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Disneyquest

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BUSINESS
August 17, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
As if things didn't already look bad for the hole in the ground at 8th and Market streets. As if it wasn't bad enough for that hole to sit there, month after month, without so much as a bulldozer or construction worker to give it legitimacy. As if it didn't already look bad when developer Ken Goldenberg had to go begging, first to the Philadelphia Parking Authority, and then to powerhouse developer Ron Rubin, for cash to keep his DisneyQuest project afloat. Now, even Disney executives are seeding the storm clouds.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1999 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some of the new tenants planning to join the proposed DisneyQuest development at Eighth and Market Streets have some big ideas, if little experience. A Canadian company is planning to build a two-story aquarium with an acrylic tunnel cutting through a shark tank, and with jellyfish that perform like ballet dancers. A science-fiction theme restaurant and shop is proposed by a Florida company that says it will bring "dinnertainment" to Market East. And Regal Cinemas plans to build a 17-screen movie theater.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | By Susan Warner and Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Street yesterday declared the $167 million DisneyQuest entertainment center proposed for Eighth and Market Streets dead, but the developers said they can still feel a pulse. "The original Disney project, to put it as bluntly as I can, is dead," Street said at a media briefing. He said it may be possible for the city to renegotiate a development deal that would include Disney. The developers - the Goldenberg Group of Blue Bell, and the Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust of Center City - insisted yesterday that the project is being redesigned and that discussions are still alive.
NEWS
January 24, 2000
Ed Rendell was a hell of a deal maker, but no demon for details. As an example we offer the troubled - and troubling - DisneyQuest development. This multi-million-dollar project promised to bring suburbanites and their kids back to Center City with an entertainment center that screamed Disney. It seemed like an enticing project in 1998 and worth the city's financial support. But so far all that developers, headed by Ken Goldenberg, have delivered is a giant hole at 8th and Market.
NEWS
April 1, 2000 | by Erin Einhorn , Daily News Staff Writer
There are only so many stars to wish upon in real estate, and the developers struggling to bring the DisneyQuest entertainment center to East Market Street have apparently used their last. One day after City Councilman Frank DiCicco characterized plans for a virtual-reality indoor theme park as "on life support," Mayor Street yesterday pulled the plug on the ventilator. The project, which has faced construction delays, money problems and difficulty finding tenants, and which two months ago asked the city for an additional $35 million in public financing, "is off life support," Street said yesterday.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1999 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pity the other dads when Ken Goldenberg's kids are asked what their father does for a living. "What's Daddy doing downtown?" asks Goldenberg as his 4- and 6-year-old boys squirm in his lap. "DisneyQuest!" they squeal as they leap off their father's lap and slide down his legs. And for dad, who is home in Chestnut Hill with a pinched nerve in his back, DisneyQuest, the virtual-reality theme park he is developing at Eighth and Market Streets, has been quite a ride. A developer of suburban shopping centers, Goldenberg, sort of by accident, has stepped into the $168 million Disney development and, with it, the enormous pressure to make DisneyQuest the showcase of a revitalized Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DisneyQuest, the Center City indoor theme park whose construction has been delayed, is now expected to open in the first half of 2001. "There have been some delays, but at this point we are moving forward," said Karen Drasler, a spokeswoman for DisneyQuest in Burbank, Calif. The $167 million development, which is scheduled to include movie theaters, shops and restaurants, was announced with great fanfare last December. At the time, Mayor Rendell and DisneyQuest officials predicted Disney's high-tech arcade would be open by July 2000 in time for the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 19, 2003 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developers paved over the hole in the ground at Eighth and Market Streets for a parking lot, but the city can't pave over the hole in taxpayers' pockets created by the failed DisneyQuest project. Taxpayers will eventually shell out more than $44 million, city officials now concede. That includes money to pay back bonds on a never-built parking garage planned to serve the grandiose DisneyQuest complex. When the city gave up hope of getting a project in the area, a Philadelphia Parking Authority spokesman, in July 2002, estimated costs to the public at $10 million.
LIVING
December 16, 1998 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cindy Seldin looked around nervously and confided that, despite its place in the hallowed, palm-treed pantheon of Walt Disney World, Tomorrowland might just be . . . yesterday's news. Not that she was trying to diss the Diz, she explained, it's just that, living as she does practically around the corner from the famed theme park, she is spoiled. After committing every dip and divot of Space Mountain to memory and having taken stroll after stroll down Main Street U.S.A. during 25 years' worth of visits, Seldin admits that her theme-park standards are about as high as the spire atop Cinderella's Castle.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Too busy for that family vacation in the great outdoors? Then you're a customer for DisneyQuest. Rather than sweat in the mountains - and pay the airfare and slap the mosquitoes - you'll be able to drive downtown, climb into a raft and shoot the whitewater rapids at Eighth and Market. Simulated rapids, of course. Or, you'll customize your own roller-coaster ride, climb into a capsule and zoom around in curlicues while never leaving the same spot. Thank computers for that experience.
