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Discrimination

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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office has concluded that there is no basis for a racial discrimination claim in Morrisville that the office had been investigating since April. Isabell Carter, who is black, accused Morrisville Borough of discrimination when it sought to evict her and her three daughters from a rented house, citing borough codes requiring more space for four people. On Monday, Carter said she was no longer worrying about whether discrimination was key to the problems with her house, which she and her daughters moved into on March 9. "I'm just content that I'm here, that we have a house," Carter said during a telephone interview.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Inspector Joseph O'Connor said he was flabbergasted when he saw a former friend and officer on national television, claiming that O'Connor was an anti-semitic bigot who threatened his life and career. The ex-buddy, Mark Goldberg, a retired police officer, sued O'Connor, the city and three other supervisors, alleging ethnic intimidation and religious discrimination. He sought more than $500,000 in lost pay and damages. Yesterday, a federal court judge threw out Goldberg's claim and vindicated O'Connor and his fellow officers.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
I have no doubts about whether Sonia Sotomayor will be confirmed for the Supreme Court by the Senate. I do have doubts about her judgment, particularly on the Ricci v. DeStefano firefighter case. In short, New Haven, Conn., offered a test for promotions to lieutenant and captain. Some firefighters passed the written test, and some didn't - whites, blacks, and Hispanics in both groups. Per city charter and union rules, promotions were to go to those with the highest test scores, combined with results of oral interviews.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Haverford College astronomy professor Bruce Partridge thinks about cultural diversity in the natural sciences, he recalls the contributions of the ancient Mayan Indians to the study of the stars. Those early astronomers built elaborate observatories out of stone, developed a table to count the days of the year, and plotted solar eclipses. Partridge believes that such cultural information should be built into any liberal arts education. He is hoping that under a new curricular policy adopted by the college's faculty last month, the Quaker institution will do just that.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Borough officials say they are just enforcing the town zoning rules. But residents of a group home on Vassar Avenue say the 18 zoning violations filed against them last summer are a form of discrimination. The eight women are all recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. They say they feel the borough wants them to move because of their past addictions and that Audubon is using an underhanded way to get them out of town by contending that their home does not comply with residential zoning standards.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was another day of discord in the seventh-floor courtroom, and the lawyers were once again huddled with the judge and arguing about testimony in the sex-discrimination case brought by the city's first female homicide detective. Attorney Richard A. Sprague, who represents the detective and four male colleagues, wanted U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d to hold the city's attorney, Richard G. Freeman, in contempt of court. And the judge came close to doing so. "You have debased this tribunal by your injection of often misleading views to this jury.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Call it proof that progress is sometimes perverse. Meaning Eddie Jordan, district attorney for Orleans Parish in Louisiana. First black D.A. in New Orleans' history. That's the progress. Here's the perverse: Soon after he took office in January 2003, Jordan fired 53 white employees en masse and replaced them all with blacks. Last week, a federal court ruled that he committed racial discrimination against 43 of those workers. A jury of eight whites and two blacks ordered the D.A. to pay $1.9 million in back pay and damages.
SPORTS
January 7, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal appeals court yesterday rejected a sex-discrimination claim by former Southern Cal women's basketball coach Marianne Stanley, saying the coach of the men's team had a more demanding job and could be paid more. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refused to reinstate Stanley to the job she had held for four years. Her replacement is former USC all-American Cheryl Miller and the Trojans are ranked 10th in the nation. Stanley, a native of Upper Darby, a graduate of Immaculata and a former coach at Penn and Old Dominion - which won three national titles with her - made $70,000 in salary and housing allowances last season and sought a contract equal to that of men's coach George Raveling, whose won-lost record at Southern Cal was below hers.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
This could be phrased more delicately, but the fact of the matter is that Lauren R. Januz has a real big butt. But that's his business. Or it should be his business, since it is his oversized butt. However, he has chosen to make the size of his hind end a public issue. Januz recently sent a stern letter to the chief executive officer of McDonald's Corp. He sent copies to me and the Minority Rights Division of the U.S. attorney's office. He wrote: "I represent a minority group that is just as visible as blacks, Mexicans, Latins, Asians or women.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doylestown Borough has become the 17th government in Pennsylvania to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. By a unanimous, 9-0 vote, the Borough Council passed a law Monday night protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. The vote drew a standing ovation from several dozen who packed Borough Hall. "This ordinance is a statement that we will no longer treat different groups of people differently," Councilman Don Berk said.
