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Disaster

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NEWS
March 24, 1986
After reading your excellent, thought-provoking March 9 editorial "Warning bells ring out about danger in the skies," I heard Federal Aviation Administrator Donald Engen on television disagree with the General Accouting Office study that air travel isn't as safe as it should be. His contention was based on a decrease in accidents according to recent statistics, despite the pressure on a declining overworked staff of air traffic controllers and...
BUSINESS
October 20, 1989 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
Many companies just can't operate if they can't use their computers. And in the San Francisco area this week, many companies confronted exactly that problem. But the lucky ones already had foreseen such a threat. Long before the catastrophic earthquake twisted through San Francisco on Tuesday, they had hired outfits like SunGard Data Systems Inc., of Wayne. SunGard is part of a tiny but increasingly important industry that specializes in providing emergency computer backup for companies in the event of a disaster.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
TO PHILADELPHIA Democrats from a two-time Bush voter and fellow Philadelphian: The majority of Americans do not think like you. WE, on the other hand, loathe the Hollywood and cultural radicalism that gets forced on us by the media on a daily basis. WE believe that the producers, the well-educated and the ambitious among us deserve to be haves and the antithesis deserve to be have-nots. WE understand that big business is the catalyst for capitalism, and that the economic boom of the '90s was due to more than a decade of Reaganomics (NOT Bill Clinton)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For some bands, the departure of a lead singer and principal songwriter spells certain disaster. For the Pogues, whose notoriously alcoholic front man Shane MacGowan was replaced last year, it appears to be just a temporary setback. As if to prove it remains one of the world's greatest anarchistic dance bands, the MacGowan-less group did everything it used to do Saturday at the near-capacity Trocadero. There were reels and jigs and country weepers and Irish ballads. More than once, the carefully appointed mandolin/violin underpinning erupted into blitzkrieging rants served with punkish glee and an Irishman's grin.
NEWS
February 4, 2003 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now come the psychologists, now come the priests. Here are the unbidden journalists, the amateur videographers, the numb families, the stunned public. We assemble again for the American tragedy. By now we know our parts, taught by bitter precedent what to expect and how it all feels. When the space shuttle Columbia fell 40 miles onto Texas and Louisiana on Saturday like a streaking, spent star, the echoes of Sept. 11, 2001, were evident: Disaster played out against a sharp blue sky around 9 a.m., and we got to watch it unfold, in real time, on television.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2010 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Darkness and disaster loom large in this year's selection of five Academy Award-nominated live-action shorts. Maybe it's the glum mood across the land, and around the world, or just a reflection of the prevailing temperament in the Academy committee's screening room, but try this on for size: child slavery in India ("Kavi"), nuclear contamination in Russia ("The Door"), surreal desolation Down Under ("Miracle Fish"), dead bodies in a New York apartment ("The New Tenants"), and a bumbling magician sticking swords through his volunteers ("Instead of Abracadabra")
SPORTS
May 13, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Los Angles Lakers took advantage of a deep hole dug by the San Antonio Spurs to avoid getting in one themselves. Nick Van Exel scored 25 points as the Lakers took a 92-85 victory last night to cut the visiting Spurs' playoff lead to 2-1. Game 4 of the best-of-seven Western Conference semifinals is tomorrow at the Forum. The Spurs dug themselves a deep hole in the opening quarter with poor shooting - 5-for-20 - and even poorer rebounding. The Lakers, who shot 48 percent from the field in the period, outrebounded the Spurs, 18-8, and led, 28-11.
NEWS
June 8, 2010 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The BP oil spill is two media events: one environmental and one political. The ecological and economic disaster - oily pelicans, tar balls, empty restaurants, grounded fishing fleets - has prompted monumental media coverage charged with outrage and frustration. Add politics, and this combustible mixture has flared into a second story as white-hot as the first. Ever since the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, which killed 11 people, today's fractionated, diverse media world - cable TV, public radio, Internet - has shown that it can cover multiple angles of a complex story.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1986 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a sense, the computer is the heart of a business, the engine whose constant pumping keeps the money rolling in by keeping the bills rolling out. And when the computer equivalent of a heart attack strikes, a company can be severely disabled. A processor of perishable foods, for example, risked having its inventory spoil on the loading dock because computer glitches were delaying the preparation of truck routing orders. At another local company, water was the culprit in a near disaster.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a disaster waiting to happen. At 10 a.m. Saturday - as scheduled - a startling bang and a few puffs of multicolored smoke kicked off a carefully planned emergency-preparedness exercise at Philadelphia International Airport. Strewn across the runway were more than 100 volunteer victims and an American Airlines jet. "I can't feel my leg!" one victim called out. The live drill, required every three years by the Federal Aviation Administration, had begun. As the airport's Engine 78 arrived first on scene, the air-traffic control tower declared a major aircraft incident at the highest level.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The fallout over mass layoffs from three potential casino closings next month could have a severe impact on the Shore economy, as those whose livelihoods depend on a thriving casino industry brace for the worst. Local retailers, restaurants, and other businesses that rely on casino workers are expecting a hit. Experts say the region could also see an exodus of laid-off workers, especially among those who live in Atlantic City, as they seek jobs and futures elsewhere. About 6,500 workers from Showboat, Trump Plaza, and possibly Revel could all lose their jobs from Aug. 31 to Sept.
