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Distress

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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mark Ludak
Dwayne Cliett is comforted by his neighbor, Alberta Sanders, as fire destroys his home on 52nd Street near Springfield Avenue. The two-alarm blaze got under way at 11:56 a.m. yesterday, and was brought under control an hour later. Two firefighters suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
August 27, 1986
Recently my husband and I were driving on Bustleton Avenue, and as we passed the area around Fox Chase Street, my husband exclaimed, "Did you see the sign on the bus?" It said, "Help. Call Police. " There was also a flashing light on top of the bus. We made a turn and tried to catch up to the bus. When it stopped to discharge a passenger, we were able to get in front of the bus and acknowledge to the driver that we had seen his distress signal and would go for help. At that point a police car drove up, and it was no longer necessary for us to be involved.
NEWS
February 28, 1986 | By William W. Sutton Jr. and Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writers
The American flag outside the home of A. Danielle Rousseau still flies in the distress mode - upside down - but a big step toward righting the banner was taken in City Council yesterday. Councilman Lucien E. Blackwell introduced a bill that would pay Rousseau $100,000 for the faulty renovation of her home that she has blamed on the city and over which she has flipped her flag. A flag flown upside down is a recognized distress signal. And Rousseau and her husband, Jerome Hunter, have been displaying the stars and stripes that way outside their house, in the 4800 block of Chester Avenue, since Jan. 20. They contend that, through a city-administered program, an inept city- approved general contractor five years ago did work on their Southwest Philadelphia home that resulted in problems that have cost $170,000 to correct.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | By Carol Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Willingboro Township Council members told a county planning commission representative last night that their suburban community of 38,000 residents remains vibrant and financially healthy, despite the state's decision to label it one of New Jersey's most "distressed" cities. The council vowed early this month to fight the State Planning Commission's report that placed Willingboro in Tier I, the worst category of its seven-tier ranking for identifying statewide development needs.
NEWS
September 27, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
T HE SADNESS in Obie Batchelor's heart is older than America itself, he said, a bittersweet reminder of all American Indians displaced or slowly stripped of their culture over the centuries. But in 2010, there's no army marching toward the Rankokus Indian Reservation in Burlington County to force the Powhatan Renape Nation off the land there. These days, change comes in the form of code violations, the tribe's own fiscal and personal problems, and a disconnect between a businesslike state government and what Batchelor calls the "Native mind.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Distress, said Danielle Rousseau and Jerome Hunter, summed up their feelings as well as any other word. After spending $170,000 to repair damage allegedly done to their Southwest Philadelphia house by a contractor, after losing two lawsuits and having city officials shut doors in their faces for more than six years, Rousseau and Hunter say they are exhausted, angry - and, yes, distressed. So two weeks ago, at the suggestion of the commander of Jerome's American Legion post in Germantown, the couple hung an American flag upside down outside the old Victorian home they share at 48th Street and Chester Avenue.
NEWS
January 6, 1986 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
Windowless and small, the basement office in Cherry Hill somehow resembles a remote weather station, an impression enhanced by logbooks filled with daily entries from South Jersey's emotional hurricane watch. Christmas Eve, 1985. 11:50 p.m. A 27-year-old man has telephoned to say he is in a room filled with friends. All are drunk. Ear-piercing screams fill the background. "He wanted to know what to do," reads Rosemary Bridgeman, director of Ala-Call, a 24-hour hotline for people with alcohol-related problems.
SPORTS
March 18, 1996 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Things are starting to heat up under the circus tent that is the Chicago Bulls traveling show. As the Bulls arrive to play the 76ers at 7:30 tonight at the Spectrum, they are in the most disarray they have been in this season, which is to say not much. Of course, any disarray would pale when compared with that of the Sixers, who are 13-51. But for the Bulls, who have been running with absolute precision this season while winning 57 games, the slightest distress is news. Scottie Pippen, who is averaging 20.7 points per game, is injured and is not expected to make the trip from Chicago.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
The Coast Guard is offering a $3,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and prosecution of whoever made a fake distress call reporting an explosion and sinking of a yacht off the New Jersey coast. The call Monday claimed there had been an blast aboard the yacht Blind Date and that 21 people aboard, including seven who had been injured, had taken to life rafts off Sandy Hook. The Coast Guard said a later call reported that three people had died. The Coast Guard joined by law enforcement marine units launched a major search and rescue operation, but officials later determined the call was a hoax when they spotted no wreckage.
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | Steven Rea
Somebody showed Greta Gerwig an early review of Damsels in Distress, the new Whit Stillman lark in which she stars — and in which she leads an ersatz Hollywood musical dance number — and the actress was not happy. "I really love musicals, and I was thrilled that I got to take part in a song-and-dance number," explains Gerwig. "But I actually was upset — it said that no one was very good at dancing or singing, and I was like, well, I think I'm good. I wasn't given a chance to really do it. I got defensive — criticizing my tap dancing and singing!
