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Dirty Water

NEWS
February 10, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Schoolchildren in Camden and Audubon have no doubt that humans will be traveling to Mars and maybe even living there within their lifetimes. The planet closest to Earth, which for previous generations was the stuff of science-fiction novels, comic books and B movies, has been demystified for a small group of fifth and sixth graders participating in a NASA-sponsored science program. "This could save us one day," said 11-year-old Sam Bednarchik, a sixth grader at Haviland Avenue School in Audubon.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The whoosh of artillery scared blackbirds from the pear trees, and Stofi Kryeziu worried that her six children faced another cold dusk listening to gunfire in a hut made of branches, plastic and withered cornstalks. The tentative agreement that averted NATO air strikes against Yugoslav bases in Kosovo was bad news to the Kryeziu family of 25 refugees, living in three huts on this muddy hilltop. Without a NATO attack, Kryeziu said, they - like many of the nearly 300,000 ethnic Albanian refugees scattered across this pocked and blackened landscape - will be too frightened to return to their homes.
NEWS
August 21, 1998 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Home for Xu Xiaozhen and her family is a makeshift tent of bamboo and plastic burlap, perched on a 10-foot-wide dike with water lapping at both sides. Her real house - 10 years old, two stories with a mosaic tile exterior - is about 200 yards away, nearly submerged. Every day, Xu and her husband paddle out in a skiff to inspect it. By now, three weeks after they moved to higher ground, she can joke about it. "We'll just add another floor to our house," the 39-year-old farmer said with a laugh, as she drifted past her house on a recent inspection.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | By Erin Mooney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although 10 families still complain of contaminated drinking water, the state Department of Environmental Protection might soon close its investigation, absolving a local developer. The DEP, the Bucks County Department of Health, and two private consultants have all conducted numerous tests on the well water of 10 families who say their water has become contaminated from construction of a nearby development. DEP officials say the area is free of contamination. Residents say contamination still exists.
NEWS
October 6, 1995
DAILY NEWS OVERDOING RACIAL ANGLE When will the Daily News get tired of playing the race card? A reader can pick up the paper on any day and bet the house that somewhere - doesn't matter if it's a story, editorial, guest opinion, letter, syndicated column or a Daily News staff columnist - there will always be racial overtones to whatever is printed. Change the paper's name to the Philadelphia Racial News, or better yet, the Mumia Abu-Jamal Daily News. That's all you folks care about.
NEWS
July 17, 1995
America has attacked water pollution forcefully since the early 1970s, but there's still much to be done. No longer do hundreds of millions of tons of raw sewage run into U.S. waters every year. Still, pollution caused more than 10,000 beach closings in the last five years. Unfortunately, the House in May voted to weaken the engine of progress against water pollution: the Clean Water Act of 1972. And last week, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut the budget of the act's enforcer, the Environmental Protection Agency, by one-third.
NEWS
February 12, 1995 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Spring and summer rainstorms may be months away, but plans designed to ease the township's long struggle with flooding problems are in the works. A $7 million state Department of Transportation project slated to begin next month as part of the Airport Circle redesign could prevent the floods that have for years plagued the area near the Chandler's Run creek. In recent years, residents there have seen their houses and cars swamped when the creek overflows, and they have begged the township to do something.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | By Sid Holmes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The water war between Phoenixville and Schuylkill Township has been settled with the adoption of a compromise negotiated by the state Public Utility Commission. At least for the moment. Under terms of the settlement, the borough's request for a 28.3 percent water rate increase has been whittled down to 10 percent. That reduces the increase from $183,756 to $64,500. The agreement formally resolves a complaint Schuylkill filed with the PUC in September asking the commission to require that Philadelphia Suburban Water Co. take over the water service for the 575 township customers served by Phoenixville.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Barbara J. Turner burns with almost palpable energy as she goes about her daily rounds as manager of the sprawling Harrison Plaza public housing development. That energy has propelled her through two decades at the Philadelphia Housing Authority - through various clerical posts, title shifts and policy changes - but she has never needed it more than now. With a new world being born at PHA, thanks to a federally inspired partnership, she and the 41 other site managers are helping reorganize the troubled authority at the same time they run their buildings and cope with residents.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Construction of a $1.2 million water tower off Memorial Avenue is expected to help rid the township of "dirty water" complaints from residents. The tower, near the center of town, should be sending water into mains by Memorial Day, Councilman Anthony Battaglia said. When completed, the tower will be filled with water from the wells near Memorial Avenue and Harmony Road. "We'll be able to use that water during the day for the residents, and fill it up at night during low peak," Battaglia said.
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