CollectionsDiversity
IN THE NEWS

Diversity

NEWS
December 21, 2001 | By Harold Jackson
The decisions this week of the Cherry Hill Board of Education and the school system's superintendent, Morton Sherman, to abandon efforts to achieve racial balance are wrong - plain and simple. Their defiant instructions to the state Department of Education that Cherry Hill schools will instead intensify efforts to improve academic achievement among minority students should be deemed unacceptable. Unfortunately, the state's initial response - a meek offer to continue working with the district - suggests that the suburban system may be allowed to do whatever it jolly well pleases.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong and Leslie Scism, Daily News Staff Writers
Philadelphia has the sturdiest economy of any metropolitan area in the country. That's according to an upcoming special issue of Money magazine, which ranks the city No. 1 in the nation in terms of being economically diversified. In its summer 1991 "Money Guide: How to Start and Run Your Business," the magazine notes that cities with a wide range of industries are "usually better able to shrug off an economic downturn than those that lack diversity. " The issue goes on sale Monday.
NEWS
December 8, 1986 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
He seemed offended. His hand shot up from the back of the room right after I said much of the problem with newspapers has been that policy decisions were the sole province of white males over 40. "If your theory is correct, then why wouldn't we need editorial boards with 253 people on them to represent everyone's concerns?," asked the lone white male in this Stanford University graduate class in journalism, which also included 14 women and one Asian-American male. His flat expression said he didn't buy my response about the diversity of this society and the critical need for some of that diversity in journalism - the industry that claims to accurately reflect societal images.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | Helen UbiƱas, Daily News Columnist
A LOT of people in this city understand that embracing diversity isn't just about sensitivity. It's about survival. In a conversation I had with Mayor Nutter in May, he said that if Philadelphia wants to thrive, it needs to embrace its changing demographics. That includes an increasing number of new immigrants who are buying homes, opening businesses and in 2010 were a huge part of Philadelphia's first population increase in decades. The city gets it. So why don't the Mummers?
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This comfortable community on the fringes of the Illinois prairie has a nice mix of homes, from new subdivisions to old Cape Cods, and a thriving commercial corridor with hotels and shops and restaurants. What there are not, however, are enough white residents to suit many people - both white and black - who live here. And so the town is in the midst of a $65,000 advertising campaign to attract new white families. The ads themselves don't say that. They simply celebrate the community's diversity.
NEWS
December 8, 2010
I find this constant rush to judgment of Philadelphia School Superintendent Arlene Ackerman, a leader who has demonstrated that she is willing to make doing business in Philadelphia more inclusive, very troubling ("Don't trust public officials? Why not?" Sunday). With 44 percent of the city population being African American, 9 percent Latino, and 5 percent Asian, and with 80 percent of the students in the school district belonging in one of these ethnic groups, it would seem admirable to look for opportunities to make the dispersal of contracts more equitable.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
The country is tearing itself apart over "diversity. " Extreme conservatives have favorite causes they love to holler about. Why did Leonard Jeffries' race matter more than his nonexistent scholarship when CCNY - to its later chagrin - made him a tenured professor? Why is President Clinton even considering a radical like Lani Guinier to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division - could it be that she happens to be black? Anyone with common sense would agree that Jeffries and Guinier represent diversity gone berserk.
NEWS
May 22, 1995 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one room, Kelly Vaughns stood with her paintbrush aloft, chatting with Mary Catherine McGinley and Elizabeth Formoso, who smoothed brown strips over a papier-mache head. In another, Charles Berry and Carlos Crespo shared a piano bench as they wound spools of yellow string into antique-style tassels. Li Troung studied a sign language interpreter's deft hands, reading her instructions for making wigs out of black yarn. Kyle Spencer, fascinated by the flawless translation, studied Troung.
NEWS
April 5, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Much of the study of African Americans and Jews relates to relationships between the two groups. But Lewis Ricardo Gordon, a Jamaica-born, Yale-educated author and Temple University professor, is studying African-Americans who are Jews. And he's not just talking about people of color who became Jews as a result of their parents' inter-marriage or conversion. The founder of Temple University's Institute for the Study of Race and Social Thought and its Center for Afro-Jewish Studies, Gordon, 44, says Jews are among the most racially diverse people on the globe - and many don't even know it. Gordon traces his lineage to Jewish maternal grandparents from Israel and Ireland and describes himself as a secular Jew. Religious observances were not a big part of his childhood, but they are important to him now. And he counts himself among America's largely invisible black Jews.
NEWS
March 15, 2001 | By Oshrat Carmiel INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Facing pressure from a civil-liberties group, officials at Bucks County Community College have withdrawn the question on the college's job application that asks potential employees about their commitment to diversity. The question has been protested by a college sociology professor and the Philadelphia-based Foundation for Individual Rights in Education Inc., both of whom labeled the diversity query a McCarthyist tactic that could stifle free speech. The college, which has argued that the question reflected its broad commitment to diversity in regard to race, sex and age, eliminated the query at the last Board of Trustees meeting.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|