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Disorder

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Among the many stark and graphic contrasts in Katherine Gilday's consideration of women, weight and food in The Famine Within, none is more telling than the shot of a little girl in a high chair happily stuffing herself. At the nearby table, her mother and the other ladies pick at their abstemious salads with feigned and fastidious indifference. It is an image of the beginning and the end result of a love-hate relationship with life's basic commodity. Gilday's ambitious and highly accomplished documentary is a cogent study of how and why it exists.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Mike Birbiglia, Mr. Transmedia? Since 2008, when he first clambered on stage to turn his professional and relationship woes and weird sleep disorder into a painfully funny monologue, the mild-mannered comedian and storyteller has morphed Sleepwalk With Me into a hit one-man Off-Broadway show; a best-selling book; a running narrative on NPR's This American Life ; and now, a movie, cowritten by, directed by, and starring one Mike Birbiglia....
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Lorraine Rocco, Special to The Inquirer
Snoring is no laughing matter. In fact, says Dr. Armando A. Montiel of Marlton, it sometimes can be fatal. But, because the person who snores excessively often is unaware of it, it is usually a spouse who brings the patient to see the doctor. So when Montiel hears a wife say to her husband, "Honey, keep quiet and let me tell the doctor all about it," he knows exactly what to expect next. "She'll say, 'He scares me . . . he snores loudly and then he stops breathing. He's grouchy and moody during the day, and he falls asleep at the drop of a hat. " These, say Montiel, are the classic symptoms of sleep apnea, a disorder in which the patient has repeated episodes of excessive snoring followed by a cessation of breathing.
NEWS
January 15, 2002 | By Jodi Enda INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An independent expert said yesterday that President Bush's fainting on Sunday, which his White House doctor attributed to a pretzel that he had difficulty swallowing, might well be a swallowing disorder that is uncommon but rarely life-threatening. William Ravich, clinical director of the swallowing center at Johns Hopkins University Medical School in Baltimore, said that when swallowing leads to fainting, it often is the result of a drop in blood pressure caused by a disorder called vasovagal syncope.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
Need a little kick-start to put your house in order? The experts we consulted offered these coping mechanisms. Have a candid friend walk through your home and give it to you straight about what is unacceptable. Set realistic deadlines for starting and finishing clean-ups. Even conquering one room in a calendar year is balm for a guilty conscience. Try working from the simplest tasks to the most challenging, to keep from feeling overwhelmed. Set a timer to make the task finite.
SPORTS
July 22, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
William "The Refrigerator" Perry failed to appear yesterday at the opening of the Chicago Bears' summer training camp, and the team said the huge defensive tackle was entering a program for treatment of an eating disorder. The Bears issued a statement after Perry did not attend the team's first meeting last night. The statement said Perry had entered the program voluntarily. "The Bears are in agreement with Perry that this is a medical matter, and the Bears will have no further comment at this time," the statement said.
NEWS
April 30, 2014
The Philadelphia courts' long-standing failure to ensure that drug convicts' driver's licenses were suspended illustrates the danger of government by ward heelers. It also reminds us that professional bureaucrats can botch the job just as badly. The Inquirer reported this week that for at least a decade, the city courts did not report drug convictions to the state Department of Transportation as required by law. That means tens of thousands of license suspensions that should have taken place did not, sometimes leaving dangerous drivers on the road.
NEWS
June 23, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary-Kate Olsen has entered rehab to treat an eating disorder. "She made a very courageous, precautionary decision," Michael Pagnotta, the Olsen twins' rep, told USA Today. "Mary-Kate is taking charge in making this decision. She wants to be healthy. " Rumors that the brunet Olsen, who turned 18 on June 13, had a disorder had been making the rounds for months, with Star mag printing photos of a harrowingly thin Mary-Kate just weeks ago. Both Mary-Kate and Ashley, who are each worth about $150 mil, have cheerfully waved off rumors about drug and alcohol abuse and eating disorders, Ashley telling People mag last month, "We don't have problems!
