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Diversity Training

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BUSINESS
November 17, 1996 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Maida Odom contributed to this report
Texaco Inc. looked as though it wanted its executives to be more sensitive to African Americans and other minorities. The company brought in one of the most respected - and expensive - diversity trainers in the nation, R. Roosevelt Thomas of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, in Atlanta. It made sure senior-level executives took the training, a move that should have sent a message throughout the company that Texaco took diversity seriously. It recruited some blacks into prominent positions.
NEWS
January 29, 2010
RE STU Bykofsky's column on the tefillin incident: May I suggest that he's far too nice and forgiving? When I came to Philadelphia in 1982 after being born and raised in New York, I remember planning to leave my office early in advance of Rosh Hashana. I said to my husband that I would catch an earlier train. He said, what makes you think there will be an earlier train? I naively replied that, in New York, they always put on more trains for people going home early for the Jewish holidays.
SPORTS
March 16, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
In the Atlanta Braves' new world of baseball, curbing foul mouths has become as important as catching foul balls. Taking a page from corporate America's playbook, the Braves' front office has hired a diversity expert to help coach the team through the difficult time following John Rocker's infamous remarks. Along with stretching exercises, the team has spent a portion of spring training in some soul-searching with the help of Cook Ross, a Silver Spring, Md., consulting firm.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If no one ever calls the Community Awareness Hot Line, Arnelia Hollinger won't mind. "We're not sitting around waiting for the phone to ring," said Hollinger, chairwoman of the Community Awareness committee, which was formed in March 1997 after complaints of police harassment from minority residents. "We're trying to make sure there are no reasons to call. " As part of its effort, the committee - composed of minority residents, clergy and students, and police officers and township officials - has organized a three-day diversity training course for the 47 members of the Police Department.
NEWS
November 7, 2009 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A formal settlement has been reached in an eight-year racial-discrimination lawsuit brought by two Camden deputy fire chiefs against the city and its fire chief. Under the agreement, Terrence Crowder, who retired from the department in May, and Kevin Hailey, who is expected to retire next year, will receive $1.15 million. In addition, Fire Chief Joseph Marini will step down, and all supervisory fire officers with the rank of captain or higher will undergo diversity training.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | By Aaron Epstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Taxpayers will pick up the tab for emotional injuries linked to government- sponsored "diversity training" programs that went too far in teaching workers about sexual and racial harassment. The Federal Aviation Administration has agreed to pay $75,000 to a female air traffic controller who apparently suffered a mental breakdown after her past personal agonies resurfaced when intense group discussions turned to talk of intimate sexual experiences. And there may be more fallout ahead.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
A story on campaign contributions to newly elected House member Jon Runyan did not appear in all editions of Sunday's Inquirer. The story can be found on B4. A story in Sunday's Inquirer on the Philadelphia Housing Authority's hiring of belly dancers and yodelers as part of its diversity training incorrectly described the role of Kirk Dorn, a former PHA official. Dorn said he attended the festivities that capped a full program of diversity training, but was not involved in the planning.
NEWS
December 16, 2003 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A South Philadelphia principal who used a severe racial epithet while talking to students was returned to her school yesterday after results of a school district investigation confirmed her account of the incident. District officials said Mary Rita Sheldon, principal of the Overbrook Educational Center, would not be disciplined. "We think she exhibited poor judgment and lack of tact," said school district spokeswoman Cecilia Cummings. "And the entire school - all the adults - will be going to diversity training.
NEWS
December 11, 2003 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fueled by parents' complaints, Philadelphia School District officials are investigating an elementary school principal who is accused of using a racially derogatory term while talking to students. District officials have not decided whether to take disciplinary action against Mary Rita Sheldon, principal of Overbrook Educational Center, a kindergarten-through-eighth-grade school with a largely African American student body. But the investigation so far has led the district to mandate "diversity training" for the entire staff, including the principal, said Janet Samuels, who heads the West Regional Office overseeing Overbrook.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was, as one parent described it later, a "love fest" - people waving signs and declaring their support of Philadelphia School Superintendent Arlene Ackerman. The outpouring came at yesterday's School Reform Commission meeting, where a state representative and several parents spoke glowingly of Ackerman, who in the last month has taken heat for her handling of racial violence at South Philadelphia High. "We all need to follow your leadership," Rep. Tony Payton Jr. (D., Phila.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 26, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
A RAUCOUS CROWD of hundreds packed a Coatesville school board meeting last night as furor continued to swirl around dozens of text messages in which two school administrators hurled racial epithets and other slurs about students and faculty members. Members of the crowd, which spilled into the aisles and out the doors of a 750-seat auditorium at Coatesville Area Senior High School, demanded that the board fire former superintendent Richard Como and former high-school athletic director Jim Donato outright over the texts, which came to light this weekend, rather than accept their resignations.
