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Diversity

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NEWS
June 4, 2007
TO LETTER-writer Todd Cohen: I hear your complaints about your new minority neighbors. As an American of African descent, I truly understand, crystal clearly, your feelings and experience. However, the people that I suggested to move into communities, such as the Northeast, to cure the "white-flightitis" are the ones with a mentality like Tiger Woods, Larry Elder, Michael Nutter, the late Fred Rogers, Mother Teresa, and even syndicated radio host Delilah. These individuals would respect the properties, neighbors (like you and I)
NEWS
August 2, 2007 | By CHARISSE LILLIE
PHILADELPHIA is known for many things - birthplace of our country's independence, home of the Liberty Bell, world-famous cheesesteaks, to name a few. But what doesn't get as much attention are the great things corporations are doing in Center City to help build a future for our youth. Yesterday, Comcast hosted over 60 minority students from all backgrounds and walks of life. Some are working at our headquarters in Center City this summer, others in regional internship programs funded by Comcast.
SPORTS
January 10, 2006 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Temple is one of 10 Division I-A institutions to earn the overall excellence in diversity award bestowed by the Laboratory for Diversity in Sport at Texas A&M University, Temple officials announced yesterday. The award recognizes the NCAA Division I-A athletic departments that excel in diversity. "I am extremely pleased that the Temple athletics department has received this recognition," Bill Bradshaw, Temple's director of athletics, said in a statement. "This is an area that Temple University takes pride in, not just in athletics, but in all areas of the university.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
ANYONE who reads Michelle Malkin's diatribe regarding diversity in the media and does not conclude that she is as crazy as a loon is in the same boat as she is. Her media-diversity test exposes her as an intellectual lightweight. Her list of 20 questions to determine your cultural and ideological viewpoint on diversity does nothing more than stereotype the people she is trying to elevate. Ms. Malkin tries to position herself as the arbiter of all things "diverse. " Yet her column seem to be excluding her from participating in her chosen profession.
NEWS
March 31, 2003
Diversity should not be a factor in admissions Diversity is being distinct or unlike others; it is having variety in form. Diversity is a difference and variation in the population. Typically, when people think of what makes a body diverse, they think of having people of different races, genders, ethnicities and religions. Colleges and universities often strive to create environments that encompass such a student body. In my college experience, I have seen a moderate amount of diversity.
NEWS
January 21, 2005 | By Richard L. McCormick
In his op-ed piece ("Rutgers hire is a shill for race-based admissions," Jan. 12), lawyer Greg Sullivan criticized Rutgers University's appointment of Jonathan Alger as general counsel on the basis that Alger played a prominent role in defending the University of Michigan's admissions policies in the Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger cases. I will not and need not defend Rutgers' hiring of Alger, an immensely talented lawyer nationally recognized for his expertise on a wide range of issues important to higher education, including academic freedom, intellectual property, media rights and distance education.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By RICHARD HARWOOD
The agenda of the American newspaper ordinarily is obvious enough to its readers, consisting of such conventional stuff as crime, politics, gossip, the price of eggs and the foreign policy crisis of the week. Internally, however, our larger newspapers are preoccupied these days with something else: race and the "diversity" of their labor force. For years we were in the hypocritical position of promoting civil rights, equal opportunity, racial integration and the women's movement in all walks of life except our own. As recently as 1978, when Mississippi classrooms were fully integrated, our newsrooms were 96 percent white.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
So, you might wonder in the wake of the Dad Vail Regatta flap, do other city-supported special events have to worry about their ethnic or racial make up? Will the Greek Picnic, a gathering of African-American fraternity students, or the Steuben Day Parade have to show diversity to get a permit? Nope, at least not yet. "We don't exclude anybody from the process," said Acting Managing Director Joe Certaine, "whether they're minority, majority, whatever, we don't get into that.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mixing up a small mud puddle on a Styrofoam plate, Anjni Raol, a senior at Eastern High School, drew a small crowd of curious shoppers. "Can I get it?" squealed 7-year-old Kelcy Lucas as she watched Raol create temporary tattoos with henna paint. "Can I?" Kelcy's father succumbed, and let her and sister Meghan, 11, get tattooed. Raol used toothpicks to slowly paint lotus pedals, curling lines and dots on the girls' hands, inspiring responses of "Ooh, that feels weird" and "Yuck, does this stuff itch?"
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was created as a visual catalyst - to fly as a reminder of the ever- increasing need to prevent race, creed and national boundaries from separating people. The 18-foot banner, known as the Dymaxion-World Flag, flew yesterday to greet the thousands of visitors at the entrance to the Fifth Annual Southern New Jersey Ethnic Festival at Glassboro State College. Containing flags from the 160 members of the United Nations, the patchwork banner set the tone for the festival as children and adults, educators and government leaders, went to celebrate the diversity of cultures in South Jersey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2016
One of the best things that could happen to TV this fall would be for JJ DiMeo to become just another sitcom character. The oldest child on ABC's Speechless , which premieres Sept. 21 between The Goldbergs and Modern Family (and is previewing early on ABC.com ), JJ is, like many TV teens, good-looking and a bit of a smart-ass. Like his mother, Maya (Minnie Driver), he challenges authority. Including hers. And like Micah Fowler ( Labor Day ), the actor who plays him, JJ has cerebral palsy.
