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Dispatchers

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NEWS
January 20, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
It's nice to have friends in high places. Just ask Westville police dispatchers Rose Smith and Sue Sampson. On Jan. 11, Smith and Sampson watched from a window at the Police Department as five burly Teamsters picketed the Westville Municipal Building on their behalf. The next day the borough mayor and council were put on notice by a Teamsters business agent and attorney. And soon, every entrance and exit to Westville may be blocked by pickets - a move that could halt deliveries to all businesses in the 1-square-mile borough.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Michael Peck, Special to The Inquirer
At 2:32 a.m. on a Saturday night last month, Diane Bedwell, a Gloucester Township police dispatcher, heard an abrupt radio call. "Get us some help," the voice said. Though the speaker gave neither his identity nor his location, Bedwell instantly recognized the voice as that of patrolman Sal Costa. She also knew that Costa had stopped a speeding car on Sicklerville Road just inside Winslow Township. Bedwell called in backup units to help Costa and a Winslow police officer subdue a drunken driver.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After months of riding through the streets and alleys of Phoenixville and studying borough maps, Chester County police dispatchers are now handling Phoenixville's emergency calls. That means that at any given hour, there is an additional police officer patrolling the borough, now that they are free from dispatching duty. "It's real, real nice," said Cpl. Georgeann Jordan, about the extra street coverage. The switch was made on New Year's Day, four months after the borough's four police dispatchers were laid off to help reduce the borough's deficit.
NEWS
January 13, 1988 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Representatives of Teamsters Local 676 told Westville's council members last night that the union had filed a labor grievance with the state's employment commission on behalf of the borough's four police dispatchers. The teamsters have picketed the borough hall since Monday after efforts to meet with borough officials failed, they said. Walter J. Bednarczyk, a business agent for the Teamsters, and attorney David A. Fox told council members they had filed a grievance Monday with the state's Public Employment Relations Commission alleging that the borough had failed to negotiate with the dispatchers.
NEWS
February 3, 2000 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Thomas Crawley isn't the only Philadelphian to torment 911 dispatchers. The beleaguered workers deal with a steady stream of pranksters while performing their daily duties. They each handle about 180 calls per eight-hour shift. Some are calling in fake crimes, like Crawley is accused of doing. Others try to use the emergency line as if it's a private delivery service. Deputy Police Commissioner Charles Brennan still recalls the woman who kept calling 911 during the blizzard several years ago. "She demanded that we send a cop out to buy her cigarettes," he said, laughing.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will lay off two of its three dispatchers to cut costs when it switches to the Camden County emergency dispatching service in May, Police Chief Charles Gooley Jr. confirmed yesterday. "Economics and liability pretty much forced us into it. . . . It's a service that the county was already doing," Gooley said. "County tax dollars were already providing for that. " Gooley said the switch would save the township more than $44,000 - $22,000 each for the two dispatchers' salaries, plus savings from not providing their benefits.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A union will appeal the layoffs of seven police dispatchers in Winslow Township, a union official said. The May 5 decision by the township committee will be appealed to the New Jersey Department of Personnel, said Richard M. Riggs, president of Camden County Council 10 of the New Jersey Civil Service Association. "We will appeal the good-faith aspects of the layoffs, whether they are doing this to save money," Riggs said. Michele McAdams, a dispatcher, was happy to hear of the appeal.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police officers in Chester County have been placed in compromising and sometimes life-threatening situations because some of Chester County's police radio dispatchers routinely mishandle calls, officials of the county Fraternal Order of Police charged last week. FOP president John R. Bailey, a Tredyffrin Township detective, said that during the last two years many police departments throughout the county have complained to the Department of Emergency Services, which operates the countywide police radio network, but have seen no improvement in the way calls are being handled.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The communications center, on Egg Harbor Road, handles requests for firefighters and EMS services for 37 county towns and police services for 32 towns, Keashen said. Other employees remained in the center and dispatchers returned to the building in about an hour, he said. The electrical problem in the server room occurred shortly before 1 p.m. and did not cause a fire, Keashen said. Employees went through a drill in March that simulated a similar scenario, he said. Contact Darran Simon at 856-779-3829 or dsimon@phillynews.com.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia police dispatcher was sentenced to 14 months in prison Tuesday for tipping off favored tow-truck operators to auto accidents in exchange for kickbacks. Dorian Parsley, 44, of Philadelphia, told U.S. District Judge Eduardo C. Robreno that through her crimes, she hurt "a lot of people. "What I did was wrong. . . . I have to pay for my actions. I'm sorry for what I did. " she said. In addition to the prison term, Parsley received one year of supervised release and a $1,000 fine.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
AT FIRST, Dorian Parsley shrugged. The former civilian police dispatcher seemed at a loss for words at her sentencing hearing before a federal judge. Then the words tumbled out. "I lost a lot of things," she said. "I continue to lose a lot of things. " She lost the trust of her daughter, mother and grandmother. She told the judge she took cash bribes from tow-truck operators in exchange for secretly texting them accident locations and driver information "because I needed to take care of my family.
