. Really, the best thing you can say about Depeche Mode's music is that the videos are great.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
The grim search for victims in the debris-clogged waters of the Mississippi River in Minneapolis could have been worse, but for the heroics of other motorists and first responders also caught up in the Interstate 35W bridge collapse. When as many as 50 vehicles plunged into the water Wednesday, survivors became others' saviors - helping them to the river banks. Emergency crews' rapid work no doubt spared other lives. For those who perished and for the families of motorists whose fates remain unknown, our prayers and condolences are offered.
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
It had been billed as the best thing to happen to clean water. It sailed through the Senate. Environmentalists pushed it through one Assembly committee and dodged attempts they said would weaken it in another. Then yesterday, the proposal to give New Jersey one of the toughest clean- water laws in the nation was killed when the Assembly voted to amend the bill in a way that environmentalists said weakened it so much as to leave it useless. The vote was among the most dramatic of a jam-packed day in the legislature that also saw an Assembly committee act on a bill to strengthen the state's "right-to-die" laws while the full Assembly passed a measure to protect patients from impaired or incompetent physicians.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
On one side of Courtroom 306 sat the son of mobster Salvatore "Chuckie" Merlino. "My father shouldn't be on trial," insisted reputed mob underboss Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino. On the other side of the Criminal Justice Center courtroom sat the son of the man who was murdered, Frank "Frankie Flowers" D'Alfonso. "They were convicted once. I don't see why they shouldn't be convicted again," said Frank D'Alfonso Jr. of the six men on trial. Opposite sides, opposite views.
NEWS
May 17, 1995
WELL-MANAGED COMPANIES DON'T NEED TO DOWNSIZE In his Commentary Page piece May 13, Dan Rottenberg defends downsizing as a necessary, albeit unpleasant, business strategy. He takes a popular position: To be competitive, companies have to fire lots of employees. This idea that a company cannot be competitive without downsizing is simply wrong. There are two ways to be profitable: Downsizing is the easy, shortsighted way, requiring no management skill. The alternative is competent management, as conceived by the late management expert, W. Edwards Deming.
NEWS
December 10, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The state Department of Environmental Protection proposed sweeping new storm-water management regulations yesterday that would require builders to re-channel storm runoff back into the ground. The changes to the Stormwater Management Rules, which have not been updated since their adoption in 1983, would help maintain water quality, reduce flooding and replenish the state's drought-stricken aquifers, Commissioner Bradley Campbell said. If 15 inches of rain had fallen on a strip of farmland before it became a housing development, and eight inches had seeped in to recharge the groundwater, a developer would be required to make sure that at least eight inches reached the aquifer after houses were built.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | By Leila Fadel INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Saddam Hussein's high-backed black chair was empty in the dock where his codefendants sat yesterday for the third day of testimony in their trial. Two witnesses testified, telling more stories of torture but producing no evidence directly linking Hussein and his seven codefendants to the massacre of nearly 150 people in the city of Dujail in 1982. The court adjourned until Dec. 21 to clear the calendar for a national election next Thursday. Hussein was excused from the roughly three-hour session, said Raed Juhi, the investigative judge who prepared the case against the deposed dictator and his codefendants.
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