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Diversity

NEWS
November 2, 2005
With a $50 million budget and 3,000 employees, Delaware County government ranks as one of the major employers in the Pennsylvania suburbs. But don't kick yourself for not having heard of it. The Republican organization that has controlled Delaware County Council for 30 years prefers a low profile. Indeed, quiet, status-quo government that doesn't ruffle or roil voters has been a long-term prescription for victory for the GOP. Notably, Republican incumbent Linda Cartisano has already vowed that there will be no county property tax increase in 2006.
NEWS
July 11, 2008 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
DIVERSITY is like Weight Watchers: You pick one dish from each category for a well-balanced diet. But while that might be fine for the waistline and nutrition, force-feeding can be dangerous to our civic health. I'm not talking about the magnificent melting-pot stew created by immigrants who, through the generations, layered their own rich experiences over the bedrock of American principles. That's an undisputable source of our strength. I'm referring to something newer and more insidious, something that values tolerance over unity and gives inordinate importance to color, creed, gender and sexual orientation.
SPORTS
January 7, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Ottawa Senators center Vaclav Prospal escaped suspension yesterday for his ethnic slur against Montreal Canadiens defenseman Patrice Brisebois, but must attend a diversity-training session. Prospal, who called Brisebois a "frog" - punctuated by an obscenity - in a Dec. 27 game, was told to come to New York to meet with NHL-appointed diversity trainer Zach Minor for further education and discussion regarding diversity-related issues. The league deemed Prospal's public apology to French Canadians as sufficient, especially because it was accepted by the Canadiens and Brisebois.
NEWS
March 4, 1993
On Inauguration Day, the Washington Post quoted stories that had been written when past administrations faced delays in filling sub-Cabinet vacancies. For the Carter, Reagan and Bush administrations, the delays reached beyond February and into March. The snail's pace in filling appointments was blamed on the FBI, on the White House staff and on Congress. The Clinton administration has followed this tradition. The hospitalization of Defense Secretary Les Aspin spotlighted the fact that none of his deputies had been confirmed.
NEWS
September 20, 2006 | By Dick Smith
Glancing through my son's Amherst College magazine, I noted the college president stated student diversity and dedication can lead to achievement. A wonderful concept, but hardly a new one. Temple University has stressed diversity for well over a century. Let me take you back 60 years to my own experience. Attending Temple in the late 1940s was exhilarating. War veterans and those just out of high school in our journalism and creative writing classes wondered if we could make it in our chosen fields.
SPORTS
January 25, 2003 | By Mike Bruton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Minority hiring, changes in overtime rules, and the continuing instability of franchises that want new stadiums dominated NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue's State of the NFL address yesterday. Tagliabue said he was pleased with the progress of diversity in the hiring of coaches. He cited the selection of Marvin Lewis as head coach of the Cincinnati Bengals and James Harris as vice president of player personnel of the Jacksonville Jaguars, and the installment of defensive coordinator Leslie Frazier and five other blacks on Lewis' staff.
NEWS
February 21, 2003 | By Thomas Fleming
Tomorrow the National Center for the American Revolution and the National Park Service will commemorate a forgotten anniversary at Valley Forge: the first public celebration of George Washington's birthday. It is also a celebration of American diversity, though too few Americans realize it. It was a modest observance. Twenty-one members of the Continental Artillery Band marched to Washington's headquarters and serenaded the general as he was getting ready for bed. Afterward, Martha Washington came out to thank the soldiers and gave them 15 shillings - perhaps $100 in today's money - for a tip. Few realize the diversity of Washington's army at Valley Forge.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In response to complaints by staffers at The Inquirer that the newsroom lost a disproportionate number of minority journalists in layoffs earlier this month, publisher Brian Tierney agreed yesterday to reinstate a diversity committee that he said previous management had allowed to lapse. But Tierney and Inquirer editor William K. Marimow, who met yesterday with members of an ad hoc group of staff members protesting the cuts, said they could not promise to meet another of its goals: rescinding some of the layoffs.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY MARC J. DUNKELMAN
AMERICANS LIKE to believe that our exceptional story was cooked up in the proverbial melting pot. And it's true that we've broadly taken strength from our diversity. But the way we engage our differences has more recently begun to shift. We're more tolerant today than we've ever been, but we're also more likely to wall ourselves off from those who hold opposing points of view. As a result, the latitude to lead lives of our own choosing allows and sometimes compels us to narrow the horizons of our individual experience.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By Eileen Kenna, Special to The Inquirer
Diversity. Multiculturalism. Political correctness. Those buzzwords were at the heart of a debate broadcast live via satellite from Washington on Wednesday to more than 200 U.S. college campuses, including Temple University's Ambler campus. "Diversity in Higher Education: Can We Meet The Challenge?" was sponsored by Cox, Matthews & Associates Inc., publishers of the monthly journal Black Issues in Higher Education. The two-hour "videoconference" featured a nine- member panel of both proponents and opponents of multiculturalism in college classrooms.
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