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Dishes

NEWS
February 25, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commercial use of satellite earth dishes continues to increase in Radnor Township, with the Zoning Hearing Board granting special exceptions last week to two more applicants for the antennas. The board, in 3-0 votes Thursday, granted the requests of Acme Supermarket at 311 E. Lancaster Ave. and Meredith Overbrook Partners at the Radnor Corporate Center, 100 Matsonford Rd. Both applicants, the board said, must shield the dishes from public view as a condition of use. More than a half-dozen special exceptions for the dishes have been granted by the board in the last 3 1/2 years, ever since an ordinance was adopted governing the antennas.
LIVING
December 11, 1992 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the daughter of the U.S. ambassador to Mexico, the little girl lived a privileged existence. She had everything: a private school, a chauffeured limousine - and a bad case of lead poisoning. Mexico City is notorious for its toxic smog, yet it didn't seem possible that this 9-year-old was contaminated in 1991 merely from breathing bad air. For one thing, none of her siblings had anywhere near the dangerous levels of lead in their blood. After conducting an extensive survey of the home of Ambassador John Negroponte, U.S. health officials traced the culprit to an unlikely source: the rustic Mexican bowl used for the punch served at diplomatic parties.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It had been some time since I enjoyed a good meal while a nearby phone rang off the hook. The last time was in high school, when dinner theaters were in vogue, and the phone in question was a stage prop. This time, the phone was real (though it had a theatrical r-r-ring) and merely part of the bustling take-out scene. At Ricardo's Restaurant, a cheery 65-seat eatery in one of Bryn Athyn's oldest buildings, you can get take-out as well as unhurried, sit-down meals with excellent service.
FOOD
January 24, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
On one of the coldest nights in recent memory, Cafe Einstein had the welcome coziness of a ski resort. A fire glowed through the see-through doors of the wood stove. There was soothing music mingling with the sounds of conversation in the background. Even the life-size bathing beauty in the painting on the back wall seemed comfy-warm. With the cafe's liquor license still in limbo, the guy behind the bar (Einstein's owner, as it turns out) was unhurried enough to recognize me as a reviewer.
FOOD
July 29, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be soul food aplenty today as the Black Family Reunion wraps up a three-day festival in Fairmount Park. The reunion, a celebration of the black family and black traditions, kicked off in Philadelphia and will travel to four other cities this year. It will include a variety of events and lots of food regularly found in the homes of black Americans. But it's hard to imagine any food to rival the dishes served up in Eva Ritter's West Mount Airy kitchen. Ribs and chicken.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Jim Barnes remembers David Fogleman the kid, as just a twentysomething pup, cooking with wide-eyed ambition at the Inn Keeper's Kitchen attached to his Dilworthtown Inn. "He was constantly using all these expensive ingredients, experimenting with new food items and flavors from [magazines like] Art Culinaire," says Barnes, whose clientele at the classic inn might be described as anything but "experimental. " "I told him, 'You're killing me [on food cost],' " Barnes said. " 'If you'd like to go put someone else out of business, please, call me back when you figure it out.' " Barnes retells the story with some glee now, several years later, only because Fogleman eventually did call him back.
FOOD
January 7, 2001 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Many years ago, I hitchhiked across Europe on my own, staying at and cooking my meals in youth hostels. I kept two foods in my backpack at all times - they really had to be significant because I had to schlepp them everywhere: several lemons and a head of garlic. With those two ingredients I could cook dishes that would make me happy at the end of a long day of walking and sight-seeing. Even today, I can't eat fish or seafood unless I have a nice fat wedge of lemon to squeeze over top. I find that almost anything I put in my mouth tastes livelier and fresher finished with a squeeze of fresh lemon.
NEWS
August 19, 2011
On the short list of those who have contributed to Philadelphia's image as "an American Paris" are Paul Philippe Cret, the architect who fashioned the Benjamin Franklin Parkway after the Champs Elysees, and Jinous Kazemi, resident fashionista and owner of Millésimé in Northern Liberties. Kazemi, who grew up in Tehran, Iran, and moved to Philadelphia in 1979, frequently hops the pond to France, her aesthetic home. There she looks for finds for her concept store, which she compares to Merci, the Paris retailer renowned for its quirky mix of high fashion, used books, furniture, and flowers.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2013 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tara McConnell has taken simple stoneware and turned it into kitchen gear QVC shoppers can't seem to get enough of. As chief designer and president of Temp-tations L.L.C. in Exton, McConnell is on the shopping channel twice a week, demonstrating tried-and-true 9-by-7-inch baking dishes and 21/2-quart cow-figure bakers. "This is so stinking cute," she said on a recent broadcast with host Mary Beth Roe, the camera lingering on a hand-painted casserole set. Only about 10 minutes into an hour-long show, Roe said 600 shoppers had already placed orders for cow- and chicken-theme ceramics.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Feb. 23, 2016: Reader: After reading about the best Fishtown/Kensington spots, we decided to try Lloyd Whiskey Bar. The sweet potato Thai pork and chicken and waffle sliders were outstanding, as was the whiskey and beer lists. The bourbon sweet tea was a nice concoction. Another thing we loved about it was that the happy hour went until 8 p.m. – later than usual. Craig LaBan: I'm glad you liked Lloyd, definitely one of the slightly off-the-grid places Fishtowners call their own - great whiskey list at fair prices with a kitchen that doesn't hold back when it comes to creative takes on indulgent food (i.e.
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