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NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
When I was in medical school at the end of the 20th century, I was taught that Alzheimer's disease was a rare cause of dementia in middle-aged adults. The elderly had senility caused by an indecipherable mess of pathologies and aging. Now, in the 21st century, Alzheimer's is called an epidemic. It has even helped five-time nominee Julianne Moore win her first Academy Award. In Still Alice, based on the novel of the same title, Moore portrays professor Alice Howland, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and who suffers the relentless decay of her capacities.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
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NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
When I was in medical school at the end of the 20th century, I was taught that Alzheimer's disease was a rare cause of dementia in middle-aged adults. The elderly had senility caused by an indecipherable mess of pathologies and aging. Now, in the 21st century, Alzheimer's is called an epidemic. It has even helped five-time nominee Julianne Moore win her first Academy Award. In Still Alice, based on the novel of the same title, Moore portrays professor Alice Howland, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and who suffers the relentless decay of her capacities.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com 215-854-4890
YOUTH VIOLENCE is a disease and it spreads like a virus, Mayor Nutter told about 75 people at a Temple University conference yesterday. Attendees included activists, educators and members of the mayor's Youth Violence Prevention Collaborative. "Violence is a public-health crisis," Nutter said. "It is a disease. We know how to treat disease. " Nutter cited a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to the city and Temple to set up Ceasefire Philly, an offshoot of a Chicago-based group that uses methods and strategies similar to disease control to stop violence in communities.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Midafternoon on a recent Friday, the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics e-mailed its membership that it would hold a webinar on measles. By the time registration closed at 6 p.m. that Sunday, 219 doctors had signed up for the next morning's presentation - more watched in groups - and another session had to be scheduled for later in the week. Fifteen years after measles was officially eliminated from the United States, most young doctors have never seen an actual case.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JIM KOLLER was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, he wanted to find out all he could about the disease. He wanted to know, how could he, a fitness buff who thought nothing of a 24-mile bike ride from his home in Lafayette Hill to the Philadelphia Art Museum and back, contract the crippling, fatal disease named after the baseball player Lou Gehrig? How could he, a man who lifted weights and swam six days a week for 20 years, be afflicted with a disease that slowly destroys a person's ability to even flex a muscle?
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Jackson, 81, and his partner of more than 40 years, Myrna Roach, 74, are the kind of older people many of us would like to be one day. Both still work and are energetic enough to travel extensively. They take medicine for high blood pressure and he has diabetes, but they feel healthy. They like to join clinical trials and know from one that their mental abilities have been stable for years. Still, Roach has a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease. Jackson doesn't, but Alzheimer's is the disease he dreads above all others.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joanna Pacini reached into the coffin and touched her son's face. For the first time in years, she saw the man she once knew. Gone was the angry Joseph Pacini who had threatened police on YouTube, the brooding, irrational son who called her Satan. He was again the handsome, successful middle child she called "Joey, my Joey. " His peaceful expression contrasted with their last encounter, on Dec. 30. She was preparing chicken cutlets in their Clifton Heights, Delaware County, kitchen while he raged about the pope.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
It will take six to eight weeks for tests to confirm whether the Delaware County man killed Tuesday in a police shooting had Huntington's disease, sources said. An autopsy released Friday on Joseph A. Pacini, 52, showed he died of multiple gunshot wounds, the medical examiner's report said. Pacini was in his car when he allegedly tried to run down officers who were attempting a traffic stop in Upper Darby. In response, police opened fire. According to Michael J. Chitwood, Upper Darby superintendent of police, Pacini was wounded five times in his head, neck, shoulders, and chest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2014
HAPPY DAYS are here again, right? Stocks are up, the recession is over and employment continues to grow (though wages remain stagnant). Perhaps it's a renewed optimism over employment growth - or is it apathy over stagnant wages? - that kept two-thirds of U.S. voters from even bothering to vote last week. You may be asking what the Pennsylvania governor's race had to do with your fitness and health. Quite a bit, if you ask me. Gubernatorial elections have a real impact on our day-to-day lives.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joshua Cutler had a thriving career as a network engineer for the federal government in 2006 when he suddenly fell ill. Cutler, of Winchester, Va., once had an active life as a young father who raced cars on weekends and enjoyed time with his family, but he suddenly found himself overcome with fatigue and feeling perpetually sick. He slept 18 or more hours a day. The consequences were catastrophic. He lost his house and car. His family struggled to keep its head above water. After a series of false starts, Cutler found a doctor who he said correctly diagnosed his condition as chronic Lyme disease and began a treatment plan that has made his condition marginally better.
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