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Discrimination

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NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
The Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Office has concluded that there is no basis for a racial discrimination claim in Morrisville that the office had been investigating since April. Isabell Carter, who is black, accused Morrisville Borough of discrimination when it sought to evict her and her three daughters from a rented house, citing borough codes requiring more space for four people. On Monday, Carter said she was no longer worrying about whether discrimination was key to the problems with her house, which she and her daughters moved into on March 9. "I'm just content that I'm here, that we have a house," Carter said during a telephone interview.
NEWS
August 10, 1995 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Inspector Joseph O'Connor said he was flabbergasted when he saw a former friend and officer on national television, claiming that O'Connor was an anti-semitic bigot who threatened his life and career. The ex-buddy, Mark Goldberg, a retired police officer, sued O'Connor, the city and three other supervisors, alleging ethnic intimidation and religious discrimination. He sought more than $500,000 in lost pay and damages. Yesterday, a federal court judge threw out Goldberg's claim and vindicated O'Connor and his fellow officers.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Kevin Ferris
I have no doubts about whether Sonia Sotomayor will be confirmed for the Supreme Court by the Senate. I do have doubts about her judgment, particularly on the Ricci v. DeStefano firefighter case. In short, New Haven, Conn., offered a test for promotions to lieutenant and captain. Some firefighters passed the written test, and some didn't - whites, blacks, and Hispanics in both groups. Per city charter and union rules, promotions were to go to those with the highest test scores, combined with results of oral interviews.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Haverford College astronomy professor Bruce Partridge thinks about cultural diversity in the natural sciences, he recalls the contributions of the ancient Mayan Indians to the study of the stars. Those early astronomers built elaborate observatories out of stone, developed a table to count the days of the year, and plotted solar eclipses. Partridge believes that such cultural information should be built into any liberal arts education. He is hoping that under a new curricular policy adopted by the college's faculty last month, the Quaker institution will do just that.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By John D. Shabe, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Borough officials say they are just enforcing the town zoning rules. But residents of a group home on Vassar Avenue say the 18 zoning violations filed against them last summer are a form of discrimination. The eight women are all recovering alcoholics and drug addicts. They say they feel the borough wants them to move because of their past addictions and that Audubon is using an underhanded way to get them out of town by contending that their home does not comply with residential zoning standards.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was another day of discord in the seventh-floor courtroom, and the lawyers were once again huddled with the judge and arguing about testimony in the sex-discrimination case brought by the city's first female homicide detective. Attorney Richard A. Sprague, who represents the detective and four male colleagues, wanted U.S. District Judge Robert S. Gawthrop 3d to hold the city's attorney, Richard G. Freeman, in contempt of court. And the judge came close to doing so. "You have debased this tribunal by your injection of often misleading views to this jury.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
Call it proof that progress is sometimes perverse. Meaning Eddie Jordan, district attorney for Orleans Parish in Louisiana. First black D.A. in New Orleans' history. That's the progress. Here's the perverse: Soon after he took office in January 2003, Jordan fired 53 white employees en masse and replaced them all with blacks. Last week, a federal court ruled that he committed racial discrimination against 43 of those workers. A jury of eight whites and two blacks ordered the D.A. to pay $1.9 million in back pay and damages.
SPORTS
January 7, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal appeals court yesterday rejected a sex-discrimination claim by former Southern Cal women's basketball coach Marianne Stanley, saying the coach of the men's team had a more demanding job and could be paid more. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals refused to reinstate Stanley to the job she had held for four years. Her replacement is former USC all-American Cheryl Miller and the Trojans are ranked 10th in the nation. Stanley, a native of Upper Darby, a graduate of Immaculata and a former coach at Penn and Old Dominion - which won three national titles with her - made $70,000 in salary and housing allowances last season and sought a contract equal to that of men's coach George Raveling, whose won-lost record at Southern Cal was below hers.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
This could be phrased more delicately, but the fact of the matter is that Lauren R. Januz has a real big butt. But that's his business. Or it should be his business, since it is his oversized butt. However, he has chosen to make the size of his hind end a public issue. Januz recently sent a stern letter to the chief executive officer of McDonald's Corp. He sent copies to me and the Minority Rights Division of the U.S. attorney's office. He wrote: "I represent a minority group that is just as visible as blacks, Mexicans, Latins, Asians or women.
