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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Athyn Borough Council has instructed its Board of Health to look into a connection between white-tailed deer and a number of cases of Lyme's disease recently reported in the borough and surrounding areas. At its meeting Monday night, the Council asked the Board of Health to seek information from the Pennypack Watershed Association, a wildlife management organization, for results of a study it conducted on the problem. Lyme's disease is named after a small town in Connecticut, where the first case was reported.
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NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
AS THE hushed sounds of a choir singing Chinese folk songs drifted in from an adjacent space, Yao Huang sat on a hard chair, lifting and stamping his feet at a senior center in Chinatown. Julia Wood, an occupational therapist, sat facing her audience of about 12 elderly Asian Americans with Parkinson's disease. "We're going to be using seated exercises taken from Tai Chi and yoga," Wood said. An interpreter, David Lee, translated her English words into Cantonese. When prompted, Huang, 75, chanted "om" along with others in the Parkinson's support group that meets at the On Lok Senior Services Center, on 10th Street near Race.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, STAFF WRITER
Bill Lyon has done it again, striking a chord with readers. Soon after the legendary retired Inquirer sports columnist disclosed he is battling Alzheimer's disease in a piece posted on Philly.com Saturday, and slated for publication in the Sunday Inquirer, a torrent of support from readers followed. Lyon's column, " My Alzheimer's fight: Never, ever quit ," has been shared on Twitter and Facebook, and emailed from friend to family. Online, commenters wrote in to celebrate the sportswriter, to cheer on his fight, and to thank him for sharing his experience.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
By Marie Conley Sometimes we take Philadelphia for granted. We lead busy lives and don't often stop and reflect on the amazing things that routinely happen here. When you grow up in lower Bucks, as I did, it is easy to fall in love with the pulse of the city, its neighborhoods, American history, and, of course, the fantastic food. But I'm talking about life-changing stuff. I'm talking about men and women working at acclaimed research centers who are pioneering technological and medical breakthroughs on a regular basis.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Kim Campbell Thornton, Universal Uclick
HOW OFTEN do you have your dog or cat vaccinated? If you're still following an annual schedule, you may want to reconsider. Vaccines save lives. They teach the immune system to recognize and fight off invading organisms that cause severe and sometimes fatal diseases, such as distemper and parvovirus. But they too often brings health risks. Vaccine reactions are rare, but they include mild itching or swelling; vaccine sarcomas - cancer at the injection site - diagnosed in as many as 20,000 cats a year; autoimmune hemolytic anemia in dogs; and anaphylactic shock leading to death.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline is partnering with a San Diego research institute to study brain function and treatments to potentially reverse or slow down neurodegeneration. The Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla and GlaxoSmithKline, which has operations in the Philadelphia area, will create a center on Sanford Burnham's campus with the goal of finding new medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Under a three-year agreement, GSK will fund a research laboratory where scientists and staff from Sanford Burnham will work with GSK neuroscientists.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Among his fellow cops, Bob Eddis was always known as the Energizer Bunny. But in 2011, the ebullient former Philadelphia officer was sagging. His diabetes doctors at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital sent him to see a liver specialist. After some additional tests, the former Fraternal Order of Police president got a shock: He had nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that had progressed to cirrhosis of the liver. The news hit Eddis, now 62, hard. "I was distraught," he said.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Specialists have long suspected that symptoms progressed more slowly in Parkinson's disease patients whose main problem was tremors, rather than walking or balance. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a connection among a genetic variation, tremors, and slower progression of the disease. The information does not yet explain why some patients have a better course, but it may lead to more precise, individually targeted treatments and more accurate information for patients.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
At Interboro High School in 1966, John C. Hess was a starter on an All-Delaware County football team and in 1970 a starting tailback on the Princeton University team. "He was an incredible athlete," said Keith Lambie, owner of a surgical distribution firm who met Mr. Hess in Cape May in 1981. He often served as a crew member on Lambie's 30-foot sailboat, he said, once making it from Chesapeake Bay to Martha's Vineyard. After Mr. Hess - at 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds - was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in 2006, "he lived to come to Cape May," where Lambie and his family resided.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Services will be held Thursday, June 23, for Richard H. Gwinn, 77, of Radnor and Vero Beach, Fla., a business owner and executive, who died Saturday, Feb. 27, of Alzheimer's disease at a hospice in Vero Beach. Born in Atlanta to David Marshall Gwinn and Elizabeth Bechtold Gwinn, he moved with his family to Gladwyne as an infant and grew up there. He graduated from St. George's School in Middletown, R.I., and Yale University. While at Yale, he was a member of the Fence Club. Mr. Gwinn joined the Navy's ROTC program in 1956 during his freshman year.
NEWS
March 10, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
In the battle to cure Alzheimer's disease, the two hallmark proteins that clog the brains of people with the deadly dementia - amyloid and tau - have received most of the attention. But dementia experts have long known that some people whose brains were riddled with these misfolded proteins still had good cognitive function throughout their lives. What if something was protecting them? Bruce Yankner, a Harvard University professor of genetics and neurology, came to the University of Pennsylvania recently to talk about a gene regulator called REST that he believes may help explain why human brains are able to work as long as they do, and why some of us stay sharp into our 90s while others begin having thinking and memory problems much earlier.
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