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NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Taking a novel approach, the owners of The Stone Horse, the modest new dining place in Frazer, have fashioned a menu based on a survey of what local residents want in a restaurant. The result is an unexciting but acceptable menu with simple, traditional dishes that it would be hard to object to; combining these with decent preparation, the area's newest restaurant has a lot to offer. The most daring dish seems to be pecan-batter catfish with hush puppies; for the rest, we have baby back ribs, pork chops, veal loaf, strip steak, crab cakes and several grilled fish as blackboard specials.
FOOD
May 29, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the great joys of the table is vegetables, the food from nature's larder. Cookbook author Viana La Place celebrates that joy in Verdura: Vegetables Italian Style (William Morrow, $22.95). This is an exciting and well-structured book filled with easy-to-make recipes for colorful dishes steeped in hearty flavors. In Italian, verdura means vegetables. "From the beginning and all during my years of cooking, I have always found my greatest pleasure and truest expression through vegetables," she says.
FOOD
March 20, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
DEL MONTE VEGETABLE CLASSICS. 10 varieties. 99 cents to $1.29 per 9 1/2- to 10-ounce shelf-stable tray. BONNIE: The most common ways to process vegetables are to can or freeze. Unfortunately, this new line of "shelf-stable" Vegetable Classics from Del Monte seems to have chosen the worst characteristics from each type of processing. Like canned, these are high in sodium, ranging from 300 milligrams (Garden Duet) to 480 milligrams (Nacho Cheese Potato and Potatoes Au Gratin)
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Ship John Inn is neither "ship" nor "inn," but it is one of South Jersey's most charming restaurants. The place opened Feb. 14 in what used to be the Greenwich Inn along the Cohansey River deep in Cumberland County. While the building is the same, there's no comparison between the dark setting and desultory cuisine of the old Greenwich Inn and this sunshine-bright mecca for fine food. The restaurant is named after the Ship John, an American cargo ship that sank in 1797, after running aground in Delaware Bay near the mouth of the Cohansey.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long a fixture in Delaware County, the Lobster Pot in Wawa seems to have more lives than a cat and uniquely reinvents itself every couple of years. Never known for superb dining, the place was run for many years by John and Carol Meyers. When they retired and moved to Arizona in 1985, they left their restaurant in the hands of relatives, but hearing that things had gotten even worse, they returned to the area five years later and reclaimed their restaurant. They then did a smart thing and hired a good chef, changed the menu and management and began turning out very good seafood-based dishes.
FOOD
July 28, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
It's been a half dozen years since I review-visited Chinatown's Harmony Vegetarian Restaurant. In those days, Harmony's food seemed head and shoulders above the heavy-handed veggie fare served up elsewhere. Moreover, though the place was small and narrow, the pastel-pretty decor made dining here a whole lot more pleasant than it was at most of the plain-brown-wrapper health food restaurants of that time. And Harmony today? A few of the dishes sampled on recent review visits to the restaurant were very much like the gourmet treats I'd remembered.
FOOD
December 7, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Terry Thompson's newest cookbook, A Taste of the South (HPBooks, $9.95) is an informative softcover whose recipes are interestingly complemented with the history and development of Southern food. "In the South," Thompson said in an interview, "food is an integral part of society. Any time people get together, food is one of the motivating things in the event. " Thompson, who is in Philadelphia this week as a consultant at Cafe Nola on South Street, said that the catalyst for the book - she's also the author of Cajun-Creole Cooking (HPBooks)
NEWS
June 9, 2010
City Councilman Darrell L. Clarke says Philadelphians are tired of staring at cumbersome satellite equipment on roofs. His bill, approved Tuesday by the Rules Committee, presents landlords with a choice: relocate dishes to side or rear facades, or apply for official certification indicating that the front is the only location from which a building can receive a dish signal. - Matt Flegenheimer
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By John V.R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to some sprucing up and careful attention to its food, the St. Davids Inn has become a cozy place for an evening dinner. With a buffet dinner ($14.95 prix fixe) that changes each night, the Spencer room offers a comfortable experience in leisurely dining. Best of all, the food is quite nice. Although there's nothing terribly unfamiliar or startling about the dishes, several revel in rich sauces, and the variety is extensive enough to ensure that you won't go hungry no matter what your tastes.
