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Disorder

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Among the many stark and graphic contrasts in Katherine Gilday's consideration of women, weight and food in The Famine Within, none is more telling than the shot of a little girl in a high chair happily stuffing herself. At the nearby table, her mother and the other ladies pick at their abstemious salads with feigned and fastidious indifference. It is an image of the beginning and the end result of a love-hate relationship with life's basic commodity. Gilday's ambitious and highly accomplished documentary is a cogent study of how and why it exists.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Mike Birbiglia, Mr. Transmedia? Since 2008, when he first clambered on stage to turn his professional and relationship woes and weird sleep disorder into a painfully funny monologue, the mild-mannered comedian and storyteller has morphed Sleepwalk With Me into a hit one-man Off-Broadway show; a best-selling book; a running narrative on NPR's This American Life ; and now, a movie, cowritten by, directed by, and starring one Mike Birbiglia....
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Lorraine Rocco, Special to The Inquirer
Snoring is no laughing matter. In fact, says Dr. Armando A. Montiel of Marlton, it sometimes can be fatal. But, because the person who snores excessively often is unaware of it, it is usually a spouse who brings the patient to see the doctor. So when Montiel hears a wife say to her husband, "Honey, keep quiet and let me tell the doctor all about it," he knows exactly what to expect next. "She'll say, 'He scares me . . . he snores loudly and then he stops breathing. He's grouchy and moody during the day, and he falls asleep at the drop of a hat. " These, say Montiel, are the classic symptoms of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the patient has repeated episodes of excessive snoring followed by a cessation of breathing.
NEWS
January 15, 2002 | By Jodi Enda INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An independent expert said yesterday that President Bush's fainting on Sunday, which his White House doctor attributed to a pretzel that he had difficulty swallowing, might well be a swallowing disorder that is uncommon but rarely life-threatening. William Ravich, clinical director of the swallowing center at Johns Hopkins University Medical School in Baltimore, said that when swallowing leads to fainting, it often is the result of a drop in blood pressure caused by a disorder called vasovagal syncope.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
Need a little kick-start to put your house in order? The experts we consulted offered these coping mechanisms. Have a candid friend walk through your home and give it to you straight about what is unacceptable. Set realistic deadlines for starting and finishing clean-ups. Even conquering one room in a calendar year is balm for a guilty conscience. Try working from the simplest tasks to the most challenging, to keep from feeling overwhelmed. Set a timer to make the task finite.
SPORTS
July 22, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
William "The Refrigerator" Perry failed to appear yesterday at the opening of the Chicago Bears' summer training camp, and the team said the huge defensive tackle was entering a program for treatment of an eating disorder. The Bears issued a statement after Perry did not attend the team's first meeting last night. The statement said Perry had entered the program voluntarily. "The Bears are in agreement with Perry that this is a medical matter, and the Bears will have no further comment at this time," the statement said.
NEWS
April 30, 2014
The Philadelphia courts' long-standing failure to ensure that drug convicts' driver's licenses were suspended illustrates the danger of government by ward heelers. It also reminds us that professional bureaucrats can botch the job just as badly. The Inquirer reported this week that for at least a decade, the city courts did not report drug convictions to the state Department of Transportation as required by law. That means tens of thousands of license suspensions that should have taken place did not, sometimes leaving dangerous drivers on the road.
NEWS
June 23, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Kate Olsen has entered rehab to treat an eating disorder. "She made a very courageous, precautionary decision," Michael Pagnotta, the Olsen twins' rep, told USA Today. "Mary-Kate is taking charge in making this decision. She wants to be healthy. " Rumors that the brunet Olsen, who turned 18 on June 13, had a disorder had been making the rounds for months, with Star mag printing photos of a harrowingly thin Mary-Kate just weeks ago. Both Mary-Kate and Ashley, who are each worth about $150 mil, have cheerfully waved off rumors about drug and alcohol abuse and eating disorders, Ashley telling People mag last month, "We don't have problems!
LIVING
October 27, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christina Pearson says she started pulling out her hair when she was 12. By 14, she had no hair left on her head. "I thought, 'I don't see anyone else doing this - I must be the only one,' " said the 41-year-old businesswoman who runs a voice-mail company in Santa Cruz, Calif. "I thought I must be completely defective. " Then, at the age of 33, she learned that thousands of people, perhaps a million, suffer from the same problem, known as trichotillomania. Surveys show at least one in 200 people engages in some degree of hair pulling, experts say. Therapists and patients from around the country will convene in Philadelphia this week for a conference devoted to this common, but often unrecognized, condition.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Carrying a toothbrush and change of clothes, Charles Woodard of Stratford was ready for one of the most important evenings of his life. Before his wife read a magazine article on sleep laboratories, he never expected that there would be a medical explanation for his problem. According to Woodard, his family has complained for the last five years that his snoring is so loud that it keeps them awake at night and that during the day, he simply cannot keep his eyes open. "I've stopped driving because I fall asleep at the wheel," he told Eva Morozsan, respiratory care director at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals/Stratford Division, which opened in 1981 as the first sleep laboratory in South Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Ellen Gray
YOU, ME AND THE APOCALYPSE 8 p.m. Thursday, NBC10. Maybe the end really is near. In the same week Fox brought back The X-Files and launched the comical cop show Lucifer - about you-know-who - NBC has found the funny in the end of the world. Turns out it was waiting on the other side of the Atlantic. You, Me and the Apocalypse, which premieres Thursday, was made in Britain for people who drive on the wrong side of the road, but it should be right at home on NBC, thanks to a cast that includes Jenna Fischer ( The Office )
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take a deep breath. How often do you hear someone give that advice for calming down? Maybe you give it to yourself. You may be surprised to learn that a new biofeedback treatment for panic disorder suggests just the opposite. The at-home treatment, which uses a machine called Freespira that measures respiration rate and carbon-dioxide levels in exhaled breath, trains patients to breathe slowly and shallowly, with an emphasis on more complete exhalation than many of us are used to. A small early study found that 68 percent of patients were panic-free a year after training with the device for a month.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nemours Children's Health System and the Clinic for Special Children in Lancaster County signed a five-year agreement to collaborate on the care of children with rare genetic disorders, the two tax-exempt organizations announced. As part of the arrangement, the Clinic for Special Children will help Nemours develop medical services for the Old Order Amish community near Dover, Del. The clinic, near Strasburg, Pa., was founded in 1989 to treat Old Order Amish and Mennonite children with genetic disorders.
