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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1993 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Momi, a small, new eatery off South Street, is majoring in nostalgia foods with a '50s flavor. From its TV dinners and Ovaltine to the tables, tiles and dishes, this is a time warp to be tackled with knife and fork. Remember Rice Krispies Treats, those slightly sticky, somewhat sweet squares made from the popular crispy rice cereal and marshmallows? They set the stage here for a cast of food characters that includes Fluffernutters, Tater Tots, potluck dinners and Jello. And if you like, you can wash it all down with Tang before leaving for home, pockets filled with complementary molasses-flavored Mary Jane chewies and sticks of bubble gum. Momi (it's pronounced Mommy)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Every now and then you run into a restaurant that not only has good food, but does a super job in all the areas that make for enjoyable dining. The London Grill - practically a landmark in the Fairmount section - is such a place. It features creative dishes that are well thought out. Its menu is balanced. Service is excellent. And the dining rooms are comfortable and attractive - especially the glass- enclosed sun porch. I particularly like the way the various dishes are described on the menu.
FOOD
March 14, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Years before winning over diners with dishes like chowder-poached oysters and gnocchi with snails, Fitler Dining Room chef Robert Marzinsky had a different artistic vision: He and a group of fellow art-school graduates made site-specific installations using ceramics and other materials. Since the works were temporary, he said, "We recognized that, to some extent, the real work was when you documented it. You'd come back with 500 slides, and spend $300 to process the film. " Today, in his kitchen at 22d and Spruce, Marzinsky is still making things that are ephemeral and beautiful - and he still acknowledges the impulse to document those creations.
FOOD
December 8, 1996 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
We ordered three dim sum. Then soup for two. My dining partner and I were deep into choosing a third main dish when our Kingdom of Vegetarians waiter could no longer contain himself. "That's too much food," he said quietly. It was indeed far too much for a normal meal for two. But in terms of exploring the vast menu of Chinatown's newest vegetarian restaurant? It was just a teasing sample. The K of V kitchen routinely offers 36 dim sum, 14 soups and 112 main dishes, all of them meatless.
NEWS
December 9, 2007 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Supper, of course, is not quite what it used to be, which tended to be - within memory of your average baby boomer - home-cooked (for better or worse), severely limited in imagination (meat-and-potatoes wasn't just an expression), and eaten around a sturdy table. No use to bore you with the usual suspects that took it out - the Swanson TV dinner, longer workdays, golden arches, home-replacement meals. You know the list. Still there remains a vestigial hunger for the archetypal "supper," even if you never regularly had it; maybe especially if you never regularly had it. And more than a few restaurateurs have endeavored to offer echoes of those meals, real or imagined.
BUSINESS
April 11, 1994 | By Michael L. Rozansky, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two companies, DirecTV and United States Satellite Broadcasting, have made a big splash with their plans to beam digital television signals from satellites to pizza-size back-yard dishes, starting next month. But Primestar Partners, a Bala Cynwyd venture that also provides satellite TV service, has something they don't: customers. Seventy thousand of them. Perhaps with an eye toward the looming competition, Primestar last month started converting to digital transmission, which produces higher-quality sound and pictures and will expand its capacity from its initial 10 channels to 70. "The biggest advantage we've got by being out there already," Primestar president John J. Cusick said, "is we understand what the marketplace wants.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
An aspect of Korean dining that I enjoy is having eight or more small bowls placed in front of me, each filled with a different food. I stick the chopsticks into the one with kimchi; then I try some pressed fish from the bowl next to the dipping sauce. Good stuff. Nice way to eat. If you haven't yet sampled Korean food, here's your chance. Seoul Garden, which is on Spruce Sreet near 48th, has opened a second restaurant in Chinatown. And it's a pretty good one. The menu is wide-ranging, and you can enjoy the engaging Korean tabletop cooking.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From our booth seat inside Desi Village, a new, authentic Indian and Pakistani BYO, my party joked that we could be anywhere - even Kansas. That impression came mainly from our window view of a Best Western Hotel across the street. It seemed that somewhere in America, there was a similar scene: a nearly empty ethnic restaurant next to a hotel. The restaurant is usually the size of a bowling alley with a huge cast of casual servers - ditto for Desi Village on a recent Saturday night.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long after maverick homeowners began erecting homemade satellite dishes in the 1970s to intercept signals intended for legitimate cable-TV systems, satellite television was considered more a novelty for tinkerers than a serious threat to the cable industry. What a difference a few decades make. With cable rate increases outstripping inflation, and cable's satisfaction ratings among the lowest of any industry, satellite-TV providers are seeing their subscriber rolls swell. Of the 85 million U.S. households that subscribe to some type of pay-TV service, cable still owns more than 80 percent of the market, with about 69.5 million subscribers.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Jim Barnes remembers David Fogleman the kid, as just a twentysomething pup, cooking with wide-eyed ambition at the Inn Keeper's Kitchen attached to his Dilworthtown Inn. "He was constantly using all these expensive ingredients, experimenting with new food items and flavors from [magazines like] Art Culinaire," says Barnes, whose clientele at the classic inn might be described as anything but "experimental. " "I told him, 'You're killing me [on food cost],' " Barnes said. " 'If you'd like to go put someone else out of business, please, call me back when you figure it out.' " Barnes retells the story with some glee now, several years later, only because Fogleman eventually did call him back.
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