NEWS
February 13, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As anyone who dines out can attest, the suburbs do not lack for Italian eateries or want of pasta. Ristorante La Locanda is classically typical, right down to its old-house location along a major road (Route 3) in an easily missed community (Edgmont). In atmosphere alone, La Locanda cultivates the old-school Italian dining scene, in which candlelight flickers in mirrors and widely spaced tables are arranged around statuary. The restaurant seats 250, but it comes across as much smaller, with dual fireplaces in one dining room and an arched doorway leading to another room, which has a chandelier hanging over a small fountain.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 22, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Deb Lutz was making a high-six-figure salary at Johnson & Johnson as vice president of marketing just three years ago. But her entrepreneurial spirit (she bought and sold professional baseball cards to help pay her way through Wharton undergrad, Class of 1991) and her other life as a foodie got the best of her. She ditched corporate America and went for a fresh start. Two years ago, at age 45, she opened a b.good franchise - a healthy, fast-casual restaurant that serves in-house-ground burgers, vegetable/fruit smoothies, and other fresh dishes in Marlton.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
David Cross does not look like a guy who would discuss sex in public. Clean-shaven and bespectacled, with a patriotic bow tie, white shirt, pressed khakis, and sensible close-cut hair, he is mild-mannered and soft-spoken - a seemingly gentle soul, for a one-time criminal lawyer. Yet, get him started, and Cross talks a blue streak about the sordid details of Philadelphia's most historic characters. Sure, he'll espouse the better-known virtues of our frisky founding fathers - the stuff of Benjamin Franklin and his prostitutes - but Cross can share the rarer tidbits, too. He'll speak about Gen. George Washington and his quest for the aphrodisiac Spanish Fly, and Thomas Jefferson's lustful ways with the local lionesses of Philadelphia society.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
It's probably good that restaurant workers' hours often don't pair well with prime-time viewing. Because budding food-service entrepreneurs have enough nightmares without imagining Gordon Ramsay rampaging through their kitchens, telling the world, one bleeped expletive at a time, that their signature dish is straight out of the freezer. Not that anything like that would happen on Feed the Beast . A different flavor of cautionary tale altogether, AMC's new drama premieres Sunday after Preacher , before moving to 10 p.m. Tuesdays two days later.
FOOD
May 20, 2016
Cook from the Boardwalk and beyond Fast-forward from spring to summer with The Jersey Shore Cookbook , a compendium of dishes - like blueberry scones and spaghetti and crabs - from beloved fine-dining restaurants, seafood shacks, and pancake houses from Cape May to Asbury Park. With tempting photos and chef profiles, the collection by Jersey food blogger Deborah Smith is a Shore dining guide and cookbook in one. - Samantha Melamed The Jersey Shore Cookbook by Deborah Smith, Quirk Books, $22.95 Botanical bowls for summer For dining on the deck or by the pool, these lovely serving dishes look amazingly close to porcelain, yet are made of melamine, and thus are lightweight, shatter-resistant, and dishwasher safe.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Vance Lehmkuhl, Staff Writer
With more than 100 people in attendance at Union Transfer Sunday afternoon, Blackbird Pizzeria recaptured the title of Best Vegan Cheesesteak in Philly. Having won the first contest in 2014, the beloved vegan pizza joint was ousted in 2015 by Royal Tavern but was favored this year by judges Stu Bykofsky, Lisa Tynes, Leila Vaughan, and Babette Josephs. Blackbird owner Mark Mebus said his team was "happy about it because the only thing we've changed since last year was the bread. " After experimenting with house-made rolls, the pizzeria switched to vegan baguettes from Metropolitan Bakery.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Feb. 23, 2016: Reader: After reading about the best Fishtown/Kensington spots, we decided to try Lloyd Whiskey Bar. The sweet potato Thai pork and chicken and waffle sliders were outstanding, as was the whiskey and beer lists. The bourbon sweet tea was a nice concoction. Another thing we loved about it was that the happy hour went until 8 p.m. – later than usual. Craig LaBan: I'm glad you liked Lloyd, definitely one of the slightly off-the-grid places Fishtowners call their own - great whiskey list at fair prices with a kitchen that doesn't hold back when it comes to creative takes on indulgent food (i.e.
FOOD
January 1, 2016 | Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A guy can eat a lot in a year. But I'm lucky I get to cherry-pick the best plates from one of the greatest restaurant cities in America. Of course, that makes it all the more difficult to choose my favorites. But when I close my eyes to remember the highlights from a year of restaurant reviews, Good Taste features, Crumb Tracker clues, and other stories, the most flavorful dishes return to my mind's table as vivid, hot, and fresh as the moment I first devoured them. And so here are my 15 best bites (in no particular order)
NEWS
December 11, 2015 | BY MAUREEN FITZGERALD, Inquirer Food Editor mfitzgerald@phillynews.com, 215-854-5744
NOT SO LONG AGO, the casserole was the MVP in the American dinner lineup, an easy and economical supper without fuss. Tuna-noodle; chicken and rice; ground beef and macaroni; these were the staples of many childhood dinners. But in this generation, many children have no familiarity with this comfort-food genre. "All the kids were asking, 'What's a casserole?' " said Susan Munafo, a volunteer at after-school cooking class at William Loesche Elementary in Northeast Philadelphia. "I guess people don't make them anymore.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | Beth D'Addono, Daily News
Four months after signing a historic nuclear accord with the U.S. and other western powers, Iran now has a seat at the world political table. Many details remain to be settled, though, and since negotiations generally go better over a shared meal, what better time for Iran's complex and unique culinary culture to get the spotlight? "The nuclear accord can only bode well to introducing people to Persian culture and food, which has been obscured for years by a veil of political animosity," said Louisa Shafia, the Philadelphia-born author of The New Persian Kitchen (Ten Speed Press)
FOOD
October 16, 2015 | Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Domino dish If you're feeling lucky, host a game night with plates to match. These porcelain appetizer dishes are designed by artist Jane Dixon. - Samantha Melamed Game Night Appetizer Plates, six for $24.95 at Crate & Barrel, Cherry Hill Mall, Cherry Hill, 856-662-5499   Canned beauties Tomato season may be just behind us, but you can still taste the local summer bounty by way of Stepped in What, tomato sauce made with Chadds Ford-grown tomatoes and basil.
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