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NEWS
November 27, 2012 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Hunters in part of south-central Pennsylvania will be subject to extra restrictions when deer season starts Monday, as state wildlife officials work to ensure the wild whitetail population has not contracted a deadly disease. Those who kill deer within a 600-square-mile area covering parts of York and Adams Counties must take the carcasses to a checkpoint to be tested for chronic wasting disease. The neurological infection is fatal to elk, moose, and deer, though it can't be transmitted to humans.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Tammy McGinley
The Palmyra High School Panthers played the Phillies' wives at Legion Field in a benefit softball game for the ALS Association. It was the second year for the event; last year, $6,000 was raised to help fight Lou Gehrig's disease. A three-kilometer walk was held before the game Saturday.
NEWS
January 14, 1986
I was amazed to read the Dec. 30 Letter to the Editor from the president of Horizon House, a respected rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, denying that serious mental illnesses (e.g., schizophrenia, manic depressive psychosis) are brain diseases. In the last decade research evidence has become overwhelming that these are indeed brain diseases, just as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease are brain diseases. That is the real tragedy of the homeless and street-people - that approximately one-third of them have diseases that are, in the majority of cases, treatable.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Katharine Seelye and Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amyloidosis is an extremely rare blood disorder that produces an excess of proteins that build up in the body's tissues and vital organs. There are several forms of the disease. Some are so devastating that they kill patients in less than two years. In others, patients can live for years without symptoms. One of the world's leading amyloidosis experts, Merrill Benson, professor of medicine and medical genetics at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, said yesterday that Gov. Casey appeared to have a mild form.
NEWS
January 19, 2004
DOES GEORGE Bush intend to expand the American empire to the moon and Mars? How can he propose spending hundreds of billions of dollars on these escapist fantasies when so many of us in both this country and the world are suffering and in need, much because of his politics? Only someone with mad politician's disease could be in such denial of reality, such inhumane blankness to people's hurting, such misunderstanding of real progress and such insensitivity to the common values of all the world's great religions and superior philosophies!
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | By Daniel Kaufman, Special to The Inquirer
Five men who lived near contaminated land on the old Valley Forge Army Hospital property off Charlestown Road have developed Hodgkin's disease within the last 15 years, the Schuylkill Township Board of Supervisors was told last week. Three of the men, accompanied by family members, asked the supervisors Wednesday night to prod federal, state and/or county authorities to investigate a possible connection between their lymphatic cancer and toxic metals found on the land. The Phoenixville Area School District, which leases a 35-acre piece of the property on Township Line Road near Coldstream Road from the federal government, announced it had discovered abnormally high levels of lead, zinc and silver on a depressed 6-by-20-foot section in January.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Gayle Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Everything seemed to be going perfectly in Michael and Julie Barrons' four- year marriage. Then, last December, doctors told them that their youngest son, Brian, then 4 months, had a rare congenital disease and probably would not live to see his first birthday. "I don't even remember what the doctor said after he told us," said Julie Barron, 25. "I saw his mouth moving, but I heard nothing . . . I guess I was in shock. It felt as if someone had just punched me in the stomach. " Brian had begun to experience seizures that made his little body shake, his eyes roll toward the back of his head, and his breathing turn shallow and sporadic.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Judy Baehr, Special to The Inquirer
Seven years ago, Leona Stevenson tumbled off her bike on the Ocean City boardwalk and landed in hell. "Ordinarily she'd have hopped up and got back on," recalled her husband, Joe. "But she didn't. She had trouble getting up. " Lee, 58, had also complained before the fall about cramping in her legs and feet, and had begun to drag one foot. So after she fell on the patio of their Haddonfield home and again couldn't get up, the Stevensons consulted their physician. He sent them to a neurologist.
NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Athyn Borough Council has instructed its Board of Health to look into a connection between white-tailed deer and a number of cases of Lyme's disease recently reported in the borough and surrounding areas. At its meeting Monday night, the Council asked the Board of Health to seek information from the Pennypack Watershed Association, a wildlife management organization, for results of a study it conducted on the problem. Lyme's disease is named after a small town in Connecticut, where the first case was reported.