NEWS
December 6, 2010
A story on campaign contributions to newly elected House member Jon Runyan did not appear in all editions of Sunday's Inquirer. The story can be found on B4. A story in Sunday's Inquirer on the Philadelphia Housing Authority's hiring of belly dancers and yodelers as part of its diversity training incorrectly described the role of Kirk Dorn, a former PHA official. Dorn said he attended the festivities that capped a full program of diversity training, but was not involved in the planning.
NEWS
December 5, 2010 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the federal government cutting housing subsidies in 2006, Philadelphia Housing Authority managers spared no expense to take "diversity awareness to a new level. " How else to explain the karaoke singers, salsa dance instructor, Swiss Alps yodelers, and belly dancers who were mingling with PHA middle managers at the Wilson Park Community Center? The cost: about $17,150, including $1,200 for the belly dancers. The evening's finale began when four exotically clad belly dancers pulled members of the audience into their show.
NEWS
January 29, 2010
RE STU Bykofsky's column on the tefillin incident: May I suggest that he's far too nice and forgiving? When I came to Philadelphia in 1982 after being born and raised in New York, I remember planning to leave my office early in advance of Rosh Hashana. I said to my husband that I would catch an earlier train. He said, what makes you think there will be an earlier train? I naively replied that, in New York, they always put on more trains for people going home early for the Jewish holidays.
NEWS
January 19, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
Until yesterday, Erica Riddick had never really interacted with her immigrant counterparts at South Philly High, who spend most of the school day in bilingual classes on the second floor. Riddick, 17, and a group of students of many races and ethnicities gathered on the second floor of the school, which was the site last month of attacks on Asian students by a group of black students. "I liked interacting with new people I didn't know and learning new stuff about the Asian culture," she said.
NEWS
January 14, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was, as one parent described it later, a "love fest" - people waving signs and declaring their support of Philadelphia School Superintendent Arlene Ackerman. The outpouring came at yesterday's School Reform Commission meeting, where a state representative and several parents spoke glowingly of Ackerman, who in the last month has taken heat for her handling of racial violence at South Philadelphia High. "We all need to follow your leadership," Rep. Tony Payton Jr. (D., Phila.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The racial violence at South Philadelphia High School last month has drawn the official attention of yet another government agency. The Mayor's Commission on Asian American Affairs yesterday expressed "deep concern" over the Dec. 3 beatings of 30 Asian students by large groups of primarily African American pupils, and announced that it would monitor the situation at the school. The advisory commission, which has no enforcement power, is at least the sixth authority to open an investigation, hold hearings, or focus an official eye on the school.
NEWS
December 30, 2009 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A state panel has voted to investigate allegations of racial discrimination against immigrant students at South Philadelphia High, the second such independent probe. The Pennsylvania Commission of Human Relations' inquiry could expand to examine bias against immigrants throughout the Philadelphia School District, said Stephen A. Glassman, chair of the commission. The commission voted to open the probe on Monday night - after a private meeting with district officials and a public session where community members said students still felt targeted at the school.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By Jeff Gammage and Kristen Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Throughout Tuesday night's meeting with Asian students, immersed in a tense boycott of South Philadelphia High School after racial attacks, district Superintendent Arlene Ackerman told the youths they must come back to class. At different points, participants said yesterday, she took different tacks: She urged them to come back. She ordered them to come back. She warned them they had better come back. Finally, as the meeting wound toward an end, two hours after it started, she appealed to them to come back.
NEWS
December 8, 2009
A city with a long history of racism against African Americans can't afford to dismiss allegations that Asian students have now become the targets of blacks. Dozens of Asian students at South Philadelphia High School say they have faced verbal and physical abuse by African American students. Even more troubling, students and community activists say, the alleged racial violence has been happening for years, and the district has not done enough to address the problem. District officials contend that, overall, violence at the school is down 55 percent, and that progress has been made to improve race relations.
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