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Disease

NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandy Selfridge was one in a thousand. In April 2009, she was diagnosed with scleroderma, a rare autoimmune disease involving the skin. By September, at age 58, she was gone. Her death led Christy McCaffrey, her daughter, to produce a documentary about the disease. The 45-minute film, Project Scleroderma: Beneath the Surface, which took two years and $40,000 to make, is narrated by comedian Bob Saget, who lost his sister to the disease. It's slated for a Thursday premiere at the Ritz East Theatre, 125 S. Second St., at 8 p.m. "At first, it was difficult for me to be sharing something that is obviously so personal," said McCaffrey of Havertown, a hairstylist who partnered with Bill Connell and J.C. Costa of New Pace Productions in Ardmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013
Ways to Live Forever - A 12-year-old boy with leukemia tries to learn everything he can about his disease and what he faces, and list all the things he'd like to do someday. Starring Ben Chaplin, Emilia Fox, and Greta Scacchi. PG-13 (AMC Cherry Hill 24)
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
TONY ALCANTARA had hopes, plans and dreams, like any normal young man of superior intellect. Unfortunately, Tony wasn't normal. He had superior intelligence, but he grew up with osteopetrosis, a rare disorder that causes the bones to harden. Over the years, he broke many bones and ultimately could get around only with crutches or in a wheelchair. But Tony Alcantara had hopes, plans and dreams that he refused to relinquish despite his gradually worsening condition. He continued to inspire everyone who knew him with his optimism and courage.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
At birth in September, Moriah Mudd seemed strong and healthy. Her physical exam by a pediatrician at Riddle Hospital was completely normal. But then a nurse put a sensor on her foot and, within minutes, a machine called a pulse oximeter revealed that her blood oxygen level was alarmingly low - a sign that something could be critically wrong with her heart. Three weeks later, Moriah underwent surgery at A.I duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington to correct a severe congenital heart defect diagnosed by follow-up tests.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I BUMPED into another guy at a party who I happen to know is a notorious womanizer and a disease carrier. Should I warn women that I see him with that he has herpes? He infected a friend of mine and every time I see him up in another female's face, I wonder if she's his next victim. Mia: I want to say "kick his a--" the next time you see him out, but that might get you arrested. So, I called the much cooler-headed Gary Bell, executive director of Blacks Educating Blacks About Sexual Health Issues, for his advice on what to do. Here's his advice: "He's making assumptions, first of all. He's assuming that he's behaving irresponsibly because he has in the past.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Gustavo D. Aguirre peered into the eyes of his small fluffy patient, a dog called a Coton de Tulear, he was surprised to see a small blob beneath the retina, almost like an egg yolk. Within a year, the blob had degenerated so it looked like scrambled eggs. It reminded Aguirre, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, of the symptoms in a form of human blindness called Best disease. Could the dog have a canine version of the same thing?
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Scientists have finally recovered stem cells from cloned human embryos, a goal that could lead to new treatments for such illnesses as Parkinson's disease and diabetes. A prominent expert called the work a landmark but noted that a different, simpler technique now under development may prove more useful. Stem cells can turn into any cell of the body, so scientists are interested in using them to create tissue for treating disease. Pancreatic tissue, for example, might be used to treat diabetes.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
IF I SAY "vegan rock star," Chrissie Hynde or Moby or Jason Mraz might come to mind. You wouldn't immediately think of T. Colin Campbell, 79, professor emeritus of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University. But Campbell's half-century of research in nutrition, hundreds of peer-reviewed papers and a key role in the world's most comprehensive study of health and nutrition, the "China Study," have surely made him a rock star in the plant-eating world. He summarized that groundbreaking study (which the New York Times called "the Grand Prix of epidemiology")
NEWS
April 18, 2013
An elderly woman who was found dead inside her burning South Philadelphia home Monday afternoon had died of heart disease before the fire occurred, the Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner, identified the woman as Dorothy Powell, 84. Firefighters encountered heavy fire on the first floor of the home on the 2100 block of Pierce Street in Point Breeze, Executive Chief Richard Davison said. He said firefighters found Powell dead inside the home.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
By Ann Connor Parkinson's is a chronic, progressive neurological disease. It is hard to live with, yet there are far worse diseases to have. Nevertheless, since April is Parkinson's Awareness Month, let's, for a few paragraphs, shine a bright light on the dark, sobering realities of this disease. Some of the questions your neurologist asks while Parkinson's is in its early stages pull the curtain back on what's ahead: Can you dress yourself? Do you drool excessively? Only at night or during the day?
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