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Disclosure

BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 1992. President Bush took America's top auto executives to Tokyo, where he complained that they could not compete against their Japanese counterparts, who made half as much money. Bush's remarks, which draw wide criticism from shareholders' groups and even some business leaders, were the culmination of a series of events that prompted the Securities and Exchange Commission to broaden disclosure about executive pay. The corporate raids of the 1980s revealed that many companies were being run into the ground by executives with fat pay packages.
NEWS
November 26, 1996
From armed robberies to a student's shooting to the Halloween stabbing death of a talented researcher, there's been a scary spike in high-profile crimes around the West Philadelphia campus of the University of Pennsylvania. So it's ironic, at best, to see how the university contorts the facts to paint a far more tranquil picture when it reports campus crimes under federal and state disclosure laws. As Inquirer staff writer Michael Matza reported yesterday, fully 90 percent of the 1995 robberies that occurred in the area patrolled by Penn's security force were omitted from the campus-crime reports.
NEWS
February 4, 2006 | By Amy Worden and Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Signaling the state House may act soon to adopt lobbying reform, Speaker John M. Perzel asked the state Supreme Court yesterday for guidance in crafting a law that would withstand legal scrutiny. In doing so, Perzel (R., Phila.) is apparently removing the biggest roadblock to reform - himself - which, his critics say, has made Pennsylvania the only state without a lobbying-disclosure law. In the letter yesterday, Perzel asked Supreme Court Chief Justice Ralph Cappy for the high court's input "to assure, to every extent possible, proposed legislation is considerate of the Court's position on this matter.
NEWS
September 23, 2000
Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Jon S. Corzine needs to come clean in a public way with New Jersey voters soon. This is not to suggest that he's dirty, in the sense of corrupt. But his unconvincing evasions about his investment portfolio and donations by his charitable foundation are creating blotches on the nearly blank slate he presents as a person who's never held public office. Mr. Corzine continues to dodge demands by his Republican opponent, U.S. Rep. Bob Franks, that he make a full disclosure of his tax returns.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1990 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush's nominee to be top regulator of the nation's sinking savings and loan industry told the FBI and the White House earlier this month that he used marijuana and cocaine in the early 1970s, the Treasury Department confirmed last night. The disclosure came hours after T. Timothy Ryan Jr. narrowly won Senate Banking Committee approval by an 11-10 vote, even though the senators had been told of his drug use. Still, the admission seemed certain to make an already tough confirmation fight even tougher for Ryan, an attorney who had been strongly criticized for his lack of financial industry experience.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | By Al Patrick and Marla Gold
One of the greatest barriers to fighting AIDS is that people react strongly, often irrationally, to the way in which someone contracted the disease, as opposed to the disease itself. When celebrities make public their HIV-positive diagnosis, the subsequent media attention does not - as in the case of most other celebrity announcements - raise awareness and promote better understanding of the disease. Health announcements by Phillie's first baseman John Kruk, for example, filled the airwaves and print media with charts about testicular cancer and guidelines for prevention and self-exam.
NEWS
June 17, 2003 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Like many Americans, area members of the House of Representatives are simply not as wealthy as they once were, according to their annual financial disclosure reports. They are still financially well-off. Their salaries of $150,000 a year as members of the House would guarantee as much. But, as have millions of Americans, they have seen their stock portfolios decline dramatically following the collapse of the economic boom of the 1990s. Rep. H. James Saxton (R., N.J.), for example, reported assets valued between $211,034 and $646,000.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Montgomery County U.S. Rep. Joseph M. Hoeffel 3d still collects deferred payments from law cases he handled before he was elected from the 13th District in 1998. Chester County's U.S. Rep. Joseph R. Pitts received $85,670 from a state pension. Delaware County's U.S. Rep. Curt Weldon earned an extra $10,000 teaching a Widener University course. Bucks County's U.S. Rep. James C. Greenwood received $5,448 in a pension from the state legislature. On the whole, there was little change last year in the financial status of the suburban delegation, according to disclosure forms they filed this spring.
NEWS
September 30, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just days after a crackdown on corporate polluters, a separate state Department of Environmental Protection proposal was criticized yesterday for fear it could let some of those companies off the hook. The department's self-disclosure policy, introduced in late August, would reduce penalties for businesses that discover and then voluntarily report and correct violations. Companies detecting an infraction within 21 days would fill out a form on the DEP's Web site to report it, making the companies eligible for a full penalty waiver for minor violations.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Local public officials have to do it. State legislators do, too. And beginning next year, judges in New Jersey will join the legions of officials across the state who must file annual disclosure forms outlining their sources of income as well as any gifts, bonuses and royalties they received. The judiciary had been exempt from New Jersey laws that require most public servants to file the forms so the public can assess their financial activities - and pinpoint any possible conflicts of interest.
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