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Disclosure

NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two weeks before the city's new lobbying disclosure ordinance is scheduled to take effect, the Philadelphia Bar Association says the regulations go much farther than they should and wants lawyers to be clearly exempted. "It regulates conduct that most people would not consider lobbying," the association's chancellor, Rudolph Garcia, said Wednesday after testifying before the city Board of Ethics. "To me, lobbying is where someone's trying to influence policy," he continued, "not where someone's trying to . . . deal with a dispute or get a permit or do anything that people do interacting with the city on a day-to-day basis.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The federal government on Thursday began testing simplified disclosure forms designed to help borrowers find the mortgage that's right for them. Consumers and lenders will test two prototypes, but both do the thing - consolidate two federally required disclosure forms into a simpler one. The forms will be given to consumers who have just applied for a mortgage. They are designed to make the loan's costs and risks clear and let borrowers comparison-shop for the best offer. The two-page prototypes, developed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, combine the Truth in Lending Act mortgage disclosure and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act Good Faith Estimate, given to borrowers within three days of application.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura Olson, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
HARRISBURG - Conference trips to faraway places like China, India, and Ireland. Tickets to pro football games. Passes for pricey receptions and galas. Dinners galore. Even in these belt-tightening times, such gifts and travel are all part of the life of a Pennsylvania legislator, according to the latest statements of financial interest filed with the State Ethics Commission. In annual filings that were due Monday, some elected officials reported no gain in 2010 aside from the paycheck that comes with the job. Others accepted meals, trips, and assorted trinkets.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
The basic checking account is getting a lot more complicated. Banks in the last year have revamped terms to introduce new or hiked fees, change minimum balance requirements and tweak other terms. Now U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D., N.Y) is calling for regulations that would require banks to provide consumers with an easy-to-read one-page disclosure form listing all fees and terms. Schumer is also responsible for the fee and interest rate disclosure form that banks are currently required to provide with credit card offers.
NEWS
May 2, 2011
The challenge of detecting child abuse will be the focus of a free training session May 13 in Chester County. The Crime Victims' Center of Chester County will offer a seminar on mandated reporting issues from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Temenos Retreat Center in West Bradford Township. The grant-funded program, "Recognizing, Responding, and Reporting: What Every Professional Should Know about Child Abuse," is open to any professionals who work with children, including those who live or work outside the county.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Mark Fazlollah and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia Housing Authority told a federal judge Tuesday that its fired director, Carl R. Greene, was engaged in a "shameless tactic" to prevent the agency from giving investigators documents on millions of dollars spent for outside lawyers during his watch. Greene's attorney asked U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody last week to block the PHA in its plans to release six years' worth of legal bills to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development and its independent inspector general.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By David Rising and Randy Herschaft, Associated Press
BERLIN - An FBI report kept secret for 25 years said the Soviet Union "quite likely fabricated" evidence central to the prosecution of John Demjanjuk - a revelation that could help the defense as closing arguments resume Wednesday in the retired Ohio autoworker's Nazi war-crimes trial in Germany. The newly declassified FBI field-office report, obtained by the Associated Press, casts doubt on the authenticity of a Nazi ID card that is the key piece of evidence in allegations that Demjanjuk was a guard at the Sobibor death camp in occupied Poland.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: A friend revealed to me that she is having an affair with a good friend's husband. I wish she had not told me, because it puts me in a very awkward position of keeping this secret both from her husband and the wife whose husband she is smugly sleeping with. I am sensitive to this because some time ago I discovered my own husband's infidelity with another smug woman. As painful as the discovery was for me, we eventually worked things out. A few people eventually told me they were suspicious but afraid to say anything.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The epic battle over accusations that Chevron Corp. polluted a large expanse of the Amazon rain forest played out before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit on Tuesday as the energy giant sought the release of thousands of pages of confidential documents it said could shed light on improper tactics of plaintiffs' attorneys. Lawyers representing Chevron asked the Third Circuit to uphold a lower-court opinion that records be released. They are being held by Philadelphia trial lawyer Joseph Kohn, who for years financed the litigation before withdrawing from the case in November 2009.
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