CollectionsDistrust
IN THE NEWS

Distrust

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 19, 1997
A major lesson from the acquittal of the two punks charged with the murder of Kimberly Ernest is even more chilling than the fact that the killer presumably is still at large. Defects in the prosecution's case aside, the verdict poses another example of the nationwide crisis of confidence in those entrusted to protect the public and make our communities safe: the police. At one time, a confession was enough to convict. No longer. When a smart defense lawyer injects even slight suspicion in jurors' minds that the cops coerced the confession, unless there is substantive physical evidence, that shadow of doubt often springs a defendant.
NEWS
July 3, 2002
In the last 10 months, we've become more accustomed to seeing firefighters as heroes. Now, how "gut-wrenching," as one official put it, to see two of them - a Forest Service worker and an Arizona contract firefighter - accused of igniting two of the summer's largest, most damaging Western wildfires. . . . In recent times, Americans also have seen the occasional nurse who murdered patients; too many priests who violated their calling; greedy corporate chieftains who lied, bilked companies and hid their doings; accountant watchdogs who became lap dogs . . . stock advisors with financial conflicts.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | By Scott Holleran
Last Friday, a five-member jury cleared the federal government of liability in a wrongful death suit arising from the 1993 Waco disaster. A disaster it was: armed gunmen; tanks; the infamous black helicopters. Eighty-three people dead in the conflagration, including Branch Davidian leader David Koresh. These symbols prompted many to point to Waco as the ultimate symbol of government interference in private lives. To them, government was a conspiracy of the powerful. Timothy McVeigh bombed the Oklahoma City Federal Building on the second anniversary of the Waco disaster, killing hundreds.
NEWS
June 16, 2002
From great distrust sprang great distrust. That, fellow Americans, is the operative statement. Thirty years ago tomorrow, five men broke into the Democratic National Committee's headquarters at the Watergate hotel and office complex in Washington. Their mission: to gather information for President Richard M. Nixon's 1972 reelection campaign. The outcome: a drama of people; pettiness; politics; payback; and the resignation of an American president. The legacy of the scandal known simply as Watergate is as sprawling as the country itself.
NEWS
March 4, 2007 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's mayoral candidates face a populace distrustful of city government, dissatisfied with public schools, and remarkably ignorant about the candidates in the May 15 primary election. According to a poll released yesterday by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia, residents are contemptuous of city government and sour on Mayor Street, who is barred from seeking reelection this year after serving two terms. Seventy-six percent said city government was "pretty much run by a few big interests looking out for themselves.
NEWS
October 16, 1994 | By Steven Thomma and R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU David Hess of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
One thing is certain about next month's congressional elections: Some of those who win will soon be losers. They will become members of Congress, the institution Americans love to hate. After the cheers of election night fade, they will be accused of hiding behind the tinted glass of limousines, of selling their votes to the highest bidder, of quickly losing touch. A few probably will be guilty. Far more will be stained by the mud falling on all those who enter the marbled halls of the Capitol.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
The president of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, Nicholas DeBenedictis, urges Philadelphia to adopt Mayor Goode's trash incineration plan (Op-ed Page, Jan. 23). He should realize that his support increases people's opposition. The opposition to Mayor Goode's plan is based in large measure on people's distrust of government agencies' ability or willingness to properly enforce environmental protection laws against industry and government polluters. That distrust is based on hard experiences throughout our city, our state and our nation.
