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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
TURN BACK NOW, herpetophobes. That means you, people afraid of snakes and reptiles. Robert Keszey , the star of Discovery Channel's "Swamp Brothers," was found guilty of conspiracy to traffic in state- and federally protected reptiles in U.S. District Court here in Philadelphia. Keszey was convicted along with Robroy MacInnes , his partner at Glades Herp Farm Inc., of trafficking in protected timber rattlesnakes in violation of the Lacey Act. "Swamp Brothers," the 2011 Discovery show, features Keszey and his brother Stephen Keszey legally selling snakes at the Glades Herp Farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Danielle Paquette, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - After a quarter-century of dorsal fins and drinking games, Shark Week remains a strange and celebrated event. The annual Discovery Channel lineup, which attacks again Sunday, snared more than 26 million viewers last summer. The tradition began in 1988, when Discovery aired a week's worth of shark-oriented programming in hopes of drawing viewers in a slow summer week. It worked: According to Brooke Runnette, the network's executive producer for special projects, the series' 1988 premiere doubled Discovery's prime-time average, launching a 24-year streak of increasingly high yearly ratings.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | By Kristi Nelson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Carl Vinson, a massive aircraft carrier measuring about 244 feet tall from keel to mast, is shown on film moving at a steady clip, its hull slicing through the deep Pacific, tossing small mountains of water to each side as it makes its way toward the Persian Gulf. Among the 5,800 men on board is Navy Lt. Tom "Slim" Pickett, pilot of an F/A-18C Hornet, former Chesterbrook resident, 1986 Conestoga High School graduate, and now feature player in a TV show. Pickett and his jet can be seen zooming through the Discovery Channel documentary Carrier: Fortress at Sea, which debuted on the cable channel March 5 and encored Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013
WITH THE creation of its new naked reality show, "Naked and Afraid," the Discovery Channel has made the creators of "Jersey Shore" look like Martin Scorsese. The show's premise is simple. The producers pick a man and a woman and drop them naked in the middle of nowhere, and give them 21 days to get to a predetermined extraction point. Judging by the publicity photo featuring a mud-slathered couple trying their best to look like Neanderthals, I'm sure it's a rip-roarin' good time.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
British television's Antiques Roadshow, the best program ever made about antiques, has arrived in America. Last week, the cable Discovery Channel began broadcasting the show and is scheduled to continue the program Monday through Friday at 1:30 p.m. for 52 weeks. The Roadshow, now in its 13th year, is already part of British folklore. It is watched regularly by nearly 15 million viewers, more than tune in to any regularly scheduled daytime show except for the most popular soap operas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2011
Who: The silent half of comic-intellectual illusionist duo Penn & Teller, whose show, "Penn & Teller Tell a Lie," premiered last week on the Discovery Channel and airs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays. Age: 63. From: Born at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Grew up on tiny Summer Street near Hahnemann University Hospital. Schooled at Friends Select, then City Center, then Masterman, then Central. Now: Has lived for nearly two decades in Las Vegas, performing 46 weeks a year with his larger and more garrulous sidekick in a theater named for them at the Rio. Back in the day: "I've been interested in magic since age 5," he has said, in a voice rarely heard in his own theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
If you grew up thinking that famous Indian fighter Kit Carson was a hero, the new cable television documentary How the West Was Lost wants to give you the new, politically correct view. White men haven't been bashed this bad out west since the Battle of Little Bighorn. How the West Was Lost, premiering at 10 p.m. tomorrow on the Discovery Channel, is the reverse side of an old movie, How the West Was Won (1963), in which such screen stalwarts as Gregory Peck, Henry Fonda and James Stewart civilized the frontier.
LIVING
December 15, 2000 | By Rashod D. Ollison, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christopher Lowell is not his usual exuberant self. He is cordial and chatty, but not exactly bubbling over. The Emmy-winning host of The Christopher Lowell Show, Discovery Channel's highly rated how-to-unlock-your-creativity-and-decorate-your-home program, sits tastefully dressed in black. He sips the frothy cappuccino before him and lights a cigarette. He is tired. Taking a quick drag, he says matter-of-factly, "I've signed 40,000 books in the last three weeks, and the book has gone into its third printing in four weeks.
