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Discrimination

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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office has concluded that there is no basis for a racial discrimination claim in Morrisville that the office had been investigating since April. Isabell Carter, who is black, accused Morrisville Borough of discrimination when it sought to evict her and her three daughters from a rented house, citing borough codes requiring more space for four people. On Monday, Carter said she was no longer worrying about whether discrimination was key to the problems with her house, which she and her daughters moved into on March 9. "I'm just content that I'm here, that we have a house," Carter said during a telephone interview.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Inspector Joseph O'Connor said he was flabbergasted when he saw a former friend and officer on national television, claiming that O'Connor was an anti-semitic bigot who threatened his life and career. The ex-buddy, Mark Goldberg, a retired police officer, sued O'Connor, the city and three other supervisors, alleging ethnic intimidation and religious discrimination. He sought more than $500,000 in lost pay and damages. Yesterday, a federal court judge threw out Goldberg's claim and vindicated O'Connor and his fellow officers.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
I have no doubts about whether Sonia Sotomayor will be confirmed for the Supreme Court by the Senate. I do have doubts about her judgment, particularly on the Ricci v. DeStefano firefighter case. In short, New Haven, Conn., offered a test for promotions to lieutenant and captain. Some firefighters passed the written test, and some didn't - whites, blacks, and Hispanics in both groups. Per city charter and union rules, promotions were to go to those with the highest test scores, combined with results of oral interviews.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Haverford College astronomy professor Bruce Partridge thinks about cultural diversity in the natural sciences, he recalls the contributions of the ancient Mayan Indians to the study of the stars. Those early astronomers built elaborate observatories out of stone, developed a table to count the days of the year, and plotted solar eclipses. Partridge believes that such cultural information should be built into any liberal arts education. He is hoping that under a new curricular policy adopted by the college's faculty last month, the Quaker institution will do just that.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Borough officials say they are just enforcing the town zoning rules. But residents of a group home on Vassar Avenue say the 18 zoning violations filed against them last summer are a form of discrimination. The eight women are all recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. They say they feel the borough wants them to move because of their past addictions and that Audubon is using an underhanded way to get them out of town by contending that their home does not comply with residential zoning standards.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was another day of discord in the seventh-floor courtroom, and the lawyers were once again huddled with the judge and arguing about testimony in the sex-discrimination case brought by the city's first female homicide detective. Attorney Richard A. Sprague, who represents the detective and four male colleagues, wanted U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d to hold the city's attorney, Richard G. Freeman, in contempt of court. And the judge came close to doing so. "You have debased this tribunal by your injection of often misleading views to this jury.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Call it proof that progress is sometimes perverse. Meaning Eddie Jordan, district attorney for Orleans Parish in Louisiana. First black D.A. in New Orleans' history. That's the progress. Here's the perverse: Soon after he took office in January 2003, Jordan fired 53 white employees en masse and replaced them all with blacks. Last week, a federal court ruled that he committed racial discrimination against 43 of those workers. A jury of eight whites and two blacks ordered the D.A. to pay $1.9 million in back pay and damages.
SPORTS
January 7, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal appeals court yesterday rejected a sex-discrimination claim by former Southern Cal women's basketball coach Marianne Stanley, saying the coach of the men's team had a more demanding job and could be paid more. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refused to reinstate Stanley to the job she had held for four years. Her replacement is former USC all-American Cheryl Miller and the Trojans are ranked 10th in the nation. Stanley, a native of Upper Darby, a graduate of Immaculata and a former coach at Penn and Old Dominion - which won three national titles with her - made $70,000 in salary and housing allowances last season and sought a contract equal to that of men's coach George Raveling, whose won-lost record at Southern Cal was below hers.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
This could be phrased more delicately, but the fact of the matter is that Lauren R. Januz has a real big butt. But that's his business. Or it should be his business, since it is his oversized butt. However, he has chosen to make the size of his hind end a public issue. Januz recently sent a stern letter to the chief executive officer of McDonald's Corp. He sent copies to me and the Minority Rights Division of the U.S. attorney's office. He wrote: "I represent a minority group that is just as visible as blacks, Mexicans, Latins, Asians or women.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doylestown Borough has become the 17th government in Pennsylvania to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. By a unanimous, 9-0 vote, the Borough Council passed a law Monday night protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. The vote drew a standing ovation from several dozen who packed Borough Hall. "This ordinance is a statement that we will no longer treat different groups of people differently," Councilman Don Berk said.
