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Discrimination

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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office has concluded that there is no basis for a racial discrimination claim in Morrisville that the office had been investigating since April. Isabell Carter, who is black, accused Morrisville Borough of discrimination when it sought to evict her and her three daughters from a rented house, citing borough codes requiring more space for four people. On Monday, Carter said she was no longer worrying about whether discrimination was key to the problems with her house, which she and her daughters moved into on March 9. "I'm just content that I'm here, that we have a house," Carter said during a telephone interview.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Inspector Joseph O'Connor said he was flabbergasted when he saw a former friend and officer on national television, claiming that O'Connor was an anti-semitic bigot who threatened his life and career. The ex-buddy, Mark Goldberg, a retired police officer, sued O'Connor, the city and three other supervisors, alleging ethnic intimidation and religious discrimination. He sought more than $500,000 in lost pay and damages. Yesterday, a federal court judge threw out Goldberg's claim and vindicated O'Connor and his fellow officers.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Haverford College astronomy professor Bruce Partridge thinks about cultural diversity in the natural sciences, he recalls the contributions of the ancient Mayan Indians to the study of the stars. Those early astronomers built elaborate observatories out of stone, developed a table to count the days of the year, and plotted solar eclipses. Partridge believes that such cultural information should be built into any liberal arts education. He is hoping that under a new curricular policy adopted by the college's faculty last month, the Quaker institution will do just that.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
I have no doubts about whether Sonia Sotomayor will be confirmed for the Supreme Court by the Senate. I do have doubts about her judgment, particularly on the Ricci v. DeStefano firefighter case. In short, New Haven, Conn., offered a test for promotions to lieutenant and captain. Some firefighters passed the written test, and some didn't - whites, blacks, and Hispanics in both groups. Per city charter and union rules, promotions were to go to those with the highest test scores, combined with results of oral interviews.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Borough officials say they are just enforcing the town zoning rules. But residents of a group home on Vassar Avenue say the 18 zoning violations filed against them last summer are a form of discrimination. The eight women are all recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. They say they feel the borough wants them to move because of their past addictions and that Audubon is using an underhanded way to get them out of town by contending that their home does not comply with residential zoning standards.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was another day of discord in the seventh-floor courtroom, and the lawyers were once again huddled with the judge and arguing about testimony in the sex-discrimination case brought by the city's first female homicide detective. Attorney Richard A. Sprague, who represents the detective and four male colleagues, wanted U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d to hold the city's attorney, Richard G. Freeman, in contempt of court. And the judge came close to doing so. "You have debased this tribunal by your injection of often misleading views to this jury.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Call it proof that progress is sometimes perverse. Meaning Eddie Jordan, district attorney for Orleans Parish in Louisiana. First black D.A. in New Orleans' history. That's the progress. Here's the perverse: Soon after he took office in January 2003, Jordan fired 53 white employees en masse and replaced them all with blacks. Last week, a federal court ruled that he committed racial discrimination against 43 of those workers. A jury of eight whites and two blacks ordered the D.A. to pay $1.9 million in back pay and damages.
SPORTS
January 7, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal appeals court yesterday rejected a sex-discrimination claim by former Southern Cal women's basketball coach Marianne Stanley, saying the coach of the men's team had a more demanding job and could be paid more. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refused to reinstate Stanley to the job she had held for four years. Her replacement is former USC all-American Cheryl Miller and the Trojans are ranked 10th in the nation. Stanley, a native of Upper Darby, a graduate of Immaculata and a former coach at Penn and Old Dominion - which won three national titles with her - made $70,000 in salary and housing allowances last season and sought a contract equal to that of men's coach George Raveling, whose won-lost record at Southern Cal was below hers.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
This could be phrased more delicately, but the fact of the matter is that Lauren R. Januz has a real big butt. But that's his business. Or it should be his business, since it is his oversized butt. However, he has chosen to make the size of his hind end a public issue. Januz recently sent a stern letter to the chief executive officer of McDonald's Corp. He sent copies to me and the Minority Rights Division of the U.S. attorney's office. He wrote: "I represent a minority group that is just as visible as blacks, Mexicans, Latins, Asians or women.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doylestown Borough has become the 17th government in Pennsylvania to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. By a unanimous, 9-0 vote, the Borough Council passed a law Monday night protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. The vote drew a standing ovation from several dozen who packed Borough Hall. "This ordinance is a statement that we will no longer treat different groups of people differently," Councilman Don Berk said.
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NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
HERE'S THE THING about Bruce Springsteen: The man has a remarkable knack for doing the right thing in his public life. The bard of America's deindustrialization of the 1970s and '80s, Springsteen has long collected food and made donations to local poverty programs - and then he began to see the connections between the blue-collar struggles he sang about and the politics around him. When an unarmed immigrant named Amadou Diallo was killed by 41 shots...
