CollectionsDissertation
IN THE NEWS

Dissertation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
A Stanford University historian has charged that the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. extensively borrowed words and ideas from other sources for his doctoral dissertation and other writings without giving proper citations. "Several of King's academic papers, as well as his dissertation, contain numerous appropriated passages that can be defined as plagiarism," historian Clayborne Carson said, according to a story published yesterday in the Wall Street Journal. In 1984, Coretta Scott King, widow of the slain civil-rights leader, picked Carson to lead the Martin Luther King Jr. Papers Project, which is gathering the papers for publication in a multi-volume edition.
NEWS
July 20, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some earn doctorates by tinkering with a mathematical theorem. Some add a new interpretation to a 19th-century British novel. Some spend years on painstaking archaeological digs. Douglas Holt went to the ballpark. Specifically, Wrigley Field, home of the Chicago Cubs. That's where Holt, an assistant professor of marketing at Pennsylvania State University, researched his Ph.D. The research consisted of sitting in the stands for nearly 100 games, taking notes on how the fans acted.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
1. d. Thetford. 2. c. Corsets. 3. b. 1774. 4. a. Pennsylvania Magazine. 5. c. Bordentown City, N.J. 6. True, as early as 1775 in the essay "African Slavery in America. " 7. b. "Common Sense. " 8. c. "Rights of Man. " 9. d. "Dissertation on First Principles of Government. " 10. a. "The American Crisis. "
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS A "BUYER BEWARE" story that sounds made-up. I mean, who'd believe that buying a new house would lead to robbery and extortion? Yet there was Jordan Hyatt, driving through the city in the dead of night, taking text-message instructions from a contractor who'd robbed Hyatt and his wife. He'd return their stuff if they paid him $300. "It was surreal," says Hyatt, 34, a senior researcher in Penn's criminology department. Hyatt and his wife, Lindsay Wilde, 33, a physician, bought their just-built house in March 2012.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
LOS ANGELES - In the early 1970s, when Shifra Goldman proposed a doctoral dissertation on modern Mexican art, her professors at UCLA sneered. Compared with European art, the art of Latin America was, in their view, imitative, too political, unworthy of serious scholarly attention. But Goldman, a scrappy civil-rights and anti-Vietnam War activist who went back to school in her mid-30s, refused to consider a more mainstream topic. She waited until a more open-minded professor arrived to supervise her research.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Martin Luther King Jr. borrowed words and ideas extensively from other sources for his doctoral dissertation and other writings without giving proper citations, a Stanford University historian says. "Several of King's academic papers, as well as his dissertation, contain numerous appropriated passages that can be defined as plagiarism," historian Clayborne Carson said in a story The Wall Street Journal published today. The slain civil rights leader's wife, Coretta Scott King, chose Carson to lead The Martin Luther King Jr. Papers Project, which she founded in 1984 to gather his papers from locations around the country and produce a multi-volume collection.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
To mark the 275th anniversary of the birth of Revolutionary War pamphleteer Thomas Paine, answer these questions about his life and essays. 1. Where in England was Paine born? a. Lewes. b. London. c. Sandwich. d. Thetford. 2. For a time, Paine was a master stay-maker, with his own shop. What product did stay-makers produce? a. Anchors. b. Buttons. c. Corsets. d. Upholstery tacks. 3. When did he arrive in Philadelphia?
