CollectionsDisease
IN THE NEWS

Disease

NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I BUMPED into another guy at a party who I happen to know is a notorious womanizer and a disease carrier. Should I warn women that I see him with that he has herpes? He infected a friend of mine and every time I see him up in another female's face, I wonder if she's his next victim. Mia: I want to say "kick his a--" the next time you see him out, but that might get you arrested. So, I called the much cooler-headed Gary Bell, executive director of Blacks Educating Blacks About Sexual Health Issues, for his advice on what to do. Here's his advice: "He's making assumptions, first of all. He's assuming that he's behaving irresponsibly because he has in the past.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Gustavo D. Aguirre peered into the eyes of his small fluffy patient, a dog called a Coton de Tulear, he was surprised to see a small blob beneath the retina, almost like an egg yolk. Within a year, the blob had degenerated so it looked like scrambled eggs. It reminded Aguirre, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, of the symptoms in a form of human blindness called Best disease. Could the dog have a canine version of the same thing?
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Scientists have finally recovered stem cells from cloned human embryos, a goal that could lead to new treatments for such illnesses as Parkinson's disease and diabetes. A prominent expert called the work a landmark but noted that a different, simpler technique now under development may prove more useful. Stem cells can turn into any cell of the body, so scientists are interested in using them to create tissue for treating disease. Pancreatic tissue, for example, might be used to treat diabetes.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
IF I SAY "vegan rock star," Chrissie Hynde or Moby or Jason Mraz might come to mind. You wouldn't immediately think of T. Colin Campbell, 79, professor emeritus of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University. But Campbell's half-century of research in nutrition, hundreds of peer-reviewed papers and a key role in the world's most comprehensive study of health and nutrition, the "China Study," have surely made him a rock star in the plant-eating world. He summarized that groundbreaking study (which the New York Times called "the Grand Prix of epidemiology")
NEWS
April 18, 2013
An elderly woman who was found dead inside her burning South Philadelphia home Monday afternoon had died of heart disease before the fire occurred, the Medical Examiner's Office said Wednesday. Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Medical Examiner, identified the woman as Dorothy Powell, 84. Firefighters encountered heavy fire on the first floor of the home on the 2100 block of Pierce Street in Point Breeze, Executive Chief Richard Davison said. He said firefighters found Powell dead inside the home.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
By Ann Connor Parkinson's is a chronic, progressive neurological disease. It is hard to live with, yet there are far worse diseases to have. Nevertheless, since April is Parkinson's Awareness Month, let's, for a few paragraphs, shine a bright light on the dark, sobering realities of this disease. Some of the questions your neurologist asks while Parkinson's is in its early stages pull the curtain back on what's ahead: Can you dress yourself? Do you drool excessively? Only at night or during the day?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2013
WHAT WOULD you say if I told you that you could profoundly cut your risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer? Significantly decrease your risk for Alzheimer's disease, too? And, better yet, that you could do all this without spending a single dime? Impossible, right? Wrong. All that and more may be possible simply by following the sage advice of Dr. Michael Mosley, a British medical journalist and co-author of The FastDiet: Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, and Live Longer with the Simple Secret of Intermittent Fasting . The "Fast Diet" is all the rage in Britain and could take flight here as well.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
You know you're in trouble, Maria Kefalas said sadly, when you're fast-tracked for the Make-a-Wish Foundation. Kefalas, 45, is a St. Joseph's University sociologist whose daughter Calliope, 3, has a rare and untreatable genetic disease, MLD. It's a diagnosis without hope: Most patients don't live beyond age 5. Kefalas, along with her husband, Patrick Carr (also a sociologist), and their three children were sponsored for a trip to Martha's Vineyard over the summer by the foundation, which attempts to enrich the lives of children with life-threatening medical conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013
1Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon and rectum) is the second-leading cancer killer in the United States. 2Colon cancer is an equal opportunity disease, affecting men and women of all racial and ethnic groups and socio-economic backgrounds. 3Colon cancer is most often found in people older than 50, but some people may get the disease at a younger age, especially those with genetic predispositions. 4About 60 percent of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented with regular screenings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013
DEAR ABBY: I always knew high blood pressure ran in my family, but I never realized that it could cause kidney disease. Because I felt healthy, I hadn't worried about my "borderline" hypertension. Turns out, my kidneys were silently being damaged. I have since made lifestyle changes to control my blood pressure and prevent further damage. These include daily exercise and cutting back on salt, sweets and fast food. March is National Kidney Month, and March 14 is World Kidney Day. The National Kidney Foundation is urging Americans to learn their risk factors for kidney disease and to get their kidneys checked with a simple urine and blood test.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|