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Diversity

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NEWS
June 4, 2007
TO LETTER-writer Todd Cohen: I hear your complaints about your new minority neighbors. As an American of African descent, I truly understand, crystal clearly, your feelings and experience. However, the people that I suggested to move into communities, such as the Northeast, to cure the "white-flightitis" are the ones with a mentality like Tiger Woods, Larry Elder, Michael Nutter, the late Fred Rogers, Mother Teresa, and even syndicated radio host Delilah. These individuals would respect the properties, neighbors (like you and I)
NEWS
August 2, 2007 | By CHARISSE LILLIE
PHILADELPHIA is known for many things - birthplace of our country's independence, home of the Liberty Bell, world-famous cheesesteaks, to name a few. But what doesn't get as much attention are the great things corporations are doing in Center City to help build a future for our youth. Yesterday, Comcast hosted over 60 minority students from all backgrounds and walks of life. Some are working at our headquarters in Center City this summer, others in regional internship programs funded by Comcast.
SPORTS
January 10, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Temple is one of 10 Division I-A institutions to earn the overall excellence in diversity award bestowed by the Laboratory for Diversity in Sport at Texas A&M University, Temple officials announced yesterday. The award recognizes the NCAA Division I-A athletic departments that excel in diversity. "I am extremely pleased that the Temple athletics department has received this recognition," Bill Bradshaw, Temple's director of athletics, said in a statement. "This is an area that Temple University takes pride in, not just in athletics, but in all areas of the university.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
ANYONE who reads Michelle Malkin's diatribe regarding diversity in the media and does not conclude that she is as crazy as a loon is in the same boat as she is. Her media-diversity test exposes her as an intellectual lightweight. Her list of 20 questions to determine your cultural and ideological viewpoint on diversity does nothing more than stereotype the people she is trying to elevate. Ms. Malkin tries to position herself as the arbiter of all things "diverse. " Yet her column seem to be excluding her from participating in her chosen profession.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
Diversity should not be a factor in admissions Diversity is being distinct or unlike others; it is having variety in form. Diversity is a difference and variation in the population. Typically, when people think of what makes a body diverse, they think of having people of different races, genders, ethnicities and religions. Colleges and universities often strive to create environments that encompass such a student body. In my college experience, I have seen a moderate amount of diversity.
NEWS
January 21, 2005 | By Richard L. McCormick
In his op-ed piece ("Rutgers hire is a shill for race-based admissions," Jan. 12), lawyer Greg Sullivan criticized Rutgers University's appointment of Jonathan Alger as general counsel on the basis that Alger played a prominent role in defending the University of Michigan's admissions policies in the Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger cases. I will not and need not defend Rutgers' hiring of Alger, an immensely talented lawyer nationally recognized for his expertise on a wide range of issues important to higher education, including academic freedom, intellectual property, media rights and distance education.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By RICHARD HARWOOD
The agenda of the American newspaper ordinarily is obvious enough to its readers, consisting of such conventional stuff as crime, politics, gossip, the price of eggs and the foreign policy crisis of the week. Internally, however, our larger newspapers are preoccupied these days with something else: race and the "diversity" of their labor force. For years we were in the hypocritical position of promoting civil rights, equal opportunity, racial integration and the women's movement in all walks of life except our own. As recently as 1978, when Mississippi classrooms were fully integrated, our newsrooms were 96 percent white.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
So, you might wonder in the wake of the Dad Vail Regatta flap, do other city-supported special events have to worry about their ethnic or racial make up? Will the Greek Picnic, a gathering of African-American fraternity students, or the Steuben Day Parade have to show diversity to get a permit? Nope, at least not yet. "We don't exclude anybody from the process," said Acting Managing Director Joe Certaine, "whether they're minority, majority, whatever, we don't get into that.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mixing up a small mud puddle on a Styrofoam plate, Anjni Raol, a senior at Eastern High School, drew a small crowd of curious shoppers. "Can I get it?" squealed 7-year-old Kelcy Lucas as she watched Raol create temporary tattoos with henna paint. "Can I?" Kelcy's father succumbed, and let her and sister Meghan, 11, get tattooed. Raol used toothpicks to slowly paint lotus pedals, curling lines and dots on the girls' hands, inspiring responses of "Ooh, that feels weird" and "Yuck, does this stuff itch?"