NEWS
August 17, 2010 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doylestown Borough has become the 17th government in Pennsylvania to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. By a unanimous, 9-0 vote, the Borough Council passed a law Monday night protecting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. The vote drew a standing ovation from several dozen who packed Borough Hall. "This ordinance is a statement that we will no longer treat different groups of people differently," Councilman Don Berk said.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Entertainment Studios Networks Inc., a California company that calls itself a "100 percent African American-owned media company," has sued Comcast Corp. and Time Warner Cable Inc., claiming the cable firms have engaged in racial discrimination by failing to distribute its cable channels. Also named as defendants in the suit, filed Friday in federal court in Los Angeles, were the Rev. Al Sharpton, the National Urban League, and the NAACP. The suit, which seeks $20 billion in damages, claims that Sharpton and the civil rights groups entered into "sham" diversity agreements with Comcast that worked to the detriment of Entertainment Studios.
NEWS
January 15, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
To prevent discrimination in Coatesville schools, district officials agreed Tuesday to continue the reforms they have started, implement others to ensure fair treatment of students and staff, and continue to work with outside agencies, including the U.S. Department of Justice. "It is of utmost importance to us that we move forward in a way that honors and builds up the great strength of the racial diversity in our school district and community," said Cathy Taschner, superintendent of the Coatesville Area School District.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER employee of ABM Janitorial Services claims in a lawsuit that he was discriminated against by the company because of his faith, race and disability. Vincent Danao, 49, of Logan, became a Hebrew Israelite in 2007. He said yesterday that after he did so, "I just began getting harassed and everything. " His lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia last month, contends that Danao faced hostility, got dumped with more work, was falsely criticized for his performance and was placed under increased scrutiny after he made his new religion known.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
AN ISLAMIC advocacy organization is suing a Bucks County township for discrimination after the town's zoning board rejected an application to erect a mosque. According to the lawsuit filed yesterday by CAIR-Philadelphia in federal court, Bensalem Township is demonstrating "burdensome, discriminatory and unreasonable land use regulations" by blocking local Muslims' ability to build a mosque. The proposed Islamic worship site would be the first in the suburban town just north of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A GROUP OF Cheyney University alumni, students and other advocates yesterday called for more funding for the nation's oldest historically black college and have filed a federal lawsuit against state and federal officials. The group, called "Heeding Cheyney's Call," contends that the state school has been a victim of decades-long discrimination. Cheyney "now has an all-time-low student enrollment and an all-time-high budget deficit," lawyer and advocate Michael Coard, a Cheyney alumnus, said at a news conference in front of the federal courthouse on Market Street near 7th. "What's the cause of that?"
NEWS
August 20, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
AN ACADEMIC ADVISER at Temple University's College of Science and Technology is using a former supervisor's doctoral writings as evidence in a federal lawsuit alleging he was denied a promotion because of race. Kenneth L. Ruff, who is African-American, filed the suit yesterday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Ruff's suit said he was the only African-American among five advisers in October 2010, when the academic advising program was reorganized.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
AND NOW, just in time for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, another bright idea from the Pennsylvania Legislature. A 10-year-veteran Lancaster County lawmaker wants to amend the state Constitution to free us all from the burdens of anti-discrimination laws. You could say he has a dream. Republican Rep. Gordon Denlinger, chairman of the House Subcommittee on Fiscal Policy, an elder in the Zeltenreich Reformed Church of New Holland, Pa., is circulating a memo seeking co-sponsors for his effort.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a marked shift toward the political center, Gov. Corbett said Tuesday that he would support legislation banning discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing, and public accommodations. Corbett, who has previously staked out conservative positions on social issues, told The Inquirer that he was "coming out in support" of the bill after learning that federal law does not cover discrimination in the state. "I've had people come and talk to me about how they were discriminated against," said Corbett, who served for eight years as the state's attorney general.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
RADNOR - As a major with the Air Force Reserve, John J. Murphy thought his extensive military record would be an asset when he applied to be manager of Radnor Township. Instead, he contends, it cost him the job. Lawyers for Murphy and the township are meeting this week to discuss a possible trial date on Murphy's claims that the Radnor Township Board of Commissioners discriminated against him on the basis of his military service: They didn't hire him, Murphy alleges, because they worried that his commitment to the Reserve would require him to leave town too often.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Inspired by the case of a young man with autism who was denied a place on a heart-transplant waiting list, a Philadelphia legislator will soon begin gathering support for a state bill that would prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities who want organ transplants. Rep. John Sabatina (D., Phila.) plans to introduce "Paul's Law" in honor of Paul Corby of Pottsville, whose mother, Karen, said doctors at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania refused to put him on the heart-transplant list because of his autism.
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