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NEWS
February 12, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
How close are we to THE ULTIMATE healing factor? As "Deadpool" explodes across the big screen this weekend, the antihero with extraordinary healing powers-that save him from everything from cancer to bullets - is not THATĀ far-fetched, according to renowned physician, and North Philadelphia native, Dr. Ronald Klatz . The author of 42 books including the bestseller Grow Young With HGH , Klatz is a bioscientist with a portfolio of dozens...
NEWS
February 3, 2016
ISSUE | BLIZZARD OF 2016 Turnpike should have been closed Behind the chaos of 500 motorists stranded on the Pennsylvania Turnpike for 24 hours in last month's blizzard is a fundamental question: Why did otherwise intelligent people put their lives at risk ("On turnpike, a blizzard of questions," Sunday)? Why did universities and businesses send their students and employees into the dangerous storm? And why did the Turnpike Commission not close the highway? Washington closed its Metro system from Friday evening through Sunday night.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
As a longtime nurse, Mary Lou Manning has seen some horrific infectious diseases, from AIDS to anthrax to Ebola. But Manning, who has published more than 35 articles on infectious diseases, focuses more on how to prevent the spread of infection in the first place. Manning's work as an ambassador for global infection prevention has taken her to numerous countries. In 2007, she joined a post-tsunami recovery team in Indonesia. During the recent Ebola crisis, Manning was on the faculty of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention safety training program for health-care workers going to West Africa.
SPORTS
December 24, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
It is July, and Leanne Purcell is playing summer league basketball with her Notre Dame teammates, working out every day to prepare for her final year of high school. Later that same month, she's the maid of honor at her sister Jaclyn's wedding. Next, it is Aug. 30, and Purcell is in Ocean City, N.J., with her father, Michael. She's reading Their Eyes Were Watching God on the beach. But something isn't right; her stomach is bothering her. The pain isn't normal, and it isn't cramping, either.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Tamela Oglesby was gasping for air. "It felt like my last breath," the 35-year-old nursing assistant said, reaching for her throat as she recounted that night one year ago. "I thought I was going to die. My heart was just beating, really, really fast. " Figuring it would be the fastest way there, she took a bus to Pennsylvania Hospital's emergency room, a few blocks from her Northern Liberties apartment. A chest X-ray revealed the diagnosis that changed her life in ways Oglesby could not have expected.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IS IT POSSIBLE to die of a broken heart? When Tony Lyle's longtime partner, Jim Clark, died in February, Tony's doctor suggested he take an antidepressant. "I'm not depressed," Tony insisted. But on Oct. 27, Tony died of a heart attack in his apartment on Rittenhouse Square. He was 79. "He was very upset by Jim's death," said Tony's niece, Alison Lyle Flowers. "Could it have been a broken heart? Who knows?" Anthony A. Lyle, who with his partner, James N. Clark, were active in caring for victims of the HIV/AIDS virus from the early days of the disease, was a longtime editor of the Pennsylvania Gazette, the University of Pennsylvania's prizewinning alumni magazine.
NEWS
November 5, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
"VIRGINIA ROSS started as a hugger," the Daily News' Ron Goldwyn wrote about her in 2001. Virginia visited hospitals "to hug and rock babies left behind by AIDS- and HIV-infected mothers," Goldwyn wrote. That kind of love and compassion for the sick and those "left behind" by sufferers marked Virginia's life of service to AIDS and HIV patients, as well as in education programs to call attention to the disease and ways to prevent its spread. Her particular emphasis was on the impact the dreaded disease has on the African-American community, where for many years it was a forbidden topic because of its association with homosexuality.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania task force called Wednesday for an increase in surveillance, education, and common-sense preventive measures to combat the increasing prevalence of Lyme disease. The panel did not issue any recommendations on treatment. But its 64-page report alluded to sharp disagreement on that topic among some of the members. No surprise, given that the task force was mandated by law to include both mainstream medical practitioners as well as representatives of a group that advocates months of high-dose antibiotics to treat patients with lingering symptoms.
NEWS
October 2, 2015
MENTION the word "health" and people usually think of doctors and hospitals. Those are the people and institutions that work to make individuals healthy. Public health has a broader mission - to make whole communities healthy. The first public health professionals were called "sanitarians," partly because of science's new found understanding of the link between disease and sanitation. It's hard to believe but Philadelphia did not begin to chlorinate its drinking water until 1913 - and that was decades after the link between typhoid and dirty water was a proven fact.
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