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Disaster

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NEWS
March 24, 1986
After reading your excellent, thought-provoking March 9 editorial "Warning bells ring out about danger in the skies," I heard Federal Aviation Administrator Donald Engen on television disagree with the General Accouting Office study that air travel isn't as safe as it should be. His contention was based on a decrease in accidents according to recent statistics, despite the pressure on a declining overworked staff of air traffic controllers and...
NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have tsunamis or earthquakes been in your dreams? You're not alone. Such images arise in dreams all the time. But since the catastrophes afflicting Japan after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, they take on new meaning. What, if anything, do such dreams tell us? They're a response to human suffering - and a portal to the stress in our personal lives. They're a survival strategy as old as evolution. And - at the outer limits of dream theory - there's the possibility that dreams may be a kind of transspecies early-warning system.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
Many companies just can't operate if they can't use their computers. And in the San Francisco area this week, many companies confronted exactly that problem. But the lucky ones already had foreseen such a threat. Long before the catastrophic earthquake twisted through San Francisco on Tuesday, they had hired outfits like SunGard Data Systems Inc., of Wayne. SunGard is part of a tiny but increasingly important industry that specializes in providing emergency computer backup for companies in the event of a disaster.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
TO PHILADELPHIA Democrats from a two-time Bush voter and fellow Philadelphian: The majority of Americans do not think like you. WE, on the other hand, loathe the Hollywood and cultural radicalism that gets forced on us by the media on a daily basis. WE believe that the producers, the well-educated and the ambitious among us deserve to be haves and the antithesis deserve to be have-nots. WE understand that big business is the catalyst for capitalism, and that the economic boom of the '90s was due to more than a decade of Reaganomics (NOT Bill Clinton)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For some bands, the departure of a lead singer and principal songwriter spells certain disaster. For the Pogues, whose notoriously alcoholic front man Shane MacGowan was replaced last year, it appears to be just a temporary setback. As if to prove it remains one of the world's greatest anarchistic dance bands, the MacGowan-less group did everything it used to do Saturday at the near-capacity Trocadero. There were reels and jigs and country weepers and Irish ballads. More than once, the carefully appointed mandolin/violin underpinning erupted into blitzkrieging rants served with punkish glee and an Irishman's grin.
NEWS
February 4, 2003 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now come the psychologists, now come the priests. Here are the unbidden journalists, the amateur videographers, the numb families, the stunned public. We assemble again for the American tragedy. By now we know our parts, taught by bitter precedent what to expect and how it all feels. When the space shuttle Columbia fell 40 miles onto Texas and Louisiana on Saturday like a streaking, spent star, the echoes of Sept. 11, 2001, were evident: Disaster played out against a sharp blue sky around 9 a.m., and we got to watch it unfold, in real time, on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Darkness and disaster loom large in this year's selection of five Academy Award-nominated live-action shorts. Maybe it's the glum mood across the land, and around the world, or just a reflection of the prevailing temperament in the Academy committee's screening room, but try this on for size: child slavery in India ("Kavi"), nuclear contamination in Russia ("The Door"), surreal desolation Down Under ("Miracle Fish"), dead bodies in a New York apartment ("The New Tenants"), and a bumbling magician sticking swords through his volunteers ("Instead of Abracadabra")
SPORTS
May 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Los Angles Lakers took advantage of a deep hole dug by the San Antonio Spurs to avoid getting in one themselves. Nick Van Exel scored 25 points as the Lakers took a 92-85 victory last night to cut the visiting Spurs' playoff lead to 2-1. Game 4 of the best-of-seven Western Conference semifinals is tomorrow at the Forum. The Spurs dug themselves a deep hole in the opening quarter with poor shooting - 5-for-20 - and even poorer rebounding. The Lakers, who shot 48 percent from the field in the period, outrebounded the Spurs, 18-8, and led, 28-11.
NEWS
June 8, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The BP oil spill is two media events: one environmental and one political. The ecological and economic disaster - oily pelicans, tar balls, empty restaurants, grounded fishing fleets - has prompted monumental media coverage charged with outrage and frustration. Add politics, and this combustible mixture has flared into a second story as white-hot as the first. Ever since the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, which killed 11 people, today's fractionated, diverse media world - cable TV, public radio, Internet - has shown that it can cover multiple angles of a complex story.
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NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As he runs for president, Gov. Christie is trumpeting rehabilitation for addicts and condemning the war on drugs as a "decades-long disaster. " It's not an approach typically associated with the Republican Party, but Christie balances it by maintaining that dangerous offenders must be locked up. His call last week to replicate New Jersey policy nationally and make treatment programs mandatory for drug-addicted, nonviolent offenders offered voters...
