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Distance

NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
JAMES HARRIS is a man tormented. He dreams often of suffocating, choking as he wakes, unable to catch his breath. He keeps a knife tucked into his waistband almost always, a desperate defense against horrors he can easily imagine because he says he has lived them. He hesitates to get into anyone's car, unwilling to surrender control to the person behind the wheel. He has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and paranoia. Although five years have passed since the incident that changed his life, his torment doesn't end because his tormentor is still out there.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob McMurtrie was a smart, lanky kid with eyes for bigger places than Two Street, the hard-bitten pocket of South Philadelphia where he came from. At 22, McMurtrie set out on a journey of unfathomable distance in pursuit of glitter and riches. From Two Street, he traveled to Center City, where he got a job in 1964 as a clerk in a real estate office. He worked hard and kept his eye out for opportunities. By 1990, he'd stitched together a small empire. His assets were $29 million.
SPORTS
June 11, 1998 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Making the familiar trek from his Vineland home, following a route he has taken the last 12 summers, Asher Schwegel turns off Exit 14 of I-295 and heads west on Floodgate Road. As he navigates the final mile of his trip, across the railroad tracks, past the cornfields and whitewashed Cape Cods, a clearing on the right side of the road reveals his destination. On a 100-acre plot ringed by century-old trees sits Bridgeport Speedway, a clay racetrack five-eighths of a mile long. It's Saturday night, and there's no place Schwegel, 39, would rather be. Normally, he'd split his time between watching the races and serving as crew chief for his brother, Adam.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | By Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here at Holy Land U.S.A., there are no rides - unless you count the wagon and minibus tours. Farm animals in this theme park often outnumber daily visitors. There are no lines for exhibits, no costumed cicerones. No food concessions, fast or otherwise. "Bring 5 loaves and 2 fishes and have lunch by the Sea of Galilee," suggests the park's brochure. Finally, the playland as parable. Situated in southern Virginia amid the rolling foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains between Lynchburg and Roanoke, this 245-acre replica of ancient Israel is a fantasy land tucked far away from mall-to-mall America.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Lynn Vogel and Eugenia Iannone are two Bellmawr mothers who would like to have their children bused to school, but cannot. The Bellmawr Borough School District says that the distance between the two families' homes and the Bell Oaks middle school on Anderson Avenue, which their boys attend, is about 100 yards short of the 2-mile radius outside which children in the district can be bused. The women say the school district is wrong about the distance, and on Tuesday night they and their husbands asked the school board to remeasure the mileage between their homes in the 400 block of Roberts Avenue and the middle school.
SPORTS
November 23, 1996 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
When Ira Davis was a blazing world-class sprinter and triple jumper, he didn't look down on long distance runners. Davis, one of the greatest track athletes Philadelphia has produced, was impressed by their dedication. "I always admired them," Davis, a three-time Olympian from La Salle University and Overbrook High, said this week. "I said, 'I'd like to try that.' " Tomorrow, Davis will make his marathon debut as one of the more than 2,000 runners in the Philadelphia Marathon, which starts at the Art Museum at 8:30 a.m. "I promised myself I'd do it before I was 60," Davis said.
SPORTS
September 19, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The 27th running of the Jefferson Hospital Philadelphia Distance Run, called by some the best and fastest half-marathon in the United States, is scheduled to be held today, rain or shine, starting at 8 a.m. The starting line for the 13.1-mile race will be at 10th and Market Streets, and the finish line will be at Cherry Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The total prize money awarded will be $39,000, with the winners in the men's and women's division earning $7,000 each.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | By Tom Sheridan, Special to The Inquirer
The indoor track season is made up of weekly meets that more than one area coach said are as competitive as the District 1 outdoor meets in the spring. The competition, however, is conducted by the Track and Field Coaches Association of Philadelphia, not the PIAA, which means teams tend to consist of a couple of top athletes and a lot of underclassmen. The coaches use the indoor season to hone the skills of their best athletes and develop the skills of the underclassmen. This is a look at the area teams.
SPORTS
September 16, 1993 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
One of the top female runners in Sunday's 16th annual Philadelphia Distance Run we know about. Kim Jones, one of America's top distance runners was the first female finisher in the Distance Run two years ago and finished second twice in the Boston Marathon. The other runner, Caroline Schuwalow, is making her Philadelphia half- marathon debut. Schuwalow, from Melbourne, Australia, has been training in Atlanta to prepare for the humid conditions of the 1996 Summer Olympics.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1995 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Philadelphia Distance Run is one of the premiere races of its kind in the country, drawing some of the best runners from around the world, but it is also one of the most open and user-friendly road races around. Anyone can enter and run alongside the pros. That means anyone. From area die-hards, to total amateurs who just want to jog along for the heck of it, to corporate and club teams and even to the wheelchair-bound. Last year alone, the Run drew nearly 8,000 participants for the half- marathon's grueling 13.1 miles.
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