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NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Move over, ice bucket challenge. Borrowing the basics of the numbingly shared social-media fad, physicians and staff at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital on Tuesday volunteered to be showered with tennis balls to benefit pancreatic cancer research. The "Bucket of Tennis Balls Challenge" honored Joe Strub of West Chester, an avid tennis player and information-systems technician who lost his battle with the disease four years ago at age 62. While the oft-publicized ice bucket challenge calls awareness to Lou Gehrig's disease and has raised more than $110 million to aid research in just a couple of months, Tuesday's event hopes to call similar attention to a disease that claims the lives of 33,000 Americans per year, according to Dr. Jonathan Brody.
NEWS
September 9, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her son did not want her to do it. The ice-bucket challenge might be too much for someone with ALS. But Mariah Fenton Gladis was tired of seeing everybody else have all the fun - and the satisfaction of raising money to combat a devastating disease for which there is no cure. So, late last month, the award-winning Malvern psychotherapist sat in the backyard of her Chester County home as her husband, Ron, flipped a bucket of ice water over her head. "No problem," Gladis says slowly in an online video.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Move over, ice bucket challenge. Borrowing the basics of the numbingly shared social-media fad, physicians and staff at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital on Tuesday volunteered to be showered with tennis balls to benefit pancreatic cancer research. The "Bucket of Tennis Balls Challenge" honored Joe Strub of West Chester, an avid tennis player and information-systems technician who lost his battle with the disease four years ago at age 62. While the oft-publicized ice bucket challenge calls awareness to Lou Gehrig's disease and has raised more than $110 million to aid research in just a couple of months, Tuesday's event hopes to call similar attention to a disease that claims the lives of 33,000 Americans per year, according to Dr. Jonathan Brody.
NEWS
September 9, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her son did not want her to do it. The ice-bucket challenge might be too much for someone with ALS. But Mariah Fenton Gladis was tired of seeing everybody else have all the fun - and the satisfaction of raising money to combat a devastating disease for which there is no cure. So, late last month, the award-winning Malvern psychotherapist sat in the backyard of her Chester County home as her husband, Ron, flipped a bucket of ice water over her head. "No problem," Gladis says slowly in an online video.
NEWS
August 20, 2014
NOW THAT the fundraising gimmick for Lou Gehrig's disease involving people dumping ice water on their heads has gone viral, similar causes around the country are wondering how they can capitalize on the idea for their own benefit. Frankly, we are not big fans of the "ice bucket challenge" that comprised about 80 percent of our Facebook feed this weekend. The idea works like this: Someone challenges you, you have the option of pouring a bucket of ice water over your head or writing a $100 check to the ALS Association.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey's game of high-profile aqua-tag started this week with a video of the New Jersey Devils mascot hoisting an orange cooler of ice water onto team executive Scott O'Neil as the 1990 hit "Ice, Ice Baby" played in the background. O'Neil, who is also CEO of the 76ers, then drafted Gov. Christie for a dousing. From there, it took off: Christie nominated U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.), who challenged the mayors of Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, and Camden. The governor also called out Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who brought in company executive Sheryl Sandberg.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
As trees go, black walnuts are the superheroes of Pennsylvania's forests. Strong and resistant to most aggressive insects and sickness, their lumber is among the most valued in the state. But arborists and forestry officials are battling what they say is green kryptonite to that black walnut population: thousand cankers disease, a deadly and incurable illness that has emerged in the region for the second time in recent years, and that some say poses a grave threat to the state's $19 billion hardwoods industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014
A NEW STUDY has delivered compelling evidence that diet, exercise and other prescription-free interventions are the best way to ward off Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's is perhaps the most dreadful of modern diseases: It steals your mind, your personality and your very soul. And once you have it, there is no turning back. On a personal note, I have seen firsthand the slow, devastating effects of this awful disease on a loved one, as well as the family members. So, my ears really perked up when I heard about the groundbreaking study that was presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors write four billion prescriptions annually for pain, depression, high cholesterol, and myriad other conditions. Why not for hunger? That's what happens at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, which sits in a neighborhood of endless need, its residents suffering from higher levels of hunger than perhaps anywhere else in Pennsylvania. The North Philadelphia area is also among the hungriest in America. Pediatricians write prescriptions that offer $5 discounts for already highly reduced $10-to-$15 boxes of produce sold weekly in a hospital lobby.
NEWS
June 28, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania had the most Lyme disease cases in the nation in 2009, 2011, and 2012, yet no state-run surveillance program for ticks exists. A bill Gov. Corbett signed into law Thursday seeks to remedy that. The Lyme and Related Tick-Borne Disease Surveillance, Education, Prevention, and Treatment Act will establish a 20-member task force to develop educational and surveillance programs to be run by the Department of Health and other agencies. "This is an underdiagnosed and undertreated disease," said Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R., Montgomery)
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
'Hi, folks! Do you know what a freshwater amoeba is?" That's how Jeremy Lewis greeted attendees at the Brain Health Fair who ambled up to his booth last week at the Convention Center. Then he told them about the brain-eating parasite that killed his son. During the dog days of summer 2010, Kyle, 7, was playing in a Texas lake. At some point, a single-celled swimming monster "went up his nose and basically ate his brain," Lewis said from Booth 15. It happened fast. "Thursday morning, he had a headache.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Burke Jr., 73, of Jenkintown, former director of nephrology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, died Monday, March 10, of pneumonia at St. Joseph Villa, Flourtown. Dr. Burke's career spanned 40 years at the hospital, where he was considered one of the region's top nephrologists for kidney treatment. He was honored in 2011 as the Beatrice F. Nicoletti professor of nephrology by the Philadelphia institution. He was born in Philadelphia at Jefferson and raised in Drexel Hill.
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