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a violent earthquake and tsunami struck Japan in March 2011, emergency responders needed to vent hydrogen gas from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant before it reached dangerous levels. But radiation exposure kept workers from finishing the job, and the gas fueled explosions in two reactor buildings. Could a robot have done a better job? That question is a primary driver of a two-day competition sponsored next month by the research arm of the Pentagon. Twenty-five teams from around the world have programmed robots to tackle eight tasks of the sort that one might encounter in disaster response.
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
After a major accident or disaster, rescue operations have always focused on the nuts and bolts - saving the survivors, searching for those who didn't make it, securing the evidence. Now an added dimension - call it the consumer perspective - has expanded how disaster planners think. Philadelphia emergency management officials say it guided their response to the Amtrak derailment that killed eight and injured more than 200 a dozen days ago. Passengers are going through "the most traumatic time of their lives," said Everett A. Gillison, Mayor Nutter's chief of staff and deputy mayor for public safety.
NEWS
May 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IT'S EARLY Monday morning, and I'm at 30th Street Station. It has been six days since the deadly crash of Amtrak's Train 188 in Frankford shut down rail service between Philly and New York. Northbound Amtrak service resumes at 5:53 a.m., and city officials, railroad administrators and reporters galore are at the station. I'm not really here for the hoopla. I'd planned only to ride the train for a passenger's-eye view of the disaster site. Still, I say hello to the mayor, scribble quotes from Amtrak bigwigs and ask a few commuters how it feels to board the first northbound Amtrak train after the disaster.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | BECKY BATCHA
FOLLOWING A house fire, a hurricane, a catastrophic train wreck, volunteers and staff from the Red Cross materialize - seemingly out of thin air - to help victims back on their feet. "We address all those human needs that restore your dignity to you," says judge Renee Cardwell Hughes, CEO at the American Red Cross of Eastern Pennsylvania. Within hours after Tuesday night's Amtrak derailment, her people had manned two help centers for passengers and their worried families, one at 30th Street Station and another at Webster Elementary on Frankford Avenue.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN & MENSAH DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
TUESDAY NIGHT'S fatal derailment was the worst Philadelphia train disaster in decades. The timing seemed chillingly prophetic: Just one day before the crash, the city's Office of Emergency Management had held a "mass casualty workshop" with police, fire and health personnel. Moments after Train 188 careened off the tracks, emergency calls went out across the city and scores of first responders rushed to the scene to find the mangled bodies of those killed and more than 200 injured and bloodied passengers.
SPORTS
February 13, 2015 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
TODAY AT Citizens Bank Park, 7 weeks and 3 days before the Phillies' season begins at the 12-year-old ballpark, an equipment truck filled with everything from baseballs and batting helmets to bubblegum and sunflower seeds will begin its annual trek south. It will arrive at the Carpenter Complex in Clearwater, Fla., at some point this weekend. The truck will empty and all of the pieces will be properly put into place before pitchers and catchers take part in their first official workout on Thursday.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN AN early-December fire consumed their kitchen and filled their North Philadelphia house with smoke, Sharon McCurdy and her adult son, Wilson Washington, fled onto 27th Street near Somerset. Their beloved gray-and-white cat, Tigger, was missing. Once the fire scene was secure, former firefighter Jennifer Leary and her Red Paw Emergency Relief Team responded to Tigger's absence as intensely as the Red Cross responds to families displaced by disaster. Leary found Tigger at the scene of the fire, boarded him in her house, took him to a veterinarian and placed him in Red Paw's network of temporary foster homes until he could return to his. After staying with relatives, McCurdy and Washington were able to move back home just before Christmas.
NEWS
November 26, 2014
EACH YEAR Pennsylvania hands out $5.5 billion in subsidies for basic education that follows a formula which is outdated and ignores the realities of local school districts. To use just one example: districts that have lost students in recent years get the same amount of state subsidy, even though they are educating fewer children. And don't even talk about making allowances for such factors as poverty. In fact, in 2007, a "costing-out" study commissioned by the legislature concluded that the state's public schools were underfunded by $4.38 billion.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a disaster waiting to happen. At 10 a.m. Saturday - as scheduled - a startling bang and a few puffs of multicolored smoke kicked off a carefully planned emergency-preparedness exercise at Philadelphia International Airport. Strewn across the runway were more than 100 volunteer victims and an American Airlines jet. "I can't feel my leg!" one victim called out. The live drill, required every three years by the Federal Aviation Administration, had begun. As the airport's Engine 78 arrived first on scene, the air-traffic control tower declared a major aircraft incident at the highest level.
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