NEWS
April 5, 1986
At the risk of sounding like another one of those damned blame-America- firsters, I feel constrained to speak in opposition to the President's proposed $100 million contra aid package. I am aware that the Sandinistas have become increasingly radical in the past few years, and I am aware of their blemished human-rights record. I believe, however, that their growing radicalism can be ascribed to our policies, and, lest we judge them too quickly or too harshly on human rights, we should recall U.S. treatment of Japanese Americans at a time we perceived ourselves to be under siege.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grace Flisser teaches English 101 - freshman composition - at the Community College of Philadelphia. But some days, her classroom seems more of a cauldron of hostility and resistance than anything else. And before she can even get to the topic of writing, she told a group of teachers yesterday, she finds she must repeatedly confront distrust in her students - distrust of her, distrust of other students and distrust of education. "I see education as transformation," Flisser said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Solomon Jones
LAST WEEK, a federal jury awarded $34,000 to developer Ori Feibush, who said that Councilman Kenyatta Johnson blocked Feibush's purchase of two parcels of land in the South Philadelphia area Johnson represents. Though Johnson cleared the way for Feibush to purchase six other pieces of land, Feibush claimed Johnson blocked his purchase of the two parcels for political reasons. The court agreed, and Johnson says the ruling will be appealed. But the ruling was about more than a fight between Johnson, a sitting councilman, and Feibush, a candidate who unsuccessfully ran against him. The ruling was about crippling councilmanic prerogative, a City Council tradition that gives District members of Council such as Johnson veto power over land use in their districts.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
The courtroom drama that began playing out this week in Pittsburgh provides the perfect, though troubling, backdrop for a renewed push to reform how Pennsylvania's top judges are chosen. If any case were a primer on the need to remove the state's appellate courts from the hurly-burly of partisan elections, the corruption trial of a suspended Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice just tops the bill. Allegheny County prosecutors contend that Joan Orie Melvin, while serving as a lower appellate court judge, used her taxpayer-paid staff to campaign for her Supreme Court seat in both 2003 and 2009.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
By Jennifer Donahue President Obama and Mitt Romney have made their cases to the American public through grueling daily campaign events, three televised debates, and the conventions. The result is a tie, and voters on the left and right won't break it. That will fall to a small group of people who don't vote regularly, but will be moved to head to the polls next week. This race will likely be decided by a fence-sitting 5 percent of the electorate in just nine swing states. The key to these undecided voters' late-breaking decisions - and the election - won't be the campaign promises the candidates have made.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Roy Maynard
As the presidential campaign heats up, we should look closely at a faraway object for a lesson about polls. Billions of miles away from us, Pluto spins happily around the sun, ignoring all polls and surveys. We would be wise to adopt its attitude. In 2006, a poll of pocket-protector-wearing, hungover, disco-bobulated astronomers determined that Pluto wasn't a planet after all. (Officially, we now have only eight planets in the solar system; Pluto was sent to the kiddies' table.)
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Nancy A. Youssef, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - As violence continued Monday in Afghanistan over the accidental burning of Qurans by U.S. troops last week, American military officials and analysts are beginning to question whether the United States needs to change its mission of training Afghan soldiers and police, a key plank of President Obama's withdrawal strategy. White House and Pentagon officials said publicly that they weren't yet contemplating a major overhaul of the plan to build a force of more than 300,000 Afghan soldiers and police officers and hand over security of the country to it by 2014 or earlier.
NEWS
January 29, 2012 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cramer Hill hasn't changed much in the six years since federal authorities say former State Sen. Wayne Bryant used the Camden neighborhood's hopes to line his own pockets. The community of about 10,000 residents that was promised an urban renaissance is still plagued by abandoned buildings, vacant lots, and high unemployment. It's a familiar story in many U.S. cities. Bryant's alleged role in that story, to be detailed in a corruption trial set to begin Tuesday in federal court in Trenton, also is familiar: Politics and power often trump the public good.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Two days of fierce street battles between security forces and protesters in Cairo show just how volatile Egypt remains nearly five months after the popular uprising that ousted authoritarian leader Hosni Mubarak. More than 1,000 were hurt in the unrest Tuesday and Wednesday, driven by discontent over the slow pace of justice for old regime figures accused of corruption and of killing protesters. There were an estimated 6,000 protesters at the peak of the riots late Tuesday. The clashes in Tahrir Square, the worst since the 18-day uprising, add a new layer to an already painful and chaotic transition from Mubarak's regime to democratic rule under the supervision of the military.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The disclosure that Villanova University's law school altered admissions data that figure prominently in national rankings occurs amid ongoing concern that the rankings offer both a false picture of educational quality and create incentives to manipulate grades and test scores. The nation's most prominent rating service, U.S. News & World Report, for years has been the focus of scorn among college and university administrators who say that at best it gives an inadequate picture of educational quality.
NEWS
April 9, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last time 38-year-old Chandra Gurung was counted in a national census was in Bhutan in 1991, and it led to the expulsion of more than 105,000 Bhutanese of Nepali descent. Authorities "wanted to know if your parents and grandparents were born in Bhutan," she recalled. "If they weren't, you were forced to leave. " Gurung said that she had met the parentage requirement but that her husband's family had not. She moved with him and his family to one of seven United Nations-run resettlement camps outside Bhutan, a small kingdom between India and China.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Mayor Nutter's promise of a "new day" in residential and commercial developers' often-frustrating and contentious dealings with city government appears to have given them hope that doing business with Philadelphia may get easier. Yet, despite assurances by city officials at a panel yesterday that changes are coming, a veteran of 30 years of development battles warned that change would not come if the average Philadelphian continues to distrust the development decision-making process.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|