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was created as a visual catalyst - to fly as a reminder of the ever- increasing need to prevent race, creed and national boundaries from separating people. The 18-foot banner, known as the Dymaxion-World Flag, flew yesterday to greet the thousands of visitors at the entrance to the Fifth Annual Southern New Jersey Ethnic Festival at Glassboro State College. Containing flags from the 160 members of the United Nations, the patchwork banner set the tone for the festival as children and adults, educators and government leaders, went to celebrate the diversity of cultures in South Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 29, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. They call it the "Beep-Beep Tunnel," and when you come across it as you make your way through Glenolden Park on your walk to MacDade Boulevard, you'll immediately know why. On either side of the one-lane tunnel that takes West Knowles Avenue under the CSX rail bed, motorists must stop and honk their horns to determine that no cars are starting in...
SPORTS
June 25, 2015 | BY SHAMUS CLANCY, Daily News Staff Writer clancys@phillynews.com
FORGET THE doom and gloom of Joel Embiid and the worry of whom the Sixers will select with the third pick in the NBA draft next week. With at least five second-round selections - picks 35, 37, 47, 58 and 60 at the moment - there are other prospects who could join the team this season. Looking at the player archetypes that have attracted general manager Sam Hinkie's attention during his first two drafts in Philadelphia presents a better idea of what he values with these second-rounders.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before laying my head to rest the other night, Black Twitter blessed me with something magical. Scrolling through my feed, I noticed #unconventionalblackbeauty, a hashtag featuring photos of beautiful black faces. Not much different from #blackoutday, an online movement that celebrated black beauty, right? Wrong. The difference: This was an honest discourse about how we define beauty within the black community. In less than 24 hours, feeds exploded with photos of women and men with full lips, broad noses, and kinky hair.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2015
Min S. Suh , partner, has been appointed chair of the Philadelphia law firm Obermayer Rebmann Maxwell & Hippel L.L.P.'s diversity committee. The committee focuses on recruiting and retaining diverse lawyers and staff, as well as other diversity initiatives within the firm. Suh practices immigration law. The Phoenixville Community Education Foundation , a nonprofit that supports the Phoenixville Area School District, has named the following trustees: Jena Dietrich , managing director and marketing practice leader at Custom Institutional Fund Solutions; John Grasso , institutional sales support at SEI Investments; artist and volunteer Michelle Schamis ; and Neydary Zambrano , president of the Magic Memories Child Development Center.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing in front of about 100 people - black, white, Latino, Indian, male, female, young, old - Lisa Croft talked about the elephant in the room. "It's not just there to sit and look pretty," she said. "Sometimes we need courageous people to . . . say what that elephant is. " That was the essence of the discussion at the daylong "Courageous Conversation" at West Chester University on Saturday. The diverse crowd talked about "implicit" biases: ingrained beliefs that can influence behavior, often subconsciously.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the eve of Holy Week for the spring-cleaning crew at St. Helena's in Olney, a group of parishioners on a mission to deliver a near-spotless church for the most important week on the Christian calendar. So while the Vietnamese women's group prayed downstairs, a funeral of a onetime Anglo member concluded in the lower church, and the Spanish-language choir prepared for rehearsal, Joseph Mensah stopped polishing the floors long enough to talk about how the church helped him after he emigrated from Ghana.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. If you want the scoop on Bensalem, just ask Mayor Joseph DiGirolamo, a lifelong resident of the Bucks County community just over the Philadelphia line. "When I was growing up, 75 percent of the township was produce farms," recalls the affable DiGirolamo, who ran his family's operation from age 26 until he retired at 51. "It wasn't until after World War II, and especially in the 1960s" that the township's fields filled with houses and apartment buildings, he says, somewhat nostalgically.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
FIBER SCULPTOR Carole Loeffler spent her year's sabbatical from Arcadia University strolling in her Germantown neighborhood with her baby son, stuffing her pockets with fallen leaves. Back in her home studio, she transformed her finds into something magical and very red. Her new "Quietude" exhibit at Holy Family University Art Gallery on Frankford Avenue near Stevenson Street in Torresdale, reflects her walks on leafy Germantown streets, seen through her red-tinted imagination.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Horsham is "a little different market" when compared with surrounding communities, veteran real estate agent Gary Segal says. For one thing, he notes, even in the off-season that runs from just before Thanksgiving to a week after Super Bowl Sunday, the market here is "fairly hot. " Says Segal: "I sold a couple of real good ones" - including newly constructed houses, which command the top prices in any market - "that brought the second-highest price in Horsham this year to a [relocation]
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbis Debra Bowen and Jon Cutler lead congregations that diverge from mainstream Judaism - in very different ways. Cutler shepherds a small Warrington congregation that meets on alternate Fridays. His synagogue aims to be a place where being Jewish is not tied to a conventional menu of ritual and requirements. Bowen's congregation is largely African American. It was founded by her mother and until recent years worshiped off the radar at a synagogue that was once a church building in West Oak Lane.
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