SPORTS
February 17, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Still hungry to race but wary he is not in the best shape, Lance Armstrong wants to take his Tour de France record to even mightier heights: He will try for a seventh straight title this summer. Armstrong had left open the possibility he wouldn't compete this year in cycling's showcase event to pursue other races. But in an announcement yesterday on the Web site of his Discovery Channel team, the Tour's only six-time winner said he will again commit himself to the race to which he's dedicated his cycling life.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
When the Richard M. Nixon Library opened on July 20, 1990, in Yorba Linda, Calif., a Boy Scout attending the ceremony was asked what he thought about the president's involvement in Watergate. "Everybody makes mistakes," replied the teen-ager, a conservative lad who wasn't even alive when the president resigned. Four years later, kids don't know Watergate from a waterslide, and adults who followed the events seem to have lost themselves in the fog bank of O.J. Simpson stories.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
HARD TO BELIEVE that an item about an anaconda is leading Tattle and Nicki Minaj is nowhere to be found. But on Dec. 7, Discovery will air a show called "Eaten Alive," in which Paul Rosolie will be, uh, eaten alive by a snake. Well, he won't actually be eaten alive, since (spoiler alert) he will still be alive at the end of the show. Talk about a manwich. The Washington Post , which regularly deals with more snakes than perhaps any newspaper, reports that Rosolie accomplished the feat wearing a "custom-built snake-proof suit," covering himself in pig's blood to make himself appetizing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
TURN BACK NOW, herpetophobes. That means you, people afraid of snakes and reptiles. Robert Keszey , the star of Discovery Channel's "Swamp Brothers," was found guilty of conspiracy to traffic in state- and federally protected reptiles in U.S. District Court here in Philadelphia. Keszey was convicted along with Robroy MacInnes , his partner at Glades Herp Farm Inc., of trafficking in protected timber rattlesnakes in violation of the Lacey Act. "Swamp Brothers," the 2011 Discovery show, features Keszey and his brother Stephen Keszey legally selling snakes at the Glades Herp Farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013
WITH THE creation of its new naked reality show, "Naked and Afraid," the Discovery Channel has made the creators of "Jersey Shore" look like Martin Scorsese. The show's premise is simple. The producers pick a man and a woman and drop them naked in the middle of nowhere, and give them 21 days to get to a predetermined extraction point. Judging by the publicity photo featuring a mud-slathered couple trying their best to look like Neanderthals, I'm sure it's a rip-roarin' good time.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* ALL THE PRESIDENT'S MEN REVISITED. 8 p.m. Sunday, Discovery.   ROBERT Redford wasn't exactly itching to return to Watergate. When the Discovery Channel approached the man who'd played Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward in "All the President's Men" about doing a film to commemorate the scandal's sort-of anniversary - it's been almost 41 years since the break-in and not quite 39 since Richard Nixon's resignation - "my first reaction...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2012 | By Danielle Paquette, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - After a quarter-century of dorsal fins and drinking games, Shark Week remains a strange and celebrated event. The annual Discovery Channel lineup, which attacks again Sunday, snared more than 26 million viewers last summer. The tradition began in 1988, when Discovery aired a week's worth of shark-oriented programming in hopes of drawing viewers in a slow summer week. It worked: According to Brooke Runnette, the network's executive producer for special projects, the series' 1988 premiere doubled Discovery's prime-time average, launching a 24-year streak of increasingly high yearly ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2011
Who: The silent half of comic-intellectual illusionist duo Penn & Teller, whose show, "Penn & Teller Tell a Lie," premiered last week on the Discovery Channel and airs at 10 p.m. Wednesdays. Age: 63. From: Born at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Grew up on tiny Summer Street near Hahnemann University Hospital. Schooled at Friends Select, then City Center, then Masterman, then Central. Now: Has lived for nearly two decades in Las Vegas, performing 46 weeks a year with his larger and more garrulous sidekick in a theater named for them at the Rio. Back in the day: "I've been interested in magic since age 5," he has said, in a voice rarely heard in his own theater.
SPORTS
February 17, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Still hungry to race but wary he is not in the best shape, Lance Armstrong wants to take his Tour de France record to even mightier heights: He will try for a seventh straight title this summer. Armstrong had left open the possibility he wouldn't compete this year in cycling's showcase event to pursue other races. But in an announcement yesterday on the Web site of his Discovery Channel team, the Tour's only six-time winner said he will again commit himself to the race to which he's dedicated his cycling life.
LIVING
December 15, 2000 | By Rashod D. Ollison, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christopher Lowell is not his usual exuberant self. He is cordial and chatty, but not exactly bubbling over. The Emmy-winning host of The Christopher Lowell Show, Discovery Channel's highly rated how-to-unlock-your-creativity-and-decorate-your-home program, sits tastefully dressed in black. He sips the frothy cappuccino before him and lights a cigarette. He is tired. Taking a quick drag, he says matter-of-factly, "I've signed 40,000 books in the last three weeks, and the book has gone into its third printing in four weeks.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1998 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Discovery Channel rolled out its Discovery News program in April, it was trumpeted as the only prime-time news show focused on science. Equally interesting was what the promoters didn't advertise: Discovery News is one of the first U.S. television shows to be regularly produced on a set that isn't really there - a virtual set. "In a virtual set, the only thing that's real is the talent and one desk, and everything else is a creation of a computer," said Bob Reid, the show's executive producer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1997 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER
It couldn't be any more official. Even NASA is proclaiming NBC's mini-series Asteroid (tonight and tomorrow night at 9 on Channel 10) a disaster. Though he had not yet seen a preview tape of Asteroid, David Morrison, chair of the NASA Spaceguard Survey Working Group, had read the plot synopsis offered by NBC and found it woefully short on scientific value. Asteroid begins with a Colorado astronomer, Dr. Lily McKee (Annabella Sciorra, the vixen of Jungle Fever), working far from the rest of the scientific world, alone with her computers and telescopes, discovering that a comet has dislodged some giant asteroids from their orbits, thus throwing them on a collision course with Earth - specifically heading straight for Kansas City in just a few days.
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