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Discovery

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NEWS
June 30, 1989 | By Lee Winfrey, Inquirer TV Writer
John S. Hendricks, the founder and chairman of The Discovery Channel, is a role model of American capitalism: a man who had a dream that has made him a millionaire. It is pleasant to report that Hendricks, 37, did not get rich by peddling trash. He has, in the truest sense, done well by doing good. Four-year-old Discovery is offered as part of the basic package by 60 percent of all cable companies, including all three of the companies now cabling Philadelphia. It has 40.2 million subscribers, which makes it the 11th-largest cable channel.
NEWS
August 2, 1993 | by Daniel Mendelsohn, From the New York Times
The startling discovery that affiliation with the Republican party is genetically determined, announced by scientists in the current issue of the journal Nurture, threatens to overshadow last week's announcement by government scientists that there might be a gene for homosexuality in men. Reports of the gene that codes political conservatism, which was discovered after a lengthy study of fundamentalist quintuplets, has already sent shockwaves throughout...
NEWS
January 5, 2003 | By Kathleen Moody FOR THE INQUIRER
The realization that the joy of discovery is not over by any certain age came to me on the mail boat between Great Cranberry and Mount Desert Islands in Maine. During an annual family vacation on Mount Desert, I read a magazine article about a woman who makes jewelry out of sea glass that she's collected since childhood during summers spent with her grandmother on Great Cranberry, where she now has a studio - a fixed-up old bait shack - to which she welcomes visitors. So, when the rest of the clan went fishing one day, I drove to Northeast Harbor and boarded a mail boat for the ride out to the island.
NEWS
May 29, 1999 | By David Harriman
Physics is the fundamental natural science. Its birth in the 17th century heralded man's coming of age as a rational being. The discovery of the basic laws of nature led to the industrial revolution and modern technology. Yet the vast majority of high school graduates never take a course in physics and know almost nothing about the role of the scientific revolution in creating the modern world. While this alone constitutes criminal negligence by educators, there is an even worse crime: The students who do take physics are indoctrinated with a fundamentally false view of science.
NEWS
October 20, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Columbus' "discovery" of the Americas is a Eurocentric concept, but at least now, that Eurocentrism can be understood in a broader context. Five centuries ago, the major civilizations of the world became acquainted with one another because Europeans, motivated more by a hunger for wealth than intellectual curiosity, made the connections. "Circa 1492: Art in the Age of Exploration" at the National Gallery of Art encourages this broader perspective on what is often called the Age of Discovery.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
In addition to redesigning the Discovery for 1999, the Land Rover folks did something much more notable: they redesigned its price - downward. The new English sport-ute's base price is down $850, to $34,150. That 2.5 percent reduction is a remarkable development in an industry in which the price tags usually suffer the annual waistline creep of a career couch potato. The Land Rover Discovery, for those who don't regularly watch the popular sport-ute opera, Days of Our Four-Wheel-Drives, is the down-market version of the Range Rover, which starts at a sinus-clearing $58,000.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
People living in the Philadelphia area will get a rare chance to see the space shuttle Discovery tomorrow and Monday, if they get out of bed early enough and the skies are clear. "It will appear as a small white dot moving across the sky at a pretty good clip," said Kelly Humphries, a NASA spokesman at the Johnson Space Center. "It will be visible to the naked eye and will look like a small star moving fast. " Flying on board the Discovery is Guion Bluford Jr., a Philadelphia native.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2013 | By David Bauder, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Cupcake makers, pawnbrokers, and storage-container raiders have all had their moments in reality television's spotlight. Now the time may be right for marijuana growers - and the people who chase them. The Discovery network debuts a six-episode series, Weed Country , at 10 p.m. Wednesday and will replace it with Pot Cops in April. Both examine the marijuana trade in northern California. It fits Discovery's efforts to introduce interesting subcultures to viewers, said Nancy Daniels, the network's executive vice president for production and development on the West Coast.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The discovery of several trash bags containing a decapitated goat and birds, along with dolls and other possibly cult-related articles, in Tacony Creek Park this week has prompted an investigation by the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. "This looks like something that was being used for some type of ritual," said Elaine Skypala, the SPCA's director of operations. "Our agents are going door to door in the area" to determine whether anyone heard sounds of animals being tortured or killed.
