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Diversity

NEWS
January 13, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The original Dim Sum Garden was a definitive Chinatown dumpling dive, a no-frills storefront under the 11th Street tunnel where devotees braved bus fumes and panhandlers for xiao long bao, the broth-filled Shanghai wonders also known as "soup dumplings. "By comparison, the new Dim Sum Garden, which opened on Race Street in September, is a veritable palace, all curvy lines with layered stone walls and a bright, open kitchen. The airy room, with triple the seating of the old location and a dumpling factory in the basement, is the vision of Dajuan "Sally" Song, 29, a former fashion designer and business student who persuaded her mother and partner, chef Shizhou Da, to overcome her reluctance to make the leap.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
To make clear: Michael Griffin was welcome to teach at Bensalem's Holy Ghost Prep as long as he and his male companion simply lived in sin. Once Griffin told the school principal of his intention to marry, all bets were off. On Friday, the veteran teacher was fired. Administrators long knew about his relationship, Griffin said, but were comfortable looking the other way. Going public and being legal was too much. It's the Catholic Church's twisted version of Don't Ask, Don't Tell.
SPORTS
November 1, 2013 | By Bill Fleischman, Daily News Columnist
DARRELL WALLACE Jr.'s victory in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race at Martinsville, Va., Saturday would have attracted attention under normal circumstances. Wallace is a young (20), talented racer, which NASCAR needs. That Wallace is product of NASCAR's Drive for Diversity program focused greater attention on his victory. Wallace is the first African-American to win a NASCAR race since Wendell Scott won at Jacksonville, Fla., in 1963. Talk about long overdue . . . "This means everything," Wallace said.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
MANY a "world music" proponent thinks it a pretty rad proposition to mix one or two culturally diverse elements - say African tribal folk with acoustic blues, or Latin jazz with a touch of techno. Idan Raichel takes it a whole lot further, mashing up a super-rich stew of cultures and traditions - Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Latin America, European and African - in a wondrously unexpected, richly rhythmic and mellifluous way. Then he casually characterizes such derring-do as "the natural order of things, just a reflection of the street life I encounter on a daily basis.
SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rob Moore's instructions fell on deaf ears. His Ben Franklin boys' soccer team was ahead by five goals, and it would win by seven, but the coach needed one of his defenders to stay disciplined. The player didn't, and Moore was exasperated. He turned and asked his assistant, Moussa Fane, why no one listens. One reason is that, like the Nigerian defender, some of his players have trouble understanding him. And most have never actually played organized soccer before. Moore coaches a team of 17 immigrants.
SPORTS
September 27, 2013 | By Lou Rabito, Inquirer Columnist
This is Coatesville Area High School. It's Rip Hamilton and John Allen and Ryan Primanti and Aja Anderson and Jim "Scoogie" Smith. It's Derrick Morgan and Manny Stocker and Dae-Hon Cheung. And Daquan Worley and Emmett Hunt and Tyler Burke. It's Sonya Perry and Steve McCarter and Ross Kershey and Darrel Lewis. It's a football team as diverse as any in the region led by a head coach, Matt Ortega, whose mother is Irish and German and whose father is Mexican. "Our strength is our diversity," Ortega said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | BY SHAUN BRADY, For the Daily News
STEPPING out the back door of Asian Arts Initiative's Vine Street home, Gayle Isa was quick to acknowledge the challenge presented by the bleak alleyway that greeted her. "As you can tell, there's a lot of transformation to be done," said AAI's founder and executive director, as she scanned the piles of garbage and graffiti-covered walls that line the 1200 block of Pearl Street. "In polite terms, we've been calling it an 'underutilized alleyway,' " Isa continued. "I think most people who live in this neighborhood would feel that it's not a safe place.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bashar al-Assad, president of Syria, is embroiled in civil war and accusations of chemical warfare against his own people. So what does he do? He takes the offensive. Instagram and Twitter. To the horror of many, Assad posted pics of himself, calm and in control, at work at his desk, meeting state leaders. Asma, his wife, helps out at a food line, hugs real people. And then there's the odd branding. His Mac is in view. Asma sports a hip aquamarine Jawbone UP wristband pedometer.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON Princeton has a problem. The renowned university released a report Thursday on the state of the school's diversity, highlighting areas where perceived gaps exist and offering recommendations to improve diversity among its students, faculty, and staff. "To begin with, ours is an increasingly pluralistic society," the report reads, "and, simply put, Princeton and its peers do not come close to looking like America today. " The report's suggestions include formalizing the university's position on diversity, creating plans within academic departments for recruiting a range of students and faculty, and establishing benchmarks to be monitored on a regular basis.
FOOD
August 30, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Will Janette Desautel ever cook her famous crawfish ravioli again? The fictional chef in HBO's Treme practically ripped her business partner's head off like a crawdaddy at a boil when the subject arose at the end of last season. "No. No [expletive] frozen crawfish, ever," said Desautel. "It is a seasonal special. People will look forward to it all year long. " Fans of Treme , the series based in post-Katrina New Orleans that has earned a relatively small but devoted following, are surely looking forward to its final season, debuting this fall, when Desautel's culinary fate, along with the show's numerous other story lines, are hopefully resolved.
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