NEWS
March 9, 2005 | By Keith Forrest
We all have unfinished projects. They're a hallmark of any successful life. The only way you can truly stretch the bounds of who you are is to take on a few projects that seem impossible. But beware: A seemingly innocuous pile of documents can soon turn into a parchment beast. My wife, Kris, and I live in the den of two snarling paper creatures. There, sitting side by side in two semisymmetrical stacks on our bedroom floor, lies our unfinished testaments to being overeducated. Kris is haunted by her ponderings about a dead opera composer, some of the ingredients for her thesis in music history at West Chester University in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
CHICAGO SCIENTISTS THINK WE CAN LIVE AS LONG AS METHUSELAH Death may not be as sure as taxes after all. Biologists have found there may be virtually no inherent limit to the human life span and that there may someday be ways of dramatically increasing the length of life by techniques such as gene therapy. But they warned that practical applications are still a long way off. While the findings are controversial, the scientists reporting their work here at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science are convinced that their work with fruit flies, roundworms and mammals shows that what have been seen as natural limits to longevity are just the predictable result of evolutionary selection.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Reuters
Gary Owen Hughes came to Philadelphia seven years ago with pearl-like diction and the most golden of credentials: a doctorate from Oxford University and a dissertation that sparkled. But when editors for a massive Pennsylvania colonial history project read rough drafts he produced on the job, they were worried. The writing was nowhere as good as the thesis. They studied the essays more closely and drew an awful conclusion: Hughes' work was patched together from other sources - stolen goods.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal civil jury in Philadelphia on Thursday awarded a University of Pennsylvania doctoral candidate $80,000 for his 2011 arrest by city police while observing an Occupy Philadelphia protest for his dissertation. The U.S. District Court jury deliberated for about three hours before returning the verdict in favor of Gregory Harris and awarding him compensatory damages. The jury did not award punitive damages, said Lloyd Long 3d, who represented Harris with Elizabeth A. Hoffman in the 11/2-day trial before District Judge Cynthia M. Rufe.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS A "BUYER BEWARE" story that sounds made-up. I mean, who'd believe that buying a new house would lead to robbery and extortion? Yet there was Jordan Hyatt, driving through the city in the dead of night, taking text-message instructions from a contractor who'd robbed Hyatt and his wife. He'd return their stuff if they paid him $300. "It was surreal," says Hyatt, 34, a senior researcher in Penn's criminology department. Hyatt and his wife, Lindsay Wilde, 33, a physician, bought their just-built house in March 2012.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
By Brian Wright O'Connor Nearly 50 years after leaving the University of Pennsylvania for Vietnam, Lt. Col. Mortimer Lenane O'Connor will receive a posthumous Ph.D. today in a ceremony honoring academic achievement and sacrifice on the field of battle. My father, who set aside his dissertation to lead soldiers in war, will be included in the Class of 1968, the year he would most likely have completed his doctorate had fate not intervened. Born in 1930, my dad grew up in the company of soldier-storytellers on Army garrisons from Manila to the Old West, and watched his own father and three uncles set off for war in Europe.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
In her 80 years, Joan Myers Brown has been an artist, entrepreneur, and visionary, who with steely grace founded first, in 1960, a dance school for African American children and then, in 1970, Philadanco, where young dancers of color could find a performance home. It is now one of America's most important companies, and one of Philadelphia's most renowned touring exports. The challenge of relating Brown's life and accomplishments, of capturing her vitality, glamour and humanity, required someone her equal in beauty and wisdom.
NEWS
January 29, 2012
1. d. Thetford. 2. c. Corsets. 3. b. 1774. 4. a. Pennsylvania Magazine. 5. c. Bordentown City, N.J. 6. True, as early as 1775 in the essay "African Slavery in America. " 7. b. "Common Sense. " 8. c. "Rights of Man. " 9. d. "Dissertation on First Principles of Government. " 10. a. "The American Crisis. "
NEWS
January 29, 2012
To mark the 275th anniversary of the birth of Revolutionary War pamphleteer Thomas Paine, answer these questions about his life and essays. 1. Where in England was Paine born? a. Lewes. b. London. c. Sandwich. d. Thetford. 2. For a time, Paine was a master stay-maker, with his own shop. What product did stay-makers produce? a. Anchors. b. Buttons. c. Corsets. d. Upholstery tacks. 3. When did he arrive in Philadelphia?
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teresa Pica, 66, of Philadelphia, a professor in the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education and a leading expert in the field of second language acquisition, died Tuesday, Nov. 15, at home of complications from viral encephalitis. She had been ill since March after returning from a lecture abroad, said her sister, Anna Marie Goldberg. Dr. Pica's influence on the theory and practice of second language acquisition was groundbreaking, according to biographical material Penn made public.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
LOS ANGELES - In the early 1970s, when Shifra Goldman proposed a doctoral dissertation on modern Mexican art, her professors at UCLA sneered. Compared with European art, the art of Latin America was, in their view, imitative, too political, unworthy of serious scholarly attention. But Goldman, a scrappy civil-rights and anti-Vietnam War activist who went back to school in her mid-30s, refused to consider a more mainstream topic. She waited until a more open-minded professor arrived to supervise her research.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marilyn Auerbach Lashner, 80, of Center City, a media analyst and expert witness at trials involving First Amendment rights, died of cancer Tuesday, Aug. 24, at her home. In 1979, Dr. Lashner earned a doctorate in communications from Temple University. Five years later her dissertation, The Chilling Effect in TV News: Intimidation by the Nixon White House , was published as a book. For the dissertation, she compiled statements or actions by the Nixon administration that could have been interpreted as threats to the press, including Nixon's protest at a 1973 news conference of "outrageous, vicious, distorted reporting.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
THAT SOUND you heard was Mel Gibson falling off the cliff. And it was a mighty crash. I know some people think he'd already taken his tumble years ago when "The Passion of the Christ" enraged Jews, or his father denied the existence of the Holocaust, or he made racist and anti-Semitic comments during a DUI arrest or when he abandoned his longtime wife and the mother of his eight children for a Russian chick who'd apparently had a tragic encounter with...
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|