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District Lines

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NEWS
June 29, 2006 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Supreme Court yesterday upheld most of a controversial plan that drew new lines for Texas congressional districts, saying that nothing about it violated the Constitution. Texas Republicans had redrawn the map mid-decade and in ways that gave their party a large electoral advantage. The 7-2 decision cleared the way for states to redraw political maps just about any time they want to. It also failed, as the court has for years, to set legal limits on political gerrymandering, the drawing of district lines for partisan ends.
NEWS
December 7, 2009
LAST MONTH, Rep. John Perzel was charged with 82 counts of fraud, conspiracy, and theft for his illegal use of tax dollars for political activity. However, his real power play - manipulating the redistricting process to protect himself - was completely legal. In 2000, Perzel experienced something rare for an incumbent politician: he almost lost. Two years later, he won by more than 14,000 votes. His trick was not winning over the voters who had supported his opponent, but something much simpler: He redrew his legislative district to include more registered Republicans.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
A Latino advocacy group filed suit Thursday to prevent Pennsylvania state district maps drawn in 2001 from being used in the next election. "The 2001 legislative district lines do not reflect the demographic changes that have occurred in the last 10 years," said Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of LatinoJustice PRLDEF, which filed the lawsuit. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court voted, 4-3, last week to reject proposed district lines approved by a bipartisan legislative commission.
NEWS
January 25, 1986 | By Alison Carper, Special to The Inquirer
Last year, as Senate Minority Whip John H. Arnold was about to settle on a new house in suburban Wilmington, his Republican colleagues were pushing legislation that extended the boundaries of his district to include the new home. Just how much of a coincidence this was has been a matter of debate since the bill became widely publicized last summer. But the controversy has been revived in the legislature this year, and Democrats say it could end with an unanticipated result.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Montgomery County Commissioners Chairman Josh Shapiro, a Democrat, and seven other local plaintiffs filed an appeal Monday opposing the state's latest Republican-drawn redistricting plan. The most recent maps - released June 8 - would divide Montgomery County into eight Senate and 19 House districts, none of which lies entirely within the county, and cut district lines through several townships and boroughs. The plaintiffs called the plan "overtly political" and argued that it violates a state constitutional mandate to keep counties and cities together in one representative district "unless absolutely necessary.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey Chief Justice Stuart Rabner on Thursday appointed Rutgers University political scientist Alan Rosenthal as the tiebreaking member of the Apportionment Commission, which is remapping the state's 40 legislative districts. The commission's five Republican and five Democratic members said they could not make a deal on where to draw district lines. Once they declared an impasse, Rabner was able to name Rosenthal, whose involvement both sides agreed to months ago. Rosenthal must come up with the new districts by April 3, before candidates' filing deadlines in the June 7 primary for all 120 legislative seats.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Once again turning their backs on voters, Pennsylvania lawmakers are ramming through a new map of congressional districts that stretches boundaries and splits communities to protect incumbents. The legislature never gave voters a credible chance to have real input into who will represent them. Voters wouldn't have been so marginalized were there a genuine bipartisan process that required their participation. The most disjointed district protects freshman U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.)
NEWS
April 17, 2011
Maybe they should change the name for gerrymandering - the practice by which politicians carve out districts to help incumbents get reelected - to phillymandering. Most history books trace the schemes to 1812, when Massachusetts Gov. Elbridge Gerry signed a law creating a district that looked like a salamander. However, Azavea, a software company that analyzes voting districts, noted in a 2010 study that Pennsylvania provided an even earlier example - in 1709, when politicians in Bucks, Chester, and then-separate Philadelphia County conspired to draw legislative districts that stole representation from the city of Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
Philadelphia City Council, which has been in the hot-tempered throes of redrawing the map that determines Council districts, is closing in on a compromise that makes sense. The latest proposed map, which would replace one successfully vetoed by Mayor Street in his never-ending war of wills with Council, will include more Latino residents in the Seventh District, which snakes from Kensington into the Lower Northeast. This map shows a recognition of the city's growing Latino population and the need to make sure its views and needs are represented on City Council.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 8, 2014 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suburban voters won't have any say in State Rep. Brendan Boyle's reelection bid this year - new legislative boundaries took a sliver of Montgomery County away from his Northeast Philadelphia district. So why did Boyle's reelection campaign fund donate to Montgomery County Democratic groups last year? As it happens, Boyle is running for Congress there. Boyle is seeking his party's nomination to succeed fellow Democrat Allyson Y. Schwartz, who is giving up her seat in Congress to run for governor.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a once-a-decade redrawing of the city's 10 Council districts, tradition has held that members could begin providing services to voters in their new areas even before the changes go into effect. That's why Councilman Brian J. O'Neill didn't think his proposal to enshrine that tradition into Council rules last month was that big of a deal. "There's absolutely nothing changing that hasn't been going on for 30 years," said O'Neill, a councilman since 1980. "To me, it's a commonsense no-brainer.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Montgomery County Commissioners Chairman Josh Shapiro, a Democrat, and seven other local plaintiffs filed an appeal Monday opposing the state's latest Republican-drawn redistricting plan. The most recent maps - released June 8 - would divide Montgomery County into eight Senate and 19 House districts, none of which lies entirely within the county, and cut district lines through several townships and boroughs. The plaintiffs called the plan "overtly political" and argued that it violates a state constitutional mandate to keep counties and cities together in one representative district "unless absolutely necessary.
NEWS
February 3, 2012
A Latino advocacy group filed suit Thursday to prevent Pennsylvania state district maps drawn in 2001 from being used in the next election. "The 2001 legislative district lines do not reflect the demographic changes that have occurred in the last 10 years," said Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of LatinoJustice PRLDEF, which filed the lawsuit. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court voted, 4-3, last week to reject proposed district lines approved by a bipartisan legislative commission.
NEWS
January 27, 2012
DO YOU LIVE in Northeast Philadelphia and feel the call to public service? Are you willing to potentially relocate to York County? Then the 169th state House District has an opportunity for you! New City Councilman Denny O'Brien , who left the 169th District seat this month when he moved to City Hall, was ticked off about what happened with his old district last month. The Legislative Reapportionment Commission, tasked with redrawing the lines of state House and Senate districts every 10 years, moved the seat from Northeast Philly to York County.
NEWS
January 27, 2012
THE Pennsylvania Supreme Court has yet to explain its surprising ruling that overturns the state legislative redistricting plan created last month that had faced 11 formal challenges. The ruling is good news. It would be even better if the court's explanation of the ruling addresses the inherent flaws in the redistricting process - flaws which, as voters who witnessed the city's recent councilmanic redistricting process know - are not limited to the state. The challenges to the state's map included allegations that the map - required every 10 years following the census - is too politically partisan, and is designed to benefit Republicans.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Once again turning their backs on voters, Pennsylvania lawmakers are ramming through a new map of congressional districts that stretches boundaries and splits communities to protect incumbents. The legislature never gave voters a credible chance to have real input into who will represent them. Voters wouldn't have been so marginalized were there a genuine bipartisan process that required their participation. The most disjointed district protects freshman U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.)
NEWS
November 1, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Cyclist hurt in Fishtown A 62-year-old man was taken to Hahnemann University Hospital yesterday afternoon after he rode his bicycle into telecommunications wires that were drooping after a truck knocked them down. The accident occurred about 3 p.m. on Delaware Avenue near Richmond Street, in Fishtown. Medics said the man, who was thrown from his bike when he rode into the wires, was injured but not seriously. Apply now for heat help Funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
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