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Disease

NEWS
February 10, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JIM KOLLER was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, he wanted to find out all he could about the disease. He wanted to know, how could he, a fitness buff who thought nothing of a 24-mile bike ride from his home in Lafayette Hill to the Philadelphia Art Museum and back, contract the crippling, fatal disease named after the baseball player Lou Gehrig? How could he, a man who lifted weights and swam six days a week for 20 years, be afflicted with a disease that slowly destroys a person's ability to even flex a muscle?
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Jackson, 81, and his partner of more than 40 years, Myrna Roach, 74, are the kind of older people many of us would like to be one day. Both still work and are energetic enough to travel extensively. They take medicine for high blood pressure and he has diabetes, but they feel healthy. They like to join clinical trials and know from one that their mental abilities have been stable for years. Still, Roach has a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease. Jackson doesn't, but Alzheimer's is the disease he dreads above all others.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Joanna Pacini reached into the coffin and touched her son's face. For the first time in years, she saw the man she once knew. Gone was the angry Joseph Pacini who had threatened police on YouTube, the brooding, irrational son who called her Satan. He was again the handsome, successful middle child she called "Joey, my Joey. " His peaceful expression contrasted with their last encounter, on Dec. 30. She was preparing chicken cutlets in their Clifton Heights, Delaware County, kitchen while he raged about the pope.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
It will take six to eight weeks for tests to confirm whether the Delaware County man killed Tuesday in a police shooting had Huntington's disease, sources said. An autopsy released Friday on Joseph A. Pacini, 52, showed he died of multiple gunshot wounds, the medical examiner's report said. Pacini was in his car when he allegedly tried to run down officers who were attempting a traffic stop in Upper Darby. In response, police opened fire. According to Michael J. Chitwood, Upper Darby superintendent of police, Pacini was wounded five times in his head, neck, shoulders, and chest.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2014
HAPPY DAYS are here again, right? Stocks are up, the recession is over and employment continues to grow (though wages remain stagnant). Perhaps it's a renewed optimism over employment growth - or is it apathy over stagnant wages? - that kept two-thirds of U.S. voters from even bothering to vote last week. You may be asking what the Pennsylvania governor's race had to do with your fitness and health. Quite a bit, if you ask me. Gubernatorial elections have a real impact on our day-to-day lives.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
While there is much hopeful news these days on the cancer treatment front, a new report finds that many patients are suffering from unmet financial, emotional, and physical needs. Many struggle with serious anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty working, according to the Cancer Support Community report. As they live longer, patients say they need more help coping with long-term side effects. A significant portion have skimped on medical care and many have cut spending on food to save money.
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joshua Cutler had a thriving career as a network engineer for the federal government in 2006 when he suddenly fell ill. Cutler, of Winchester, Va., once had an active life as a young father who raced cars on weekends and enjoyed time with his family, but he suddenly found himself overcome with fatigue and feeling perpetually sick. He slept 18 or more hours a day. The consequences were catastrophic. He lost his house and car. His family struggled to keep its head above water. After a series of false starts, Cutler found a doctor who he said correctly diagnosed his condition as chronic Lyme disease and began a treatment plan that has made his condition marginally better.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is suing a Camden nonprofit, saying it compromised nearly 26,000 research tubes when a freezer door was left open in March. The tubes of blood and other fluids were stored at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research along Haddon Avenue, and would have been used to study the causes of Parkinson's disease, according to the lawsuit. It was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Fox's foundation, according to the suit, signed two contracts - one in 2010, the other 2011 - worth a combined $4.3 million to store the tubes at Coriell.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Move over, ice bucket challenge. Borrowing the basics of the numbingly shared social-media fad, physicians and staff at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital on Tuesday volunteered to be showered with tennis balls to benefit pancreatic cancer research. The "Bucket of Tennis Balls Challenge" honored Joe Strub of West Chester, an avid tennis player and information-systems technician who lost his battle with the disease four years ago at age 62. While the oft-publicized ice bucket challenge calls awareness to Lou Gehrig's disease and has raised more than $110 million to aid research in just a couple of months, Tuesday's event hopes to call similar attention to a disease that claims the lives of 33,000 Americans per year, according to Dr. Jonathan Brody.
NEWS
September 9, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her son did not want her to do it. The ice-bucket challenge might be too much for someone with ALS. But Mariah Fenton Gladis was tired of seeing everybody else have all the fun - and the satisfaction of raising money to combat a devastating disease for which there is no cure. So, late last month, the award-winning Malvern psychotherapist sat in the backyard of her Chester County home as her husband, Ron, flipped a bucket of ice water over her head. "No problem," Gladis says slowly in an online video.
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