REAL_ESTATE
June 15, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Randall Bell and I crossed paths about 11 years ago in San Diego, when he was a guest speaker for breakfast at a real estate conference I was attending. If the name - forgive me - doesn't ring a bell, this is the man known as the "Master of Disaster," called in by owners of properties where terrible events have occurred to determine their effects on the properties' value. According to Bell, he has a nuclear pellet in a bookcase at his Laguna Beach, Calif., office that makes his secretary nervous, and a photo of his children flanked by pictures of a pipeline explosion and the Chernobyl disaster.
SPORTS
June 10, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
PINEHURST, N.C. - It will be an exercise in tongue-biting, a lesson in lip-gnawing this week and next. When the men of the PGA descend on the new planet called Pinehurst No. 2, they will find themselves faced with an unfamiliar game for the second consecutive U.S. Open. The women, who play their Open on the same course the next week, might never return to North Carolina. Last year, short little Merion with its tight boundaries and its jungles of rough stressed club selection, commitment to uncomfortable lines and deciphering diabolical greens that most of the men had never seen before.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
WHEN people get old, accidents and ailments become riskier. A cold can turn to pneumonia. A broken hip can lead to an early demise. It's not pretty, but with proper care the indignities of aging don't have to be lethal. When cities get old, the risks and dangers also increase. Aging pipes and gas mains, crumbling buildings and buckled roads can all take their toll on a city's health - and the safety of its citizens. Ours is certainly not the only old city coping with age, but, as the city marks the year anniversary of one building disaster, it's time to assess how prepared we are. The collapse at 22nd and Market streets was clearly not a simple case of an old building collapsing with age, but a bad mix of a derelict property owner, a demolition crew whose questionable work on the site has led to criminal charges including third-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter, and a city that often operates like an antique machine.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* INDEPENDENT LENS: LET THE FIRE BURN. 10 tonight, WHYY12   JASON OSDER was a fifth-grader living just outside Philadelphia on May 13, 1985, the day police firebombed the MOVE house on Osage Avenue in West Philadelphia, igniting a fire in which 11 people, including five children, died, and the surrounding neighborhood was destroyed. He never forgot. Now an assistant professor at George Washington University, Osder's first documentary, "Let the Fire Burn," winner of the best local feature award at last year's Philadelphia Film Festival, makes its TV debut tonight on PBS' "Independent Lens.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Jacqueline Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a move it said would "increase transparency" in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the New Jersey Office of Emergency Management opened a 30-day public comment period on an important hazard mitigation plan - a full week after it had already submitted the plan to the federal government for approval. The state emergency management office - which regulates everything from dispatch of personnel and equipment to mandatory evacuations during a disaster - on March 11 opened a 30-day public comment period, which it heralded as the first time the agency had ever sought input for the plan from "civilians.
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writers
(Updated at 12:00 p.m.) The White House on Thursday made the obvious official: The region's epochal ice storm that darkened entire communities, shut down businesses, and turned schools into emergency shelters was, indeed, a certified disaster. With the presidential declaration, Philadelphia and the four suburban Pennsylvania counties became eligible to apply for Federal Emergency Management Agency aid. York and Lancaster Counties also were included. In all, 715,000 Peco Energy customers lost power as a result of the storm - the second-highest total for any one event, said Peco spokesman Ben Armstrong.
SPORTS
January 22, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - For the last 3 weeks, the Flyers have flirted with fire. For the most part, they have remained unscathed. Yes, the Flyers gained at least one point in each of their last four games. But they are 5-3-2 in 2014, relying more or less on smoke and mirrors - dangerous games on a wire that can't be tightwalked for an entire half-season. The Flyers' crap blizzard that has been brewing for weeks unleashed an ugly fury on Long Island yesterday afternoon - with a track following the team back home.
NEWS
January 6, 2014
Older workers seen more and more frequently working at fast-food restaurants and big-box stores aren't there for the fun of it. They need the paycheck. Consider them symptoms of a retirement crisis in its initial stages. About 75 million baby boomers began turning 65 in 2011, only to learn that many don't have enough income to retire. More are due to learn that painful lesson. Altogether, Americans are $6.8 trillion short of what they need to retire. Imagine the consequences when the 13 percent of the population over 65 now becomes 18 percent by 2030.
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