SPORTS
August 12, 1989 | By Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Lanard Copeland, an obscure, undrafted big guard from Georgia State, has become the latest benefactor of a quirk in the collective bargaining agreement between the NBA and its players association. That is because the 76ers yesterday signed the 6-6 Copeland to a 1989-90 contract that is believed to include at least a modest guarantee. In effect, his undrafted status placed him in a better negotiating position than Reggie Cross and Toney Mack, the team's second-round picks, who apparently will be offered nothing beyond the standard $110,000 make-good deals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The path to David Casarett's new book began when one of his patients at Penn Medicine's Wissahickon Hospice asked him if medical marijuana could help her. As usual with such questions, he scoffed, telling her the drug was still illegal and there was no evidence to support its use. His patient, a retired English professor, pushed him for more information. He discovered that there was indeed research, and she knew more about it than he did. "She was tough," he said. He promised he would look into it for her. That was about a year and a half ago. The result of his quest - Stoned: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana - was published last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Don't look for light cinematic fare for the opening Tuesday of the Philadelphia gay film festival qFLIX. Its second annual iteration, which runs through Sunday, will lead with a moody romantic drama, Beautiful Something , set here and shot by local director Joseph Graham. And the weighty stuff continues, with documentaries whose titles speak to global LGBT struggles, among them A Sinner in Mecca andthe savage, Ugandan-made Outed: The Painful Reality . One film being buzzed about in Philadelphia's gay community, however, has a comic streak as wide as the United States: Be Who You Are , a deceptively simple, charming, buoyant documentary to premiere at 7 p.m. Thursday at Prince Music Theater.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They've found musket balls and shell fragments, the expected refuse of battle. Archaeologists and volunteers combing the grounds of the Red Bank Battlefield this month have unearthed at least 150 artifacts, about 50 of them tied to the crucial Revolutionary War fight 238 years ago. But they have also discovered objects with a more personal, human connection, said Wade Catts, regional cultural director of JMA, a division of Commonwealth Cultural...
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
AS A YOUNGSTER growing up in King of Prussia with a fascination for science and math, Jayatri Das enjoyed spending time at the Franklin Institute. As with many Philadelphia-area students, walking through the giant heart made an impression on her. Today, Jayatri Das, Ph.D., is chief bioscientist at the institute, where she led the team that created the museum's largest exhibit, Your Brain, which opened last June. Tonight, Das will be among four women scientists to be spotlighted in the fifth annual "Color of Science" program at the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court ruled Tuesday that Discovery Charter School in West Philadelphia can appeal to the state its case for adding students because the Philadelphia School Reform Commission refused to vote on the school's expansion request. The three-judge panel sent the case back to the state Charter Appeal Board, which said in April 2014 that it had no jurisdiction because the SRC had never acted on the school's request for an amendment. Commonwealth Court said that the SRC's inaction constituted a denial and that Discovery had the right to present its case to the appeals board.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
HARD TO BELIEVE that an item about an anaconda is leading Tattle and Nicki Minaj is nowhere to be found. But on Dec. 7, Discovery will air a show called "Eaten Alive," in which Paul Rosolie will be, uh, eaten alive by a snake. Well, he won't actually be eaten alive, since (spoiler alert) he will still be alive at the end of the show. Talk about a manwich. The Washington Post , which regularly deals with more snakes than perhaps any newspaper, reports that Rosolie accomplished the feat wearing a "custom-built snake-proof suit," covering himself in pig's blood to make himself appetizing.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Construction of a built-in pool in a charming section of Riverton came to a "screaming" stop when a worker discovered a human skull Monday afternoon. Tuesday, the normally quiet riverfront neighborhood with turn-of-the century mansions was transformed into a crime scene with police, detectives, and an anthropologist studying what appeared to be particularly old remains. How old? Joel Bewley, spokesman for the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, could only say "very" old until experts do a thorough analysis to determine the age, gender, identity, and cause of death, and how the skeletal remains got to the spot about six feet deep in the 600 block of Bank Avenue.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacquelyn Y. Kelley, 60, of Philadelphia, founder and CEO of Discovery Charter School, died Sunday, June 1, of an infection at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mrs. Kelley was a gifted educator and entrepreneur who devoted her life to the city's schoolchildren. "She had a vision, and she made sure she saw it all the way through," said her daughter, Kimberly S. Kelley. Mrs. Kelley rose through the ranks in the Philadelphia School District before becoming chief instructional officer for a start-up charter school.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
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