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NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Lewis Schotland, 84, of Wynnewood, an internationally known researcher into muscle disorders and for 38 years a leading figure in the University of Pennsylvania's neurology department, died Thursday, Aug. 13, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Schotland's career as an MD spanned almost 50 years. He arrived at Penn in 1967, rising through the ranks to become professor of neurology and, later, professor emeritus. He closed his lab in 1998 and retired from clinical practice in 2005.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
An employee at West Chester University has tested positive for Legionnaires' disease, and "higher-than-acceptable" levels of the bacteria that cause it were found in eight campus buildings, officials said Wednesday. Immediate steps were taken to kill the Legionella bacteria that were found in the buildings' cooling towers, Mark Mixner, vice president of administration and finance, wrote in a memo to the university's more than 1,000 employees. The university "engaged a remediation firm that is treating the affected cooling towers" Wednesday and Thursday to eliminate the bacteria and ensure they do not return, Mixner said.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just in time for peak tick season, the Pennsylvania Department of Health this week announced that Lyme disease cases went up by a whopping 25 percent in a single year. Given the state often has more cases of the tick-borne infection than any other, this might worry anyone who spends time in the woods. But experts say a lot goes into reports such as this one, some of it concerning, some perplexing - and some reassuring. "We know Lyme is out there," said Atmaram Nambiar, director of the Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the Department of Health.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greg Crawford's right wrist is covered with a half-dozen multicolored plastic bracelets. "Race for Adam," reads one, for a teen in Bethlehem, Pa. "Dillon's Army," reads another, in honor of a Maryland boy. "Fight for Jessica," reads a third, for a girl in Los Angeles. "I told them I'd never take them off until we have a cure," Crawford, 50, said. The children's families gave Crawford the bracelets in 2011, the second year he biked across the country to raise money for Niemann-Pick Type C Disease, a nervous system disorder that typically strikes children.
NEWS
May 24, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Netflix has distinguished itself in three years as a purveyor of serious, quality programming for grownups with shows such as House of Cards , Orange is the New Black and Bloodline . This year Netflix has been expanding its reach by going after younger viewers first with the comic book adventure Marvel's Daredevil which premiered last month and now with its YA offering, Between , a sci-fi thriller for the 21-and-under set that...
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first clue that something was wrong with his grandmother came when Bill Mikus walked with her to a restaurant in Reading that she often visited. "You want your regular?" the waitress asked. It turned out the regular was just coffee. "She doesn't come here to eat?" Mikus asked the waitress, flabbergasted. He took some time off work to investigate. His grandmother, who had helped raise him after his mother died, was then in her mid-80s and lived alone. Her refrigerator was nearly empty.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
She garnered worldwide acclaim - and an Oscar nomination - in 1997 for her role as a porn star in Boogie Nights . But Julianne Moore's breakout role came three years earlier, as Yelena in Louis Malle and Andre Gregory's Chekhov riff, Vanya on 42nd Street . On screen in virtually every scene, Moore radiated an aura both intelligent and sensual. A year later, she confirmed her ascendancy as a great actor in Todd Haynes' dystopian New Age satire Safe . The Boston University alumnus, who has made more than 60 films, finally won her first Oscar last year for Still Alice ,   a powerful drama about language, memory, and identity that was released Tuesday by Sony.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For Julia Wagner, conquering Lyme disease is personal. Eleven years ago, she came down with the tick-borne illness. Though most people recover quickly after a course of antibiotics, Wagner was among those who wound up with complex infections. Over the course of a year, she suffered dramatic neurological changes, temporarily losing her memory and her ability to express herself. Aggressive treatment eventually reversed her symptoms, she says, and inspired her to help others as president of the PA Lyme Resource Network.
NEWS
March 24, 2015
LAST Wednesday was Scott DiClaudio's lucky day. He won the political equivalent of the Mega Millions lottery. As one of 57 candidates seeking the Democratic nomination to Common Pleas Court, DiClaudio picked the lowest number in the lottery held by state election officials to determine ballot position. He will appear in the No. 1 spot for that job in the May 19 primary, making him a virtual shoo-in to win one of the 12 seats in the court being filled this year. He might as well go get measured for a black robe.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Dr. Jason Karlawish, For The Inquirer
When I was in medical school at the end of the 20th century, I was taught that Alzheimer's disease was a rare cause of dementia in middle-aged adults. The elderly had senility caused by an indecipherable mess of pathologies and aging. Now, in the 21st century, Alzheimer's is called an epidemic. It has even helped five-time nominee Julianne Moore win her first Academy Award. In Still Alice, based on the novel of the same title, Moore portrays professor Alice Howland, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and who suffers the relentless decay of her capacities.
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