LIVING
October 27, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christina Pearson says she started pulling out her hair when she was 12. By 14, she had no hair left on her head. "I thought, 'I don't see anyone else doing this - I must be the only one,' " said the 41-year-old businesswoman who runs a voice-mail company in Santa Cruz, Calif. "I thought I must be completely defective. " Then, at the age of 33, she learned that thousands of people, perhaps a million, suffer from the same problem, known as trichotillomania. Surveys show at least one in 200 people engages in some degree of hair pulling, experts say. Therapists and patients from around the country will convene in Philadelphia this week for a conference devoted to this common, but often unrecognized, condition.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Carrying a toothbrush and change of clothes, Charles Woodard of Stratford was ready for one of the most important evenings of his life. Before his wife read a magazine article on sleep laboratories, he never expected that there would be a medical explanation for his problem. According to Woodard, his family has complained for the last five years that his snoring is so loud that it keeps them awake at night and that during the day, he simply cannot keep his eyes open. "I've stopped driving because I fall asleep at the wheel," he told Eva Morozsan, respiratory care director at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals/Stratford Division, which opened in 1981 as the first sleep laboratory in South Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Shannon Frost Greenstein had rules about food: No butter on her toast. No red meat. At Thanksgiving, she nibbled on mashed potatoes and bread. At Starbucks, her go-to drink was a fat-free, sugar-free hot chocolate. "I'll eat later," she would tell friends. "I'm not hungry right now. " Greenstein, a 5-foot-8 former dance major, became fixated on her weight as it rose from 115 pounds to 130 in college, then dropped to 110 by her late 20s. "My scale would dictate my mood for the day," she says.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Suzanne Wright, 69, a cofounder of the advocacy group Autism Speaks, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at her home in Fairfield, Conn., an organization spokeswoman said. She helped build the group into one of the leading voices for people with the developmental disorder. She and her husband, former NBC Universal CEO Bob Wright, founded Autism Speaks in 2005 after their grandson's diagnosis. The New York-based organization funds research, raises awareness, and spotlights the needs of people with autism and their families.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | Ajay Pillai, M.D., For The Inquirer
Q. How can I tell if I have a sleep disorder? A. There is no substitute for a good night's rest. Yet more than one quarter of the population report occasionally not getting enough sleep, and nearly 10 percent have chronic insomnia, according to federal surveys. Sleep needs vary. But seven to eight hours a day is recommended for adults, including the elderly. A sleep disorder is characterized by a disruption in the amount or quality of sleep, or by behavioral/psychological conditions associated with sleep.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
BELLEVILLE, Pa. - Keith Weaver, 13, inherited his ancestors' bright blue eyes, light brown hair, and a metabolic disorder diagnosed at birth that everyone thought probably wouldn't cause him much trouble. People with propionic acidemia lack an enzyme needed to fully digest protein, potentially leading to serious health issues and even death. After the condition was found in a routine screening for newborns, Keith's doctors in Ohio prescribed a special, low-protein diet and routine monitoring.
NEWS
July 25, 2016
A research letter published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry found that Medicare beneficiaries had the highest and most rapidly growing rate of "opioid use disorder. " Six of every 1,000 recipients struggle with the condition, compared with one out of every 1,000 patients covered through commercial insurance plans. The letter also concluded that Medicare beneficiaries may face a treatment gap. In 2013, doctors prescribed a high number of opioid prescription painkillers for this population, but far fewer prescriptions for buprenorphine- naloxone, the only effective drug therapy for opioid use disorder covered by Medicare Part D. More than 300,000 Medicare recipients battle with opioid use disorder, according to the study.
NEWS
May 3, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS Pet of the Week is Dotty, a loving 9-year-old domestic short-hair cat at the Pennsylvania SPCA. Dotty is getting a bit tired of spending her golden years in a cage. She loves to be petted and to lounge around and would be content just snoozing in a window of her own every day. She has a disorder called FLUTD so she needs to eat a diet of mostly wet food and kept in a low stress environment. Dotty is already spayed and FIV/FELV negative. Give her a chance to love you and we guarantee you won't be disappointed.
NEWS
March 31, 2016
ISSUE | BIPOLAR DAY There is help, hope World Bipolar Day is marked annually on March 30. Bipolar disorder is a medical condition of the brain in which a person's moods swing back and forth like the winds of March. Diagnosed individuals - who encompass all ages, from children on up - can do quite well. Oscar-winning actress Patty Duke, 69, who died Tuesday, suffered from the disorder. What's needed is an excellent psychiatrist, a psychotherapist, and a support group, in which people like us learn from one another.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Ellen Gray
YOU, ME AND THE APOCALYPSE 8 p.m. Thursday, NBC10. Maybe the end really is near. In the same week Fox brought back The X-Files and launched the comical cop show Lucifer - about you-know-who - NBC has found the funny in the end of the world. Turns out it was waiting on the other side of the Atlantic. You, Me and the Apocalypse, which premieres Thursday, was made in Britain for people who drive on the wrong side of the road, but it should be right at home on NBC, thanks to a cast that includes Jenna Fischer ( The Office )
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take a deep breath. How often do you hear someone give that advice for calming down? Maybe you give it to yourself. You may be surprised to learn that a new biofeedback treatment for panic disorder suggests just the opposite. The at-home treatment, which uses a machine called Freespira that measures respiration rate and carbon-dioxide levels in exhaled breath, trains patients to breathe slowly and shallowly, with an emphasis on more complete exhalation than many of us are used to. A small early study found that 68 percent of patients were panic-free a year after training with the device for a month.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nemours Children's Health System and the Clinic for Special Children in Lancaster County signed a five-year agreement to collaborate on the care of children with rare genetic disorders, the two tax-exempt organizations announced. As part of the arrangement, the Clinic for Special Children will help Nemours develop medical services for the Old Order Amish community near Dover, Del. The clinic, near Strasburg, Pa., was founded in 1989 to treat Old Order Amish and Mennonite children with genetic disorders.
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