NEWS
April 6, 2016
By Sue A. Fugate The thought of child sexual abuse stirs emotions of fear and anger in me as a mother of two. The more I hear about this problem, the more troubled I am at its prevalence and the lack of consistency among institutions and governments trying to deal with it. The recent grand jury report about crimes that date back as far as the 1950s in the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown is the latest revelation. I won't pretend to know the pain survivors of abuse experience or the helplessness their families feel, but I do empathize with their suffering and support their need for healing.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, Staff Writer
An IT employee at Vanguard Group, Rebecca Snow asked for a month off in 2013 to care for her dying mother in hospice and her ailing father. Not long after her leave, Snow was fired from her computer systems job, despite 13 years of raises and excellent reviews. Colleagues who took a family leave routinely suffered bad reviews, pay cuts, and firings, Snow alleged in a suit she later filed. Her manager Wanda Kirschbaum urged Snow to take the leave, and was also later fired. "I felt bad because I was the one who encouraged" Snow to take the leave, Kirschbaum said in a deposition for Snow's suit, "because they held it against her. " In November, Snow settled her suit, filed in Charlotte, N.C., where Vanguard has an office, and agreed not to discuss it. Her case is the latest in a string of 20 suits against the $3.4 trillion investment giant, which is based in Malvern.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2016
In 2008 and 2010, Vanguard settled two lawsuits brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission over the firm's alleged racial discrimination against African American employees*. The claims were settled for $500,000 and $300,000. Here is a breakdown of some other suits and an EEOC complaint filed against the company since then:                                   Year                                               Plaintiff(s)
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Brarailty "Rel" Dowdell, an African American filmmaker, claims in a federal lawsuit filed last week that Community College of Philadelphia discriminated against him based on his race and sex by denying him a full-time teaching job as a member of the English department. Dowdell, who has worked for the college for 12 years as an adjunct faculty member, said he made it through initial interviews by the hiring committee and English department in 2005 and 2015. But his suit contends he was stopped both times by then-vice president for academic affairs Judith Gay, an African American, and Sharon Thompson, associate vice president for academic affairs and dean of liberal studies, who is white.
NEWS
December 16, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, STAFF WRITER
A former top administrator and principal at String Theory Schools has filed a federal suit alleging the charter operator discriminated against her and wrongfully terminated her because of her age. Gail H. Avicolli contends that shortly after the School Reform Commission renewed the five-year operating agreement for the Philadelphia Performing Arts Charter School in January, 2014, founder Angela Corosanite and son Jason, the chief operating officer,...
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission has found "probable cause" to suggest that Chestnut Hill College discriminated against a black student by expelling him for alleged theft while allowing white students suspected of theft and other offenses to remain enrolled. The college expelled Allan-Michael Meads in March 2012, weeks before he was to graduate, after disciplinary proceedings. The commission, in a "finding of probable cause" dated July 20, said it found no evidence to support that Meads "intended to deceive, steal, or misappropriate funds" collected from a student performance of A Raisin in the Sun to benefit the Lupus Foundation.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of parents on Monday accused Upper Dublin schools of discriminating against black students by giving them disproportionately more out-of-school suspensions and placing them in lower-level courses. In a complaint to the U.S. Department of Education and the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, a group called Concerned African American Parents (CAAP) alleges that black students comprised 7.3 percent of Upper Dublin's 4,232 students last year but received 45 percent of the suspensions.
NEWS
October 4, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
IN A BIZARRE case involving allegations of firing over farting in the workplace, there was allegedly farting, lots of it and it was stinking up the place. Now, the courts will have to decide whether a Levittown woman who claims she was harassed at work because her husband couldn't stop passing gas should be compensated. Louann Clem, a former administrative assistant with Case Pork Roll Co. Inc. in Trenton, filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Camden on Sept. 11 claiming that she was badgered at work because of her husband Richard Clem's flatulence problem.
NEWS
September 8, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
NOW THAT TWO African-American organizations have reached completely different conclusions about the Cordish Companies - which has been awarded the state license to build a casino in South Philadelphia - City Council is being asked to get to the bottom of allegations that the company discriminates against black patrons. This morning, the Philadelphia chapter of the National Action Network has scheduled a City Hall news conference to release a report that slams not only Baltimore-based Cordish, but also the Black Clergy of Philadelphia and Vicinity Inc. In July, the Black Clergy issued a report that concluded the company "has a strong record in promoting diversity" and that "no credible evidence" existed that the company "practices racism or has a culture and or history of discrimination.
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