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NEWS
January 14, 1994 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Stay away from that dangerous lasagna! Stand back from that killer fettuccine Alfredo! In fact, maybe you should just forget Italian food. According to the food police, the fettuccine packs as much fat as three pints of Breyer's Butter Almond ice cream. Or five McDonald's Quarter Pounders. "Fettuccine Alfredo is the worst dish we've seen in 23 years of evaluating food," said Jayne Hurley, a nutritionist and co-author of a study of Italian dishes by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.
NEWS
February 25, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Commercial use of satellite earth dishes continues to increase in Radnor Township, with the Zoning Hearing Board granting special exceptions last week to two more applicants for the antennas. The board, in 3-0 votes Thursday, granted the requests of Acme Supermarket at 311 E. Lancaster Ave. and Meredith Overbrook Partners at the Radnor Corporate Center, 100 Matsonford Rd. Both applicants, the board said, must shield the dishes from public view as a condition of use. More than a half-dozen special exceptions for the dishes have been granted by the board in the last 3 1/2 years, ever since an ordinance was adopted governing the antennas.
LIVING
December 11, 1992 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the daughter of the U.S. ambassador to Mexico, the little girl lived a privileged existence. She had everything: a private school, a chauffeured limousine - and a bad case of lead poisoning. Mexico City is notorious for its toxic smog, yet it didn't seem possible that this 9-year-old was contaminated in 1991 merely from breathing bad air. For one thing, none of her siblings had anywhere near the dangerous levels of lead in their blood. After conducting an extensive survey of the home of Ambassador John Negroponte, U.S. health officials traced the culprit to an unlikely source: the rustic Mexican bowl used for the punch served at diplomatic parties.
NEWS
November 28, 2004 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It had been some time since I enjoyed a good meal while a nearby phone rang off the hook. The last time was in high school, when dinner theaters were in vogue, and the phone in question was a stage prop. This time, the phone was real (though it had a theatrical r-r-ring) and merely part of the bustling take-out scene. At Ricardo's Restaurant, a cheery 65-seat eatery in one of Bryn Athyn's oldest buildings, you can get take-out as well as unhurried, sit-down meals with excellent service.
FOOD
January 24, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
On one of the coldest nights in recent memory, Cafe Einstein had the welcome coziness of a ski resort. A fire glowed through the see-through doors of the wood stove. There was soothing music mingling with the sounds of conversation in the background. Even the life-size bathing beauty in the painting on the back wall seemed comfy-warm. With the cafe's liquor license still in limbo, the guy behind the bar (Einstein's owner, as it turns out) was unhurried enough to recognize me as a reviewer.
FOOD
July 29, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be soul food aplenty today as the Black Family Reunion wraps up a three-day festival in Fairmount Park. The reunion, a celebration of the black family and black traditions, kicked off in Philadelphia and will travel to four other cities this year. It will include a variety of events and lots of food regularly found in the homes of black Americans. But it's hard to imagine any food to rival the dishes served up in Eva Ritter's West Mount Airy kitchen. Ribs and chicken.
FOOD
January 7, 2001 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
Many years ago, I hitchhiked across Europe on my own, staying at and cooking my meals in youth hostels. I kept two foods in my backpack at all times - they really had to be significant because I had to schlepp them everywhere: several lemons and a head of garlic. With those two ingredients I could cook dishes that would make me happy at the end of a long day of walking and sight-seeing. Even today, I can't eat fish or seafood unless I have a nice fat wedge of lemon to squeeze over top. I find that almost anything I put in my mouth tastes livelier and fresher finished with a squeeze of fresh lemon.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pasta Blitz, the latest venture by the indefatigable Lamberti family, has opened without fanfare but with lots of good, home-cooked Italian dishes. The restaurant on Route 70 quietly replaced the unlamented Boccaccio 70 in September, but it was only a few weeks ago that a banner was strung alerting us to the new ownership. Despite its name, Pasta Blitz offers a lot more than just pasta dishes. The extensive menu includes a familiar range of southern Italian cuisine, all nicely prepared at moderate cost.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
IT'S THE TIME for resolutions, and no doubt eating healthier and sticking to a budget top many lists. Chef Ken's Café on Germantown Avenue in Mount Airy might help you take baby steps in the right direction. Soul food is often considered a nutritional minefield, and while Chef Ken's cuisine is anything but austere, it does make healthier substitutions to lower saturated fat while offering a value priced meal. Owner and executive chef Ken Roberts says, "It's not what you cook, but how you cook it. " His menu includes standard dishes such as BBQ chicken, collard greens and fried whiting, however, he eschews animal fats in cooking and substitutes canola or olive oil. He cooks all of his vegetables without meat or animal fat so that they are appropriate for vegetarians and also eliminates all pork from the dishes in order to avoid any dietary restrictions.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Upscale veg­an eateries in the Philadelphia area have a dirty lit­tle se­cret: "I'd say at least two-thirds of our cli­en­tele are not veg­e­tar­i­an," says Ross Olchvary, chef-own­er at New Hope's Sprig & Vine . "I think most of them are just looking for some­thing dif­fer­ent. " Rich Lan­dau, chef and co-own­er of Center City's Vedge , with his wife, Kate Jacoby, has observed a sim­i­lar pat­tern. "With so many celebrities like Bill Clin­ton, Mike Ty­son, and El­len De­Gen­er­es talking about eating veg­an, peo­ple re­al­ize that it's not just some cleanse, and it's not some hip­pie-dip­py diet of steamed beans and len­til loaf.
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