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Disease

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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Athyn Borough Council has instructed its Board of Health to look into a connection between white-tailed deer and a number of cases of Lyme's disease recently reported in the borough and surrounding areas. At its meeting Monday night, the Council asked the Board of Health to seek information from the Pennypack Watershed Association, a wildlife management organization, for results of a study it conducted on the problem. Lyme's disease is named after a small town in Connecticut, where the first case was reported.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just in time for peak tick season, the Pennsylvania Department of Health this week announced that Lyme disease cases went up by a whopping 25 percent in a single year. Given the state often has more cases of the tick-borne infection than any other, this might worry anyone who spends time in the woods. But experts say a lot goes into reports such as this one, some of it concerning, some perplexing - and some reassuring. "We know Lyme is out there," said Atmaram Nambiar, director of the Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the Department of Health.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greg Crawford's right wrist is covered with a half-dozen multicolored plastic bracelets. "Race for Adam," reads one, for a teen in Bethlehem, Pa. "Dillon's Army," reads another, in honor of a Maryland boy. "Fight for Jessica," reads a third, for a girl in Los Angeles. "I told them I'd never take them off until we have a cure," Crawford, 50, said. The children's families gave Crawford the bracelets in 2011, the second year he biked across the country to raise money for Niemann-Pick Type C Disease, a nervous system disorder that typically strikes children.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Netflix has distinguished itself in three years as a purveyor of serious, quality programming for grownups with shows such as House of Cards , Orange is the New Black and Bloodline . This year Netflix has been expanding its reach by going after younger viewers first with the comic book adventure Marvel's Daredevil which premiered last month and now with its YA offering, Between , a sci-fi thriller for the 21-and-under set that...
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first clue that something was wrong with his grandmother came when Bill Mikus walked with her to a restaurant in Reading that she often visited. "You want your regular?" the waitress asked. It turned out the regular was just coffee. "She doesn't come here to eat?" Mikus asked the waitress, flabbergasted. He took some time off work to investigate. His grandmother, who had helped raise him after his mother died, was then in her mid-80s and lived alone. Her refrigerator was nearly empty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
She garnered worldwide acclaim - and an Oscar nomination - in 1997 for her role as a porn star in Boogie Nights . But Julianne Moore's breakout role came three years earlier, as Yelena in Louis Malle and Andre Gregory's Chekhov riff, Vanya on 42nd Street . On screen in virtually every scene, Moore radiated an aura both intelligent and sensual. A year later, she confirmed her ascendancy as a great actor in Todd Haynes' dystopian New Age satire Safe . The Boston University alumnus, who has made more than 60 films, finally won her first Oscar last year for Still Alice ,   a powerful drama about language, memory, and identity that was released Tuesday by Sony.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Julia Wagner, conquering Lyme disease is personal. Eleven years ago, she came down with the tick-borne illness. Though most people recover quickly after a course of antibiotics, Wagner was among those who wound up with complex infections. Over the course of a year, she suffered dramatic neurological changes, temporarily losing her memory and her ability to express herself. Aggressive treatment eventually reversed her symptoms, she says, and inspired her to help others as president of the PA Lyme Resource Network.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
LAST Wednesday was Scott DiClaudio's lucky day. He won the political equivalent of the Mega Millions lottery. As one of 57 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination to Common Pleas Court, DiClaudio picked the lowest number in the lottery held by state election officials to determine ballot position. He will appear in the No. 1 spot for that job in the May 19 primary, making him a virtual shoo-in to win one of the 12 seats in the court being filled this year. He might as well go get measured for a black robe.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
When I was in medical school at the end of the 20th century, I was taught that Alzheimer's disease was a rare cause of dementia in middle-aged adults. The elderly had senility caused by an indecipherable mess of pathologies and aging. Now, in the 21st century, Alzheimer's is called an epidemic. It has even helped five-time nominee Julianne Moore win her first Academy Award. In Still Alice, based on the novel of the same title, Moore portrays professor Alice Howland, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and who suffers the relentless decay of her capacities.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Midafternoon on a recent Friday, the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics e-mailed its membership that it would hold a webinar on measles. By the time registration closed at 6 p.m. that Sunday, 219 doctors had signed up for the next morning's presentation - more watched in groups - and another session had to be scheduled for later in the week. Fifteen years after measles was officially eliminated from the United States, most young doctors have never seen an actual case.
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