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Distance

SPORTS
September 12, 2013 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Staff Writer
THE SEASON is one game old, yet the sales job seems to be over. Chip Kelly has made the case that his product is worthwhile. He has made this to the Washington Redskins. He has made this to the National Football League. He has made this to the remaining wary Eagles fans and analysts, many who believed from his hire through the dog days of this summer that the frantic pace of his offense would sabotage his own team as much as it would the opponent. "When you're wrong, you're wrong," Washington cornerback DeAngelo Hall said after Monday night's 33-27 loss to the Eagles.
NEWS
January 27, 2012 | By Buzz Bissinger, For the Daily News
JOE PATERNO's death is no more or less tragic than any other death. All dying is sorrow. People should remember Paterno any way they choose, with prayers or love or tears or, yes, continued anger. We shouldn't forget the former Penn State football coach's highlights, but we shouldn't turn him into a martyr either. He should not be made into a victim because of the circumstances of his dismissal by the university board of trustees on Nov. 9. He should be remembered for what he did, his success as a football coach on the field in which he won 409 games, the most in history; his far more impressive record off the field, in which, according to a recent study, 80 percent of his players graduated within six years; his multimillion-dollar donation to the Penn State library system; his undying love for the school.
LIVING
September 25, 1996 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News and Star
Clint Eastwood flinched first and settled a lawsuit yesterday with ex-live-in Sondra Locke minutes before a jury was to render a verdict in her favor. Neither side was talking how much, but her lawyer said it was a straight cash deal with no future considerations. Locke had sought $2.5 mil for Eastwood's alleged sabotaging of her directing career. A juror said damages were discussed from $15,000 to $10 mil. The lawsuit was over a movie deal he supposedly brokered for her at Warner Bros.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | By Richard Sine, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Though Mary Coe is president of Friends of Radnor Trails, she had never hiked Skunk Hollow until last month. She said it reminded her of her childhood exploring the woods near her home at the foot of the Catskills. "I felt I was 9 years old again, catching pollywogs and skipping across streams. " With a little bit of work, Coe said, new generations of children could be exploring Skunk Hollow, their imaginations turning old stone walls into medieval fortresses. But to those Radnor residents who have heard of Skunk Hollow, a sylvan paradise is not necessarily the first image that comes to mind.
NEWS
April 18, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bob McMurtrie was a smart, lanky kid with eyes for bigger places than Two Street, the hard-bitten pocket of South Philadelphia where he came from. At 22, McMurtrie set out on a journey of unfathomable distance in pursuit of glitter and riches. From Two Street, he traveled to Center City, where he got a job in 1964 as a clerk in a real estate office. He worked hard and kept his eye out for opportunities. By 1990, he'd stitched together a small empire. His assets were $29 million.
SPORTS
June 11, 1998 | By Pete Schnatz, FOR THE INQUIRER
Making the familiar trek from his Vineland home, following a route he has taken the last 12 summers, Asher Schwegel turns off Exit 14 of I-295 and heads west on Floodgate Road. As he navigates the final mile of his trip, across the railroad tracks, past the cornfields and whitewashed Cape Cods, a clearing on the right side of the road reveals his destination. On a 100-acre plot ringed by century-old trees sits Bridgeport Speedway, a clay racetrack five-eighths of a mile long. It's Saturday night, and there's no place Schwegel, 39, would rather be. Normally, he'd split his time between watching the races and serving as crew chief for his brother, Adam.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Kenneth Glick, Special to The Inquirer
Mary Lynn Vogel and Eugenia Iannone are two Bellmawr mothers who would like to have their children bused to school, but cannot. The Bellmawr Borough School District says that the distance between the two families' homes and the Bell Oaks middle school on Anderson Avenue, which their boys attend, is about 100 yards short of the 2-mile radius outside which children in the district can be bused. The women say the school district is wrong about the distance, and on Tuesday night they and their husbands asked the school board to remeasure the mileage between their homes in the 400 block of Roberts Avenue and the middle school.
SPORTS
November 23, 1996 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
When Ira Davis was a blazing world-class sprinter and triple jumper, he didn't look down on long distance runners. Davis, one of the greatest track athletes Philadelphia has produced, was impressed by their dedication. "I always admired them," Davis, a three-time Olympian from La Salle University and Overbrook High, said this week. "I said, 'I'd like to try that.' " Tomorrow, Davis will make his marathon debut as one of the more than 2,000 runners in the Philadelphia Marathon, which starts at the Art Museum at 8:30 a.m. "I promised myself I'd do it before I was 60," Davis said.
SPORTS
September 19, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The 27th running of the Jefferson Hospital Philadelphia Distance Run, called by some the best and fastest half-marathon in the United States, is scheduled to be held today, rain or shine, starting at 8 a.m. The starting line for the 13.1-mile race will be at 10th and Market Streets, and the finish line will be at Cherry Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The total prize money awarded will be $39,000, with the winners in the men's and women's division earning $7,000 each.
SPORTS
November 23, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like all of us, Gene had many faults. But the greatest of those may have been devotion. When my closest high school buddy and college roommate found something he liked, he didn't embrace it. He snatched it with bulldog jaws and, whether good or bad, refused to let go. We were Cardinal O'Hara freshmen when we latched onto the school's basketball team. If the two of us missed a single game in four high school years, I don't recall it. We hitchhiked to games, took buses and subways, bummed rides with players' parents.
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