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Disclosure

NEWS
July 26, 1991 | BY MARTIN T. ORNE, From the New York Times
Few would dispute that a patient's right to confidentiality survives death, but what about a patient's right to disclosure? In the case of an artist or public figure, issues of posthumous disclosure arise again and again. I would suggest that patients' right to disclose their conversations with their therapists also survives death, but here the issue is more complex. If a patient has consented to release all psychiatric records to a biographer, does the deceased patient's family have any rights to privacy?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Forget the statistics. Forget that in real life, women are more typically the victims of sexual harassment than the perpetrators. Forget that only 10 percent of sexual harassment complaints are filed by men against their colleagues, although in Hollywood - as seen in the recent academic drama Oleanna and the new techno-thriller Disclosure - it's 100 percent. Forget this because Disclosure is 200 percent the most purely entertaining film of the season. This witty, wily battle between genders is not so much about sexual harassment as it is about power politics in the workplace, where water-cooler gossip is replaced by E-mail, and where memo warfare is waged by combatants in virtual-reality goggles.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's disclosure requirements for trash moguls leak like a sieve. People who set up waste disposal businesses in the state are required by law to answer a lot of questions - but not enough questions, some officials say. So when Carmine Franco went into the trash business in Southwest Philadelphia in 1986, he flew in under the radar set up by state law to screen trash figures with criminal records. Neither his name, nor the 1982 anti-trust conviction that got him thrown out of the waste business in New Jersey, has ever turned up on disclosure forms used by the Department of Environmental Resources in weighing approval for waste disposal businesses.
NEWS
May 18, 1993 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SPS Technologies Inc. has agreed to pay the U.S. government $2.5 million to settle allegations that it failed to make required tests on nuts, bolts and other fasteners sold to NASA and the Defense Department for aircraft engines and parts. The settlement was announced yesterday by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, closing an investigation that SPS itself had started under the government's "voluntary disclosure" program. The program encourages self- policing by government contractors.
NEWS
March 17, 2006 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A challenger to veteran State Rep. Babette Josephs (D., Phila.) wants the courts to bar her from the May Democratic primary because of an incomplete financial-disclosure statement. Larry Farnese argued that Josephs violated a state ethics law by not listing specifics about her income on the statement that accompanies candidate nominating petitions. "This race can be won in the street - I just want the street to be clean," said Farnese, 37, a lawyer. "It's a matter of public disclosure, so potential conflicts of interest can be identified.
NEWS
April 12, 2005 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commonwealth Court ruled yesterday that former Philadelphia judge John Braxton can remain on the Democratic primary ballot for city controller despite having filed an incomplete financial-disclosure form. In a terse statement, a three-judge panel of the appeals court affirmed a March 24 decision by the Common Pleas Court that Braxton could amend his ethics statement because he made no malicious attempt to conceal the sources of his income. State Rep. Alan Butkovitz (D., Phila.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
RE the letter on abortion disclosure: You can't have it both ways. Either a woman has the right not to inform her husband when she plans to terminate a pregnancy, or she has the right to have the man's assets disclosed because the child needs to be supported. You father it, you support it. By the way, if a man could get pregnant, you can bet your bottom dollar abortions would be available at vending machines for 15 cents a pop. Marie Kahlan, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 4, 2000
Today's primary-day quiz for Pennsylvanians: Can you imagine an issue, other than motherhood or apple pie, that would unite your state's four top elected officials? That group consists of Gov. Ridge and three people who are angling to succeed him. There's Democratic Auditor General Robert P. Casey Jr., whose reports regularly blast the Republican governor. Treasurer Barbara Hafer and Attorney General Mike Fisher are Republicans who have run for governor before and may well try again in '02. Yet last week, these political rivals all endorsed tougher rules for disclosing the outside financial interests of state lawmakers - a titanically overdue reform that legislative leaders and many rank-and-filers have resisted.
NEWS
September 29, 2010 | By Adrienne Lu, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When former New Jersey Sen. Wayne Bryant filed his financial-disclosure statements from 2004 to 2006, he listed his law firm, Zeller & Bryant, as a source of earned income. But Bryant did not have to reveal that his firm received $192,000 in retainer fees during that period from an influential Bergen County law firm. An indictment filed Monday in federal court charges that while those fees were purportedly for legal work relating to a Meadowlands project, they actually were bribes in exchange for the senator's support of the law firm's clients' development projects, including proposals to redevelop Petty's Island and Cramer Hill in Camden.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A top Rendell administration official has not filed financial-disclosure statements required by the state and the city, claiming an exemption because he does not draw a salary from the city treasury. Deputy Mayor Herbert Vederman said yesterday that he got approval from Mayor Rendell's chief of staff, David L. Cohen, not to file the reports on his personal financial holdings because he works without pay or benefits from the city. The deadline for filing those reports passed well over a month ago and was met by most of the members of the Rendell administration; some members received extensions.
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