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NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just hours before a meeting that could determine the fate of a controversial borough well, the state Department of Environmental Protection released a report saying that shutting off the well "is in the public interest. " The well, at Maple Avenue and Cooper Road in adjoining Berlin Township, has caused acrimony almost since it began pumping 45 million gallons a month in 1997 less than a half-mile from protected wetlands and sensitive habitat. State-mandated tests later proved the well was draining water from a stream that once flowed through the yards of Evesham residents.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The campaigns of State Rep. Matthew Wright (R., Bucks) and his Democratic challenger, Karen Selvaggi, have been marked with verbal volleys between the two about mailings, debate schedules and House perks. The race for the 142d District seat, however, took a more serious turn last week when Wright accused Selvaggi of criminal misconduct for failing to include disclaimer notices on some of her campaign literature. Wright said that Selvaggi "is not following the rules" because some of her campaign posters and flyers fail to note who paid for the printing costs.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012
BUZZING hockey cathedrals. Or boring courtrooms. Sticks and sweaters. Or gavels and robes. Stars enforced by knuckles. Or suits protected by security. This week, with litigation in the air, we will have a better idea which way this 93-day NHL lockout is heading. The hope of a shortened season will either rest in the hands of the players or the hands of a federal judge in New York. Beginning on Sunday, every NHL player was given access to a ballot to vote whether to give its executive board the power to file a "disclaimer of interest," which would dissolve their union in order to fight the legality of the lockout in court.
SPORTS
January 6, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an assist from a federal mediator, the NHL and the players' union appear to be inching closer to a settlement that would end their lengthy labor dispute, bring players back from Europe, and start a shortened season in less than two weeks. If an agreement is reached by Friday, a 48-game season would start Jan. 19, with teams likely playing a conference-only schedule. After both sides talked separately Saturday morning with federal mediator Scot Beckenbaugh in New York City, the parties got together near 1 p.m. - the first time they had met in the same room since negotiations broke down early Thursday morning.
NEWS
October 10, 1995 | by Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's a little mystery. Joe Rocks, the Republican candidate for mayor, holds a press conference and says Mayor Rendell used official city stationery to write a purely political letter. Rendell's letter was to Lance Haver, the Consumer Party mayoral candidate, saying he'd like him to participate in several upcoming campaign debates. Mayor Rendell points out that he had a campaign disclosure statement at the bottom of the letter. But the letter that Rocks hands out to reporters and has blown up on a big poster doesn't carry this disclaimer.
NEWS
August 8, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Two electronic message signs by New York artist Jenny Holzer, installed in the Bourse as part of a sculpture exhibition staged in connection with the Constitution's bicentennial, have been temporarily shut down because of the messages they transmit. As a result of a disagreement between the management of the arcade and Collaborations Inc., the organization that arranged the exhibit, the signs were turned off Thursday on the orders of I. Jerome Milgrim, the Bourse's director of operations.
NEWS
August 14, 1987 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Two electronic message signs by artist Jenny Holzer, installed in the Bourse as part of a Constitutional bicentennial sculpture exhibition, were turned back on yesterday after having been off for a week. The signs were ordered turned off Aug. 6 by I. Jerome Milgrim, director of operations at the Bourse, in a disagreement over the size of disclaimer signs that absolved the Bourse of responsibility for the content of Holzer's signs. Larger disclaimer signs were posted yesterday adjacent to the Holzer signs, which hang under the clocks at the third-floor level at each end of the building.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Bob Wegbreit
*Disclaimer: This article is meant to be read as satire. NORTH PHILADELPHIA, Morgan Hall - Temple University announced today that the school would eliminate seven academic majors in a cost-cutting move. The announcement came after the elimination of seven varsity sports. The majors targeted are English, American Studies, Geology, French, Environmental Studies, Social Work, and Political Science. Students and faculty received little notice of the cuts. Students majoring in the disciplines slated for closure will be given the choice of switching majors or transferring at the end of the semester.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The question of allowing prayers at graduation ceremonies is still an issue in the Owen J. Roberts school district. The district's solicitor advised the school board this week that prayers at graduation - even those with specific disclaimers attached - would make the district a target for lawsuits. "Separation of church and state is the law of the land," solicitor Clarence C. Kegel Jr. said, referring to Supreme Court decisions that prayer in schools is unconstitutional. Kegel's report to the board at Monday's school board meeting was in response to board member the Rev. John C. Kolle's request that the district explore prayer at graduation on a voluntary basis.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
HE HAD ME at the dedication. Don Silver, a personal-finance author, has written an e-book to help explain the Affordable Care Act, better known as ObamaCare. "This book is dedicated to both the tens of thousands of government workers who either participated in creating the 20,000 pages of law and regulations of ObamaCare, or will be involved in implementing and enforcing the law as well as the millions of individuals and families in the United States who will be part of this social experiment," Silver writes.
