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Disease

NEWS
August 28, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania officials said yesterday the hospital had a confirmed case of Legionnaires' disease and was trying to identify the source of infection. Citing "confidentiality issues," Rebecca Harmon, a hospital spokeswoman, declined to say whether the case involved a patient or employee or whether that person contracted the bacterial infection while already in the hospital. A Philadelphia health official said that a patient from Bucks County had the disease.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a rose-lover like Catherine Button, it doesn't get much worse than this: Over the last two years, she has lost 65 of 75 roses in her Burlington County garden to a strange-sounding disease known as rose rosette. Though most home gardeners in the Philadelphia area have never heard of it, the disease may turn out to be the deadliest threat to roses ever. Spread by a mite invisible to the naked eye, rosette affects many garden roses, including the heretofore bulletproof Knock Outs.
NEWS
August 2, 2003 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Environmental testing began yesterday at the six-story Parkade Building in downtown Camden to rule it out as a source of a confirmed case of Legionnaire's disease. County and city officials said a 34-year-old man working in the building had contracted the disease, and a 47-year-old man who works in the building had a suspected case of it. Both are employed by the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, whose main offices are across the street. "We've decided that the county will take action to do basic environmental testing to assess the situation," said Catherine Gavin, director of the county's health and human services department.
NEWS
May 8, 2001 | By Loretta Tofani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alzheimer's disease can - and should - be diagnosed three to five years earlier than is commonplace today, giving medications more time to slow progression of the fatal illness, the nation's neurologists announced yesterday. Through a series of basic questions intended to test memory and judgment, primary-care physicians should be able to determine whether a patient has Alzheimer's, according to the American Academy of Neurology's new guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis and treatment of the disease.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Tamara Audi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Like any new parents, Linda and Carl Skowronek took no chances with their firstborn child. Nineteen years ago, before they brought their blue-eyed boy home, they outfitted their Madison Avenue house with electrical-outlet guards, safety gates for the stairs, child-safety locks on the cabinets, and padding on sharp corners. Linda, a nurse, made sure her son had all his immunizations on schedule. "We thought we had done everything right," said Carl Skowronek, an administrative analyst for Medicaid.
NEWS
October 14, 1993 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The play begins with Brandyn Barbara Artis alone on the stage, facing the audience in a white dress. The color of the dress holds many symbols for the California actress: white for hope, for new beginnings, for health. But the color has a darker meaning, too. The white dress represents the hospital gown that Artis, 41, wore six years ago when she had her cancerous right breast removed. Her play, Sister, Girl, to be performed at 7 tonight at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel, is about her terrifying, sad, sometimes humorous and ultimately victorious journey through breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and recovery.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | By Alison F. Orenstein, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sight of children reminds Debora Gall of her son and the things he can no longer do: eat, walk, go to the bathroom by himself. All her son, Anthony, can do is open and close his eyes, move his arms a little and occasionally make a loose fist. And he can react to pain by moving his lips or crying, although no sound comes out. Anthony, 7, is dying of adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), the disease depicted in the film Lorenzo's Oil. He is a patient at the Voorhees (N.J.) Pediatric Facility, which is home to nearly 100 chronically or terminally ill children.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometimes, Carmel Snyder slips a family videotape into the VCR, sits back and finds refuge in the memories of the life she used to have with her husband, Bill. Bill Snyder, the husband who used to fix everything, the father who was "wonderful," today shuffles around his home with a "security" pillow tucked under his arm. At 63, he does not recognize his five children or his eight grandchildren, and his wife is his mother. He rarely says a word. He is already incontinent, and Carmel Snyder is preparing for the day he forgets how to eat. About eight years ago, Snyder was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
October 18, 1994 | By Gene Morris, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Upper Darby senior Nicole Muff is a standout volleyball and softball player, a straight-A student, and a member of the National Honor Society. And she suffers from a disease that's incurable. Incurable, but not life-threatening. Painful, annoying, unpredictable and, perhaps most of all, extremely frustrating. It's called Crohn's disease, and it causes inflammation of the colon. It typically strikes teenagers or young adults. It saps them of energy. It causes weight loss and, sometimes, depression.
SPORTS
June 22, 2003 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The images were powerful and touching. Here was Bruce Edwards, a caddie suffering from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, walking arm-in-arm off the 18th green to a standing ovation with his boss, Hall of Fame player Tom Watson, after the final round of the U.S. Open, uncertain of how many more times they would be together on the golf course. In Tarrytown, N.Y., where she got a few glimpses of Edwards on television last Sunday while attending a national convention related to ALS, Ellyn Phillips and other delegates were delighted by what they had seen.
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