CollectionsDisease
IN THE NEWS

Disease

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Athyn Borough Council has instructed its Board of Health to look into a connection between white-tailed deer and a number of cases of Lyme's disease recently reported in the borough and surrounding areas. At its meeting Monday night, the Council asked the Board of Health to seek information from the Pennypack Watershed Association, a wildlife management organization, for results of a study it conducted on the problem. Lyme's disease is named after a small town in Connecticut, where the first case was reported.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Burke Jr., 73, of Jenkintown, former director of nephrology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, died Monday, March 10, of pneumonia at St. Joseph Villa, Flourtown. Dr. Burke's career spanned 40 years at the hospital, where he was considered one of the region's top nephrologists for kidney treatment. He was honored in 2011 as the Beatrice F. Nicoletti professor of nephrology by the Philadelphia institution. He was born in Philadelphia at Jefferson and raised in Drexel Hill.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN A 57-year-old Camden woman has tested positive for meningococcal disease and is recovering at home after being hospitalized, Camden County officials said. The victim, whom officials did not identify Wednesday, began undergoing treatment Feb. 28 at Kennedy University Hospital-Cherry Hill for an unknown illness. The patient's serology blood test showed she had meningococcemia, a disease caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis , officials said. The Camden County Health Department and New Jersey Department of Health and Human Services were notified Monday, and others in the woman's household were found to be free of the disease.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
M AX PERELMAN, 37, of East Falls, is co-founder and head of business development for Philly start-up Biomeme. Backed by DreamIt Ventures, Biomeme has a device that will turn your smartphone into a mobile DNA-replicating machine to help point-of-care clinicians quickly diagnose and track infectious diseases. Other co-founders are Jesse vanWestrienen, 30, of Old City, and Marc DeJohn, 44, of East Falls. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Biomeme? A: Marc and Jesse have backgrounds in bioscience and engineering and had been working on a mobile-diagnostics device.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Watching your weight? Hoping for better heart health? Trying to prevent type 2 diabetes? Nuts to all that! It turns out that nuts appear to bestow a wide variety of health benefits, from helping clear out bad cholesterol to cutting down on visceral fat to reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or cancer. The benefits of consuming nuts were emphasized late last year in a large study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Findings revealed that participants in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who ate a fistful of nuts daily were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than those who did not consume nuts.
NEWS
February 19, 2014
I AM a 28-year-old recovering heroin addict. Having said that, Ms. Flowers, I now need to address your perceptions of addiction and specifically Philip Seymour Hoffman's death. Being educated in this field, both academically and personally, I am blessed with a unique insight into the disease of addiction. And, make no mistake about it, it is a disease. However, it is not a disease like cancer or diabetes, as some like to compare it to. It is a disease not like any other. It is threefold in nature: a mental obsession, like obsessive-compulsive disorder; a physical allergy, like one would have to peanut butter; and a spiritual malady, which I have no words to explain.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theirs is not the kind of medical history anyone wants. The grandchildren of George Melling hope others can learn from the trail of death and damaged hearts that runs through their family tree. Four cousins - the children of two of George's daughters - died decades ago when their hearts stopped suddenly. Two were teenagers; another was 22 years old. When one of the mothers developed heart problems, a Johns Hopkins University doctor began looking for inherited heart defects in other family members and readily found them.
NEWS
February 4, 2014
R AJIV MAHALE, 31, and Jonathan McEuen, 32, both of Center City, and Jake Boy, 26, of Roxborough, are co-founders of startup SpeSo Health at 17th and Walnut streets in Center City. SpeSo has an online platform for identifying and accessing top medical experts in 6,000 rare diseases so that health-care systems can create communities and share information. I spoke with Mahale, who earned a master's degree from Wharton. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: A family member was diagnosed with a rare blood cancer.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dermatologist Gil Yosipovitch believes itch should be studied and treated as a disease in itself, not just a symptom of disease. That's why he founded the International Society for the Study of Itch in 2005. And that's partly why he left North Carolina's Wake Forest University six months ago to create the Itch Center at Temple University School of Medicine. "We're behind our colleagues in the field of pain," said Yosipovitch, who is also the new chair of Temple's dermatology department.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bottlenose dolphins are migrating south. So officials in New Jersey thought that they had seen the last of the strandings - animals washing onto beaches, dead or dying - in what has become the largest Atlantic Coast die-off of dolphins in memory. But on Monday, the body of another dolphin, this one badly decomposed, washed ashore on a Delaware Bay beach, taking the state's total of stranded dolphins to 135 since July 1. Overall, more than 800 dolphins have stranded along the coast, although officials fear far more have died offshore and never been discovered.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Stanley Plotkin, 81, creator of the rubella vaccine, hopes another vaccine can be made to vanquish Lyme disease. Plotkin's call for a new Lyme disease vaccine is also personal. In an op-ed piece for the New York Times this summer, Plotkin, a Doylestown resident and professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, described how in 2005, his son, Alec, was felled with a heart ailment caused by Lyme. Although Alec has since recovered, Plotkin urged patients and physicians to contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and encourage the agency to make a Lyme vaccine a top priority.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|