NEWS
September 18, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday unleashed a Donald Trump-style verbal beating on City Controller Alan Butkovitz, labeling his report on L&I "outrageous," "misguided" and "irresponsible. " "The controller seems to desperately seek public attention and relevance in any number of ways," Nutter said. "We're not going to get distracted by that kind of nonsense or ego or narcissistic personality disorder that seems to compel the need for constant public attention," Nutter continued. Butkovitz's special investigation report, issued yesterday, on the troubled city department calls on Mayor Nutter to fire Licenses and Inspections Commissioner Carlton Williams, citing excessive overtime, dangerous illegal demolitions and nonpermitted construction projects.
NEWS
September 7, 2015
Pain disorder forum The Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association invites people with complex regional pain syndrome/reflex sympathetic dystrophy (CRPS/RSD), their caregivers, family, friends, and supporters to a conference at the Crowne Plaza Philadelphia-Cherry Hill on Friday. The organization has assembled a forum where attendees and experts can share information, network, and explore new solutions to help manage the condition. There will be an awareness walk the next day in Cooper River Park.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
A distraught medical student rushed over to me during a sick clinic usually devoted to fairly benign matters such as colds and minor rashes. "I think something is really wrong with this patient", the student told me. "He can't walk. " The 10-year-old in the exam room had suddenly lost the use of his legs for no apparent reason. His father and uncle carried him into our waiting room, with his mother and aunt by his side. "He was fine yesterday - then, this morning, he couldn't walk," the boy's father told me. I quickly glanced at the child and saw he was coherent and in no apparent pain.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pizza, pizza, pizza, chicken fingers, pizza, buttered noodles, pizza. This is a typical week of eating for Corey Fader, 19, an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. An otherwise well-adjusted man with plenty of friends, who also juggles a job at a start-up and loves photography, Fader is a picky eater. We all know picky eaters. Most are children. And then there is the occasional adult who takes drastic, sometimes odd, measures with food. Disemboweling sandwiches in an effort to avoid the onions, or picking mushrooms off of pizzas because of the "slime" factor.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A MAN WHO voiced displeasure outside a Criminal Justice Center courtroom in April - after which cops confronted him and a female public defender came to his aid - pleaded guilty yesterday to a summary offense of disorderly conduct. Under a negotiated plea deal between the prosecution and the defense, Anthony C. Jones, 23, was then sentenced by Municipal Judge Charles Hayden to "no further penalty. " Jones' case made news because the public defender who came to his aid, Paula Sen, reportedly was punched in the head by a cop who was trying to tackle Jones.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: When I married my husband, I knew we both had pieces of ourselves under lock and key. I used to be a staunch defender that we are all allowed a private room in our minds, so to speak, where we store memories, thoughts, and feelings that, while formative of our current personalities, didn't really need to be shared with the other person. (Does H. really need to know I have a secret crush on Tommy Lee Jones?) I know my husband has a similar lockbox - he never told me about running away for quite a while as a teenager.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE 10 PEOPLE arrested at a Lawncrest town-hall meeting in March protesting the death of Brandon Tate-Brown in Mayfair were acquitted yesterday, eliciting shouts of joy inside the Criminal Justice Center. They had shown up at the meeting, where District Attorney Seth Williams and Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey were present, to protest the District Attorney's Office's decision to not file charges against two cops involved in the fatal shooting of Tate-Brown, 26, in December. Municipal Judge Joyce Eubanks, after viewing a nine-minute video of the loud and noisy protest, and after hearing testimony from prosecution witnesses - primarily police Civil Affairs Unit Lt. Joseph O'Brien and community activist Greg Bucceroni - acquitted all 10. The 10 included Mallori Lofton-Malachi, 27, a professional soccer player; her sister, Megan Malachi, 34; and their sister, Morgan Malachi, 32. They also included Asa Khalif, a/k/a Earl Pittman, 44, who is a cousin of Tate-Brown's; and Scott Williams, 26, a University of Pennsylvania student.
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