NEWS
September 5, 2016
Jonathan Zimmerman teaches education and history at the University of Pennsylvania and is the author of "Campus Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know" (Oxford University Press), which was released last week Affirmative action has reached middle age. It's been almost 40 years since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that universities could consider race in admissions as a way to enhance student diversity. Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978) barred schools from giving an advantage to minority students if the purpose was to compensate for historic discrimination against them.
SPORTS
August 21, 2016 | By Ed Rendell
I REMEMBER being at the Opening Ceremony of the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta and watching the parade of nations. As the host country, the United States entered last. I watched as the nations of the world entered in alphabetical order and it was fun seeing their pride and high spirits. And then finally the long-awaited American team entered. As I had done with the other teams, I watched our team through binoculars, and they were displaying the same joy and spirit the other teams did. But one thing was different - where almost all of the other teams were practically homogeneous (they all looked the same)
NEWS
August 13, 2016
By Naomi Moland S esame Street recently announced that it was dismissing three of its original cast members: Bob McGrath (Bob), Emilio Delgado (Luis), and Roscoe Orman (Gordon). After an outcry from longtime fans, the show reversed its decision, and will meet with the actors in September to continue their relationship. Welcoming these characters back onto the Street is an excellent decision. The program has been undergoing many changes, adapting to the needs of today's children.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Supermodel and new mom Chrissy Teigen , wife of Penn alum John Legend and a beautiful mixture of Norwegian and Thai, took to Twitter to weigh in on the 2016 Miss Teen USA competition. Rarely one to court controversy, Teigen was moved to tweet when the Miss Teen USA Twitter account released a photo of the top five finishers and it looked like a prismatic pic of the same girl. "Wow how can we choose from such a diverse bunch," @chrissyteigen wrote. Perhaps concerned about becoming a target for trolls, Teigen soon tweeted, "It's fiiiiiine.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Former cleaning lady Donna Allie, 59, took a big step, or a leap of faith, to go from scrubbing bathrooms in Bryn Mawr to washing down stadiums in Philadelphia. Allie, president of Team Clean Inc., told a contractor her firm could provide 200 workers to clean Veterans Stadium when she had only eight workers, dispatched to homes on the Main Line. Team Clean now has 700. Given Hillary Clinton's nomination at next week's convention, what do women need to learn to lead? We don't think big enough.
NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Signe Wilkinson, Staff Writer
"We're voting for Hillary," Charles Lindsey says about himself and his friend Gregory McDowell as they sat on their Fairhill steps. They were among a dozen people I interviewed along four blocks of Cambria Street on both sides of Germantown Avenue. For those who think that's the way all of solidly Democratic North Philadelphia feels, walk a few steps farther. On Germantown Avenue and Cambria, Josh Rembert says, "I can't vote for Hillary. " He then veers wildly from the Democratic script to call out Donald Trump's immigration policy and business background as the reasons why he'd vote for the GOP ticket.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
This week, 4,765 delegates from 50 states, five territories, and the District of Columbia are arriving in Philadelphia. That's 4,765 life stories, and 4,765 sets of ideologies, priorities, hopes, and attitudes about what the Democratic National Convention should achieve. Delegates range in age from their teens to their 90s. They are gay and straight, and transgender. They span all races and ethnicities. They include members of Congress, governors, and party leaders, but also students, unemployed people, schoolteachers, mechanics, web developers, lawyers, and retirees.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
The storm clouds that hopscotched around the city all afternoon shed only their grace - no rain - on the Philadelphia Orchestra on Friday night at Penn's Landing. Earlier rumbles quieted, clearing the air for patriotic - or at least American - tunes played for an avid crowd. Just the stage area attracted an estimated 10,000 to 12,000 listeners, according to a spokeswoman for the Delaware River Waterfront Corp., with more eavesdropping on the free, hour-long concert through speakers in other perches near the river.
NEWS
June 30, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. DEVELOPMENT Diversity lost in One Water Street deal I thought the idea behind giving developers a zoning bonus allowing taller buildings in exchange for a certain number of affordable-housing units was to encourage people of various income levels to come in contact with each other. Such a policy would discourage isolated pockets of wealthy and low- and moderate-income families. The deal the city reached with PMC Property Group, builders of the 250-unit One Water Street apartment building on the Delaware waterfront, contributes to just the opposite ("Developer to pay for affordable housing," Saturday)
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