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NEWS
January 21, 2014
AND NOW, just in time for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, another bright idea from the Pennsylvania Legislature. A 10-year-veteran Lancaster County lawmaker wants to amend the state Constitution to free us all from the burdens of anti-discrimination laws. You could say he has a dream. Republican Rep. Gordon Denlinger, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Fiscal Policy, an elder in the Zeltenreich Reformed Church of New Holland, Pa., is circulating a memo seeking co-sponsors for his effort.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a marked shift toward the political center, Gov. Corbett said Tuesday that he would support legislation banning discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing, and public accommodations. Corbett, who has previously staked out conservative positions on social issues, told The Inquirer that he was "coming out in support" of the bill after learning that federal law does not cover discrimination in the state. "I've had people come and talk to me about how they were discriminated against," said Corbett, who served for eight years as the state's attorney general.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
RADNOR - As a major with the Air Force Reserve, John J. Murphy thought his extensive military record would be an asset when he applied to be manager of Radnor Township. Instead, he contends, it cost him the job. Lawyers for Murphy and the township are meeting this week to discuss a possible trial date on Murphy's claims that the Radnor Township Board of Commissioners discriminated against him on the basis of his military service: They didn't hire him, Murphy alleges, because they worried that his commitment to the Reserve would require him to leave town too often.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Inspired by the case of a young man with autism who was denied a place on a heart-transplant waiting list, a Philadelphia legislator will soon begin gathering support for a state bill that would prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities who want organ transplants. Rep. John Sabatina (D., Phila.) plans to introduce "Paul's Law" in honor of Paul Corby of Pottsville, whose mother, Karen, said doctors at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania refused to put him on the heart-transplant list because of his autism.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mount Holly Township on Wednesday settled its nationally watched Mount Holly Gardens housing discrimination dispute by agreeing to build 44 homes in the blighted neighborhood and provide 20 of them to families already living there. All five members of the Township Council, who had campaigned on pledges to resolve the 10-year legal battle, unanimously adopted a set of resolutions to conclude the case. "Today's a happy day," Mayor Richard Dow told the audience of about 60 at the middle school auditorium.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
TO CHRISTINE Flowers: I've just read your piece on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act passed recently by the Senate. And although I agree with the assessment that most liberals try to paint conservatives as uneducated bigots, I cannot follow you as you affirm that offering the right to marriage matters less when it comes to fight discrimination. Changing people's minds to make them accept and not tolerate another often happens when they consider the other to be part of the same group (at least on some level)
NEWS
October 31, 2013
IT'S laughable how people, mostly Republicans, are spending so much time making a big deal about the ease of (or lack of) signing up for the health plan. OK, there are some issues; what's being lost is how eager people are to get some coverage. Then the Republicans tried to spin the registry issues, like, "Obamacare doesn't work. " In reality, the issues with registration just underscore the fact of so many people in need of coverage. The Republicans keep talking about delaying the rollout.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER MERION Two years after spending $210 million to rebuild its two high schools and setting off a redistricting battle that nearly made it to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Lower Merion School District is looking at expanding the schools. District officials say an unforeseen enrollment spike was behind their new plan to convert space in the administration building next to Lower Merion High School into classrooms. That could mean some students from Ardmore and other nearby neighborhoods now bused across the township to Harriton High could elect to attend Lower Merion, essentially what their families sued the district for in 2009.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
To see an art treasure no more With all the horrible and frightening events in today's world, why, I ask myself, does the proposed sale of Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts make me so very sad? Perhaps, because this represents society's callous dismissal of what is quiet and lovely for what is new and momentarily exciting. In art, as in life, what remains treasured is not the flash of the contemporary, but what is finely crafted and meaningful.
NEWS
August 27, 2013
A FEW DAYS before its 50th anniversary, we think of the March on Washington, and the civil-rights movement that it embodied, as a triumph of democracy. In the grand sense, this is true. Protest is by no means exclusive to democracies, but it's more at home in a democratic system than any other. The civil-rights movement extended the promise of democracy to many who had been denied it. But there were also aspects of the movement's victories that could be spun as undemocratic. Many Southern whites decried the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as an imposition of external values on the majorities of residents in their states (the internal value they were protecting, of course, was the right to discriminate)
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