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Disclosure

BUSINESS
September 18, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Cass R. Sunstein , the Harvard Law polymath who annoyed business and activists in his three-year ride as Obama's White House regulatory chief and the author of The World According to Star Wars and heavier-thinking books, is a prescient student of our digital way of talking. As I noted in my 2004 book Comcasted , while Web evangelists were still idealizing online as the place to tie our world into one big friendly village, Sunstein worried it was ghettoizing into "echo chambers" where we avoid people we disagree with, sharpen prejudices, and abandon standards of evidence.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | Letter to the Editor
The Daily News' April 6 editorial, "Hush, Doctors: Gas industry gags physicians" is false and shows a lack of understanding by the Daily News and Sen. Leach of Act 13's disclosure provisions. Some due diligence would have revealed that Act 13 contains one of the nation's most forward-thinking disclosure requirements. Our law, which provides for disclosure through the publicly accessible online database known as FracFocus.org, was modeled after Colorado's new law. The Colorado law was embraced by a broad spectrum of environmental groups, such as the Environmental Defense Fund.
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams apologized to his staff Friday for any distractions created by the "adverse publicity" that has surrounded his disclosure of thousands of dollars in previously unreported gifts. "I understand and recognize that each of you works very hard to represent the commonwealth with integrity and honor," he wrote in an email obtained by the Inquirer and Daily News. "The adverse publicity about me during this past week has likely made it more difficult for you to do that.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert A. Childs, staff director of the city's Minority Business Enterprise Council, waited more than a month to disclose that his sister had a financial interest in a city contract that he helped design, city records show. Childs' sister, Brenda Murray, was named as a "sublicensee" to operate a concession stand under a contract for concession services at Veterans Stadium. The contract was awarded Dec. 17 to a joint venture consisting of Ogden Food Services Corp. and Clarence Farmer, a member of the City Human Relations Commission.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
The challenge of detecting child abuse will be the focus of a free training session May 13 in Chester County. The Crime Victims' Center of Chester County will offer a seminar on mandated reporting issues from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Temenos Retreat Center in West Bradford Township. The grant-funded program, "Recognizing, Responding, and Reporting: What Every Professional Should Know about Child Abuse," is open to any professionals who work with children, including those who live or work outside the county.
NEWS
November 7, 2012
The day after President Obama's reelection is a good time to reflect on how the campaign was affected by a tragically flawed Supreme Court decision and others that undermined efforts to add some common sense to political spending. This is the day after more than $6 billion was spent on election campaigns, with much of it coming from barely restrained and often secretive groups. Most of that money went to TV advertising that was generally negative and further served to erode the public's confidence not only in the candidates put before it, but also in an electoral system that is supposed to be the model for the rest of the world.
NEWS
June 10, 1986
Come on now. Do they think we're complete idiots? Are we really expected to believe that Christopher Smith, a United States representative from New Jersey, has no assets (as reported in the May 27 article on financial disclosure by House members)? A man in that position must own something, at least the clothes he wears when the House is in session. Or does he report to work naked? Elliot B. Werner Wynnewood.
NEWS
November 22, 2004
THE HIRING of Councilman Juan Ramos' 19-year-old daughter as an assistant managing director of the city last week was a brilliant move . . . to underscore how critical ethics legislation is - right now. Did a 19-year-old who is still in college use her father's influence to help get a plum job? It's hard to assume otherwise, demonstrating how the perception of bad behavior and the reality of it are so intricately linked. But if she used her father's position, would it actually be wrong?
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | Inquirer Washington Bureau
Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D., Vt.) revealed yesterday that he was the source of the unauthorized disclosure in January of a draft Senate intelligence committee report on the Iran-contra affair and said he resigned from the panel as a result. In an unusual statement, Leahy said he had allowed a reporter, whom he did not identify, to look at the report and that he did not realize at the time that the action might lead to the document's disclosure. The statement said that after Leahy realized that he was the source of the disclosure, he "was angry with himself for carelessly allowing the press person to examine the unclassified draft and to be alone with it" and resigned from the committee as a sign of "his own regret.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Individual members of the Strawbridge & Clothier families have indicated they have "no intention of accepting the offer" of New York investor Ronald Baron to buy two-thirds of the outstanding shares in the retailing chain, Francis R. Strawbridge said yesterday. Baron on Monday launched a takeover effort offering $60 per share cash, a total of $249.6 million, for at least 4.1 million shares, about two-thirds of the outstanding stock in the company. Strawbridge's officials said they have not held a board of directors meeting since the tender offer.
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