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Disease

NEWS
September 24, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
A boat race on the Delaware yesterday raised money for kidney disease research. Winning were: non-spinnaker class, Jerry Hoefle and the Osprey; spinnaker class, Don Hoefle and the Hot Canary; one-design class, Dillon Breton aboard his unnamed vessel.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Bryn Athyn Borough Council has instructed its Board of Health to look into a connection between white-tailed deer and a number of cases of Lyme's disease recently reported in the borough and surrounding areas. At its meeting Monday night, the Council asked the Board of Health to seek information from the Pennypack Watershed Association, a wildlife management organization, for results of a study it conducted on the problem. Lyme's disease is named after a small town in Connecticut, where the first case was reported.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | By DALE O'REILLEY
The first call came while my home health aide and I were eating breakfast. "Have you seen page two of The Inquirer?" my husband asked. "There's been a breakthrough. " The next call - my mother in North Carolina. Her bridge partner had awakened her at 6:30 a.m. with the news and Mom had sent Dad out for a Raleigh paper to get the details. Scientists at Johns Hopkins have identified the missing element in the brain of individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
NEWS
February 13, 1986 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
At first glance, it looked like Bowling for Dollars, people flitting about the Thunderbird Bowling Lanes in Willow Grove Sunday, urging their friends to bowl for high scores. But profit was not the motive. The bowlers were raising money for a good cause: helping to find a cure for a child-killing disease. The three-hour bowl-a-thon raised money for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. CF, a genetic disease that affects the lungs and digestion, is the number one killer of children and young adults in the United States.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | By Judy Baehr and Charlie Frush, Special to The Inquirer
In her lifetime, Ruth Hodson has endured 12 periods of total paralysis, six bouts with blindness and untold physical and emotional stress. Such is the nature of multiple sclerosis, the disease she's battled for some 40 years. "I got it when I was 17, and it's a constant fight for me to stay as well as I can so I can keep ahead of it," she said. She's now 60, and despite her own handicap, she has helped to develop a national health-care organization devoted to meeting the needs of others.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Two medical teams yesterday reported independently locating the gene that causes the disfiguring Elephant Man's disease, and doctors said they soon should have a way of detecting the disorder before birth. The findings, by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, "could lead to a medical treatment or possibly a cure for this disease," said Dr. Allan Rubenstein, medical director of the National Neurofibromatosis Foundation.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tests completed yesterday concluded that the bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease had been found in a showerhead at the county prison and likely caused an inmate to fall ill with the disease last month, health officials said. The bacteria were not found anywhere else in the prison, said Dr. Lewis Polk, director of the Bucks County Health Department. And county officials said they saw no further cause for alarm. County officials said the inmate, who was hospitalized in July with pneumonia caused by the disease, has since recovered.
SPORTS
August 11, 1996 | By Stephen J. Morgan, FOR THE INQUIRER
In Montana, which has an international reputation for superb fishing, biologists learned in December 1994 that a disease caused by a parasite had killed 90 percent of the rainbow trout along a 50-mile stretch of the renowned Madison River. The discovery distressed anglers fond of Montana, and it left them wondering what the impact of the problem, known as whirling disease, would be. Now, 20 months later, biologists have a clearer picture of the daunting task they face in fighting the disease.
NEWS
September 26, 2008
Officials are investigating the circumstances surrounding this month's deaths of two patients and infections of four others, all of whom apparently contracted Legionnaires' disease at St. Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick, N.J. In all, three men and three women have been diagnosed with the disease, a type of pneumonia that can be fatal for those with weakened immune systems. Test results were pending on five others. All six patients who tested positive were being treated for other serious illnesses at the time, a state health official said Wednesday.
NEWS
January 25, 1986 | By Meredith M. Henry, Special to the Inquirer
Sixteen cases of chancroid, a rare and contagious sexually transmitted disease, have been reported in Southeastern Pennsylvania since November, according to the state Department of Health. Denise Johnson, assistant program director in the division of sexually transmitted diseases, said yesterday that the cases had been limited to Chester and Berks Counties. "It's considered an outbreak because we just don't see much chancroid around," Johnson said. She said that in 1983 a total of 847 cases were reported in the United States, with most of them in New York, Georgia, Florida and California.
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