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NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney has quietly removed a charter-school executive from the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations after a report that his company paid a six-figure settlement to a female coworker who had accused him of sexual harassment and retaliation. Kenney spokeswoman Lauren Hitt said the mayor notified Alfredo Calderon, president and CEO of ASPIRA of Pennsylvania, that he was being replaced Thursday, a day after Fox29 reported on the $350,000 settlement that the charter operator's insurance company paid Evelyn Nunez, ASPIRA's former chief academic officer.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Linda D. Evans has worked as a part-time academic adviser at Community College of Philadelphia for 18 years and has taught there as an adjunct professor almost twice as long. She's tried five times, most recently in April, to gain a full-time post and has been denied, she said. She pondered in a recent online opinion piece whether her former role as an "outspoken, visible adjunct faculty union leader" and her relationship to State Rep. Dwight Evans - she's his sister - may have played a role in the denials.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Bensalem Township has temples, synagogues, and churches, but in 2014 Bucks County's largest municipality declined to grant a permit for a mosque. That, said the U.S. Justice Department in a suit filed Thursday, constituted religious discrimination. The suit seeks to have the township give the Bensalem Masjid approval to build the mosque, provide training for township employees regarding religious land-use laws, and pay unspecified damages. The Bensalem Masjid has been embroiled in litigation with the township since 2014.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
A jumble of emotions tugged at Luis Lopez on Tuesday after he was handed keys to a new condominium in Mount Holly Gardens, a neighborhood at the center of a decadelong housing discrimination battle that ended shortly before the U.S. Supreme Court was to hear the case. Lopez and about 40 neighbors, mostly Hispanic and African American, had sued Mount Holly Township after local officials announced plans to demolish the whole neighborhood and redevelop it with market-rate homes the residents could not afford.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - After years of inaction, an effort to put antidiscrimination protections for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender residents into state law got its first legislative vote Wednesday. The Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Committee approved a bill that would prohibit discrimination in housing or employment based on sexual orientation and gender identity or expression. The measure, which now moves to the full Senate for a vote, includes religious exemptions for houses of worship and faith-based schools.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - On the heels of the Orlando massacre, bills seeking equal protection for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender residents are getting a renewed push in the Capitol. Three bills championed by Senate Republicans would add sexual orientation and gender identity or expression to the list of groups already protected under the state's antidiscrimination laws - and one of the measures could come up for a committee vote as soon as Wednesday. A top aide to Sen. Scott Wagner (R., York)
NEWS
June 18, 2016
ISSUE | ORLANDO Hatred of gay people is all too real As a gay man now in my early 50s, I grew up in a time when gay people stayed deep in the closet, isolated and afraid; when images on film and television reflected a life filled with hopelessness and despair; when name-calling and physical threats and violence were as much a part of my everyday life as going to school (the two were often synonymous). In the decades since, thanks largely to President Obama and the strength and perseverance of the gay community, we have made significant gains in overturning discriminatory policies and achieving civil rights.
NEWS
June 17, 2016
By Ted Martin The facts are still rolling in about the horrific mass shooting in Orlando, and, as they do, each one is more troubling than the last. I can't imagine how the families and friends of the victims must feel. Even without knowing a victim personally, I am numb and deeply saddened. I'm remembering many nights out with some friends to blow off some steam and enjoy a weekend - and imagining how terrifying it would have been to end up in a massacre of this magnitude. However, I would be lying if I failed to note that I didn't always feel safe being myself in a public place.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By William Bender, Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission, created in 1955, is an obscure government agency with a modest budget. Most taxpayers will never need its services. But for victims of discrimination who can't afford a lawyer, the commission might be their best shot at justice. "The reason it was brought into place is because people that had these problems had no place to go," said Homer Floyd, a titan of the civil rights movement who served as the commission's executive director for 41 years until he retired in 2011.
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