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Unified Dispatch Unit is shoehorned into a nondescript office on the seventh floor of City Hall. With its stained drop-ceiling panels and fluorescent lighting, the office hardly looks controversial. Duct tape covers tears in the industrial-gray carpet. On one dingy buff-colored wall is a map of the city. On another is a poster: "Lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part. " Managing Director Richard Negrin describes it as the city's nerve center, a hub that allows Philadelphia's public servants to communicate with one another day or night.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Nittany Nation had been awaiting this day since Penn State boarded the charter flight last month for Ireland - a team that consistently could pound the ball on the ground and dominate the game. No one, however, loved seeing this offensive development more than the Nittany Lions players. "Whenever you can run the ball and physically impose your will on the defense, it's definitely good for the team," senior Bill Belton said Saturday, after scoring two of Penn State's five rushing touchdowns in a 48-7 romp over winless Massachusetts on a sun-splashed day at Beaver Stadium.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A HOT-BLOODED punk took major offense to a harmless accident, shooting another man several times outside a West Philly corner store Friday. Now, that victim - who police sources say is the husband of a department radio dispatcher - is fighting for his life at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Edward Lynn, 49, was shot six times outside A&A Deli, on Haverford Avenue near Farson, according to sources. Medics took him to the hospital, where he remained last night in critical but stable condition.
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soon, residents in the Pennsylvania suburbs will be able to reach 911 dispatchers by text message. Montgomery, Chester, Bucks, and Berks Counties agreed Thursday to jointly implement the new technology. Montgomery County officials, who are administering the regional effort, hope to have it up and running by early 2015. That will require new equipment and software and, more important, training dispatchers how to handle emergencies reported in 160 characters or less. "There are plenty of times when the person who needs assistance does not want to be overheard, when a telephone call is not a good idea," said Montgomery County Commissioner Bruce L. Castor Jr. "Talking is better, but we don't want to alert a bad guy, if somebody is hiding or whatever.
NEWS
August 7, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you call 911 from a mobile phone but do not know your exact location, a complex array of technologies is supposed to lend a hand, automatically transmitting a good estimate of your position to a dispatcher. But when a 14-year-old Philadelphia boy was drowning June 29 in Ocean City, N.J., an accurate electronic location showed up on dispatchers' screens for only two of the four calls seeking help, according to police data. The two callers pinpointed by the automated system were unsure where they were.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A FORMER Philadelphia police dispatcher and the co-owner of a Frankford auto-body shop pleaded guilty yesterday to participating in a bribery scheme involving the tow-trucking biz. Dorian Parsley, 44, the ex-dispatcher, admitted before U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno that she had taken cash bribes from tow-truck operators in exchange for giving them confidential police information about the locations of accident scenes. In a separate hearing before the judge, William Cheeseman, 43, co-owner of the K&B auto-body shop on Kinsey Street near Worth, pleaded guilty to one count of bribery.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THREE OF the four defendants in an alleged bribery scam involving a police dispatcher and three tow-truck operators pleaded not guilty at their arraignments in federal court yesterday. Dorian Parsley, 44, the civilian dispatcher who has since been suspended from the Police Department with intent to dismiss, declined to speak with a reporter afterward. William Cheeseman, 42, of Delran, N.J., an owner of K&B auto-body shop, a family business in Frankford, and Chad Harris, 22, of Philadelphia, a tow-truck operator who at times worked for K&B, also pleaded not guilty yesterday.
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