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NEWS
January 11, 2013 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
AFTER 85 YEARS as a grand temple to consumerism, the Gimbel Brothers Department Store was demolished in 1979, at a time when Philadelphia thought the next great thing was about to happen on East Market Street. We're still waiting. Next up for the south side of Market Street between 8th and 9th streets - dominated for more than three decades by parking lots - is a proposal for the city's second casino license. "I think East Market Street is still as critical an artery as exists in Philadelphia," said Ken Goldenberg, the developer leading the investors seeking the license.
NEWS
December 15, 2004 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developer Kenneth N. Goldenberg announced plans yesterday to build a retail, entertainment and residential complex in Center City. A Target department store would be the centerpiece of the development, Pavilion East, at Eighth and Market Streets. That is the site where Goldenberg tried in the late 1990s - with big financial help from the city - to build a DisneyQuest indoor amusement park. The Walt Disney Co. pulled out of the project in 2000, and later gave up on the DisneyQuest concept.
NEWS
December 22, 2003
Abortion protesters prefer bullying to lobbying Thank you for publishing Tomasina Chamberlain's commentary about protesters at Planned Parenthood of Chester County ("Intimidation does not equal free speech," Dec. 17). As the headline noted, harassment and intimidation of Planned Parenthood's clients are not free speech. This type of homegrown terrorism should not be ignored by citizens, law enforcement agencies, or politicians. Women seeking reproductive services, including legal abortion, have the right to enter clinics without fear of verbal abuse or other interference.
NEWS
November 19, 2003 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developers paved over the hole in the ground at Eighth and Market Streets for a parking lot, but the city can't pave over the hole in taxpayers' pockets created by the failed DisneyQuest project. Taxpayers will eventually shell out more than $44 million, city officials now concede. That includes money to pay back bonds on a never-built parking garage planned to serve the grandiose DisneyQuest complex. When the city gave up hope of getting a project in the area, a Philadelphia Parking Authority spokesman, in July 2002, estimated costs to the public at $10 million.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2003 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Real estate developer Kenneth Goldenberg is best known for what became infamous as "the hole in the ground" at Eighth and Market Streets. That project started as an ambitious DisneyQuest-centered entertainment center, then collapsed. Goldenberg, who still owns the site, had dug a hole in 1999 to start construction for Disney. Now the hole has been filled, and Goldenberg is attracting attention in other ways. For example, he recently worked through vociferous opposition from seaport interests and won the right to put an Ikea store on an old South Philadelphia rail yard.
NEWS
August 23, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Erik Moe has a few ideas about what should replace the giant hole at Eighth and Market Streets that's been sitting there since the DisneyQuest development failed to materialize. How about an underground cultural center topped by a glass tower that would be the hub for a gondola system serving the entire city? And at the foot of the tower: a really great french fry stand. "It's an underutilized transportation mode and they would provide beautiful views," Moe, a South Philadelphia resident and soon to be Temple University student, said of his gondolas.
BUSINESS
August 18, 2002 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Please Touch Museum, long a cornerstone of the city's dream of a tourism magnet at Penn's Landing, now is looking for other places to go. It is willing to entertain offers from anyone with a development site or an idea for new quarters to accommodate the museum's present exhibits and expansion plans. The museum waited five years while retail developer Melvin Simon delayed plans to build a $329 million entertainment-retail center, in which the museum was to have been a key player.
NEWS
August 14, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Down inside The DisneyHole, that bleak pit at Eighth and Market Streets, the backhoes were roaring. And up on the street, outside the chain-link fence surrounding the parking lot turned hole in the ground, Albo Jeavons and his friends were snagging passers-by and asking some pointed questions. "Did you know the city is turning this back into a parking lot?" Jeavons, Ken Carl and Kent Latimer asked pedestrians as they passed out flyers emblazoned: "Save the DisneyHole!" A young man on a bicycle who stopped to take a flyer shook his head.
NEWS
August 9, 2002
THIS WEEK'S regret resurfaces from Dec. 11, 1998. Philadelphia was buzzing with anticipation over DisneyQuest, the Mickey Mouse megaplex chock-full of restaurants, virtual reality games and other dazzling Disney devices. Even before the first brick was laid, DisneyQuest was deemed the Magic Kingdom of Market Street, a giant stride in the city's plan to revitalize Center City. The People Paper had this to say about the Disney invasion: "That's why a DisneyQuest in Center City is ultimately a good thing and the $7.5 million the city intends to spend on improving East Market Street, where the theme park will locate, is a good investment . . . Mayor Rendell is right to feel the Disney deal is a win for the city.
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