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NEWS
February 3, 2016
ISSUE | BLIZZARD OF 2016 Turnpike should have been closed Behind the chaos of 500 motorists stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike for 24 hours in last month's blizzard is a fundamental question: Why did otherwise intelligent people put their lives at risk ("On turnpike, a blizzard of questions," Sunday)? Why did universities and businesses send their students and employees into the dangerous storm? And why did the Turnpike Commission not close the highway? Washington closed its Metro system from Friday evening through Sunday night.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
As a longtime nurse, Mary Lou Manning has seen some horrific infectious diseases, from AIDS to anthrax to Ebola. But Manning, who has published more than 35 articles on infectious diseases, focuses more on how to prevent the spread of infection in the first place. Manning's work as an ambassador for global infection prevention has taken her to numerous countries. In 2007, she joined a post-tsunami recovery team in Indonesia. During the recent Ebola crisis, Manning was on the faculty of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention safety training program for health-care workers going to West Africa.
SPORTS
December 24, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
It is July, and Leanne Purcell is playing summer league basketball with her Notre Dame teammates, working out every day to prepare for her final year of high school. Later that same month, she's the maid of honor at her sister Jaclyn's wedding. Next, it is Aug. 30, and Purcell is in Ocean City, N.J., with her father, Michael. She's reading Their Eyes Were Watching God on the beach. But something isn't right; her stomach is bothering her. The pain isn't normal, and it isn't cramping, either.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Tamela Oglesby was gasping for air. "It felt like my last breath," the 35-year-old nursing assistant said, reaching for her throat as she recounted that night one year ago. "I thought I was going to die. My heart was just beating, really, really fast. " Figuring it would be the fastest way there, she took a bus to Pennsylvania Hospital's emergency room, a few blocks from her Northern Liberties apartment. A chest X-ray revealed the diagnosis that changed her life in ways Oglesby could not have expected.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IS IT POSSIBLE to die of a broken heart? When Tony Lyle's longtime partner, Jim Clark, died in February, Tony's doctor suggested he take an antidepressant. "I'm not depressed," Tony insisted. But on Oct. 27, Tony died of a heart attack in his apartment on Rittenhouse Square. He was 79. "He was very upset by Jim's death," said Tony's niece, Alison Lyle Flowers. "Could it have been a broken heart? Who knows?" Anthony A. Lyle, who with his partner, James N. Clark, were active in caring for victims of the HIV/AIDS virus from the early days of the disease, was a longtime editor of the Pennsylvania Gazette, the University of Pennsylvania's prizewinning alumni magazine.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
"VIRGINIA ROSS started as a hugger," the Daily News' Ron Goldwyn wrote about her in 2001. Virginia visited hospitals "to hug and rock babies left behind by AIDS- and HIV-infected mothers," Goldwyn wrote. That kind of love and compassion for the sick and those "left behind" by sufferers marked Virginia's life of service to AIDS and HIV patients, as well as in education programs to call attention to the disease and ways to prevent its spread. Her particular emphasis was on the impact the dreaded disease has on the African-American community, where for many years it was a forbidden topic because of its association with homosexuality.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania task force called Wednesday for an increase in surveillance, education, and common-sense preventive measures to combat the increasing prevalence of Lyme disease. The panel did not issue any recommendations on treatment. But its 64-page report alluded to sharp disagreement on that topic among some of the members. No surprise, given that the task force was mandated by law to include both mainstream medical practitioners as well as representatives of a group that advocates months of high-dose antibiotics to treat patients with lingering symptoms.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Lewis Schotland, 84, of Wynnewood, an internationally known researcher into muscle disorders and for 38 years a leading figure in the University of Pennsylvania's neurology department, died Thursday, Aug. 13, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Schotland's career as an MD spanned almost 50 years. He arrived at Penn in 1967, rising through the ranks to become professor of neurology and, later, professor emeritus. He closed his lab in 1998 and retired from clinical practice in 2005.
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