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SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
SO FAR, Jordan Matthews is the star of Eagles' organized team activities. We could spend the next several paragraphs issuing disclaimers about practicing without pads and/or contact, and about how much Chip Kelly feels his 6-3, 212-pound, second-round rookie wide receiver from Vanderbilt still needs to learn, but that would be kind of boring. We'll get to all that later. First, here's what NFL Network analyst Brian Baldinger had to say after watching Matthews yesterday, on a steamy afternoon in South Philly that saw Matthews catch four passes in a row during a seven-on-seven drill.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | By Bob Wegbreit
*Disclaimer: This article is meant to be read as satire. NORTH PHILADELPHIA, Morgan Hall - Temple University announced today that the school would eliminate seven academic majors in a cost-cutting move. The announcement came after the elimination of seven varsity sports. The majors targeted are English, American Studies, Geology, French, Environmental Studies, Social Work, and Political Science. Students and faculty received little notice of the cuts. Students majoring in the disciplines slated for closure will be given the choice of switching majors or transferring at the end of the semester.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
HE HAD ME at the dedication. Don Silver, a personal-finance author, has written an e-book to help explain the Affordable Care Act, better known as ObamaCare. "This book is dedicated to both the tens of thousands of government workers who either participated in creating the 20,000 pages of law and regulations of ObamaCare, or will be involved in implementing and enforcing the law as well as the millions of individuals and families in the United States who will be part of this social experiment," Silver writes.
SPORTS
January 6, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an assist from a federal mediator, the NHL and the players' union appear to be inching closer to a settlement that would end their lengthy labor dispute, bring players back from Europe, and start a shortened season in less than two weeks. If an agreement is reached by Friday, a 48-game season would start Jan. 19, with teams likely playing a conference-only schedule. After both sides talked separately Saturday morning with federal mediator Scot Beckenbaugh in New York City, the parties got together near 1 p.m. - the first time they had met in the same room since negotiations broke down early Thursday morning.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012
BUZZING hockey cathedrals. Or boring courtrooms. Sticks and sweaters. Or gavels and robes. Stars enforced by knuckles. Or suits protected by security. This week, with litigation in the air, we will have a better idea which way this 93-day NHL lockout is heading. The hope of a shortened season will either rest in the hands of the players or the hands of a federal judge in New York. Beginning on Sunday, every NHL player was given access to a ballot to vote whether to give its executive board the power to file a "disclaimer of interest," which would dissolve their union in order to fight the legality of the lockout in court.
NEWS
May 11, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I love the man. I'm in awe of his fabulosity. But sometimes you gotta Speak Truth to Diddy: Pay up and get it over with, dude. The New York Supreme Court has declined to hear Sean "Diddy" Combs' appeal of a lower-court decision last year ordering him to pay ex-g.f. Misa Hylton-Brim $19,000 a month in child support for their son Justin, 12. That order came after Diddy appealed a Westchester Family Court ruling that he should pay $35,000 a month. Hylton-Brim has complained Diddy makes much higher child support payments to model Kim Porter for their son, Christian.
NEWS
February 20, 2002 | By Wendy Ginsberg INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just hours before a meeting that could determine the fate of a controversial borough well, the state Department of Environmental Protection released a report saying that shutting off the well "is in the public interest. " The well, at Maple Avenue and Cooper Road in adjoining Berlin Township, has caused acrimony almost since it began pumping 45 million gallons a month in 1997 less than a half-mile from protected wetlands and sensitive habitat. State-mandated tests later proved the well was draining water from a stream that once flowed through the yards of Evesham residents.
SPORTS
October 11, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Australian swimmers competing in next month's World Cup and U.S. Open in New York have been asked to sign disclaimers preventing Australian Swimming Inc. from being sued if they are injured or killed in a terrorist attack. "We simply could not get any insurance company to cover us in this regard," Vena Murray, executive director of Australian Swimming, said today. "If the swimmers are hit by a New York taxi, they're covered. But if they're hurt in a terrorist attack, they're not. " Brooke Hanson, one of 13 Australians scheduled to compete in the World Cup, which runs Nov. 27 and 28, said she had received the disclaimer form and intended to sign it. "That freaked me out a bit," Hanson said.
NEWS
August 13, 2001 | By Janet Paskin INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Odd, maybe, but racism wasn't the first thing that came to Wiley Fuller's mind seven years ago when he heard that two men had tried to set fire to a cross on his lawn. Fuller, who is black, first worried about his baby granddaughter asleep inside his home, and then he wondered: What if the whole house had caught on fire? The Pemberton Township police thought it was a hate crime, but Fuller said it was slightly more complicated than that. The grass cross was one that he had landscaped into his lawn in the township's Browns Mills section in 1980.
NEWS
August 24, 1997 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suddenly, they're everywhere, those mega-vitamin-herb pills and other dietary supplements that claim to boost, balance, enhance, cleanse, uplift or otherwise benefit every bodily organ and function you can imagine. Once available mostly in health food stores, they're now sold and ballyhooed in grocery and drug stores, on radio and TV, through direct mail and major magazines, and on the Internet. Americans, hungry for age-old "natural" remedies, can't seem to get enough supplements, many with suggestive names such as Cardio, Prostate, PMS Escape, Happy Camper, LDL-Lite and Sinus Ease.
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