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NEWS
November 10, 2015
The Coast Guard said Sunday evening it was still searching for a vessel in distress off the Jersey Shore near Ocean City. The Coast Guard said it received a mayday call on VHF marine radio channel 16 at approximately 12:45 p.m. Sunday from the fishing vessel Interlude, stating the vessel was taking on water and heading into port. A Coast Guard helicopter and a cutter were dispatched from bases in or near Atlantic City to look for the fishing boat. The Coast Guard asked that anyone with any information regarding the search call Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay at 215-271-4940 or on VHF marine radio channel 16. - David Sell  
REAL_ESTATE
September 20, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Many parts of the Philadelphia region continue to struggle with distressed-home inventory. South Jersey, especially, is mired in short sales and foreclosures - the product of a logjam of several years in the legal system. A short sale occurs when the lender agrees to accept less from the seller/borrower than the balance of the mortgage. From what I have seen in my own neighborhood, lenders continue to drag their feet getting these houses from foreclosure to the resale market, often with devastating results.
NEWS
May 31, 2015 | By Katherine Dahlsgaard, For The Inquirer
The cutest boy in the world bounded into my office, followed by his parents, who were not happy. They described their son as a "very poor eater" since age 2. Now 6, "getting him to eat is a constant battle," and his parents worried they were losing the war. At mealtimes, he ran from the table, often screaming. When they managed to get him to sit, he often refused to swallow, or would spit food out, or gagged as it went down. By the time he was brought to me for a psychological evaluation, there were no clear medical issues that explained his food avoidance, nor were there mechanical problems with regard to feeding himself: The boy was perfectly capable of holding silverware and bringing food to his mouth; he mostly just preferred not to. At home, there were a few foods he would consume without complaint, and he ate those on permanent repeat.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deeply in debt, its tax base depleted, and its government in turmoil, tiny Colwyn Borough was declared "financially distressed" Wednesday by the state in an attempt to remedy the town's financial disarray. The tiny Delaware County borough - a third of a square mile, 2,500 residents - that borders Philadelphia entered the state's Act 47 program, a last-resort option for struggling municipalities that need help developing a financial-recovery plan. The decision by Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin represents a step toward recovery for Colwyn, which has a $1.2 million debt that includes outstanding bills, pension payments, and reimbursements to the state.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police came to the rescue twice in less than an hour in downtown Camden on Thursday. They removed a baby locked alone and in distress in a hot car, and less than an hour later, with Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson lending a hand, revived a man from a drug overdose. Officer Belinda Villegas-Ramos was working a security detail at a TD Bank office on Mickle Boulevard shortly before noon when a passerby told her a baby was crying in a car parked outside a nearby CVS pharmacy.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the staff at Abington Memorial Hospital handed the breast cancer patient its new "Distress Thermometer" questionnaire, she instantly felt conflicted. How could she, an early-stage patient with a good prognosis, say how she was really feeling when she saw how much worse off others in the radiation-treatment waiting room were? She left it blank. A week later, the staff asked again. Come January, cancer programs that want accreditation from the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer will be required to formally ask all cancer patients about their psychosocial needs.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Glenn E. Straub, a South Florida investor, emerged from nowhere this week with his $90 million cash bid for Atlantic City's bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel. But for the last 20 years, Straub, 67, has made it his business to buy distressed properties - including a polo club, massive yachts, and even a high-end development in Port St. Lucie, Fla., that was left for dead by Philadelphia's Lubert-Adler real estate firm. Straub was circumspect about what he would do with the Revel property if his bid turns out to be the winner in an auction scheduled for Sept.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
  MILLBOURNE Twenty-one years after Millbourne was placed on the official state list of fiscally troubled communities, Gov. Corbett traveled to the tiny Delaware County borough Thursday afternoon to announce the end of its "financially distressed" status. Millbourne, with about 1,200 residents, had been under Act 47 since 1993, which made it eligible for state grants and assistance. Mayor Thomas Kramer said the borough had not overspent its budget for the last five years and had taken aggressive steps to cut costs - even enlisting goats to clear weeds.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
The Royal Caribbean cruise ship that set sail from a New Jersey port over the weekend may be the most spotless craft plying the waves - having undergone a top-to-bottom scrubbing after a stomach bug sickened nearly 700 passengers and crew, cutting short the ship's previous Caribbean getaway. The general consensus was that Royal Caribbean moved aggressively to contain the nasty outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea, and the cruise line pledged that there wouldn't be a recurrence. But the Explorer of the Seas' voyage was one of several ill-fated recent cruises.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry Costo was only 20 when he was sent to his first fatal fire. He raced up to a third-floor apartment on Girard Avenue, where a teenage girl was reportedly trapped. He grabbed her feet, pulled her dead body closer, and realized something was wrong. There were too many limbs. Costo turned to his partner to share what he had found: two girls, hugging each other, realizing they would die. But driving back home, Costo didn't feel a thing. "I remember thinking, 'There must be something wrong with me. Am I that hardened?
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