CollectionsDiversity
IN THE NEWS

Diversity

NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bashar al-Assad, president of Syria, is embroiled in civil war and accusations of chemical warfare against his own people. So what does he do? He takes the offensive. Instagram and Twitter. To the horror of many, Assad posted pics of himself, calm and in control, at work at his desk, meeting state leaders. Asma, his wife, helps out at a food line, hugs real people. And then there's the odd branding. His Mac is in view. Asma sports a hip aquamarine Jawbone UP wristband pedometer.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRINCETON Princeton has a problem. The renowned university released a report Thursday on the state of the school's diversity, highlighting areas where perceived gaps exist and offering recommendations to improve diversity among its students, faculty, and staff. "To begin with, ours is an increasingly pluralistic society," the report reads, "and, simply put, Princeton and its peers do not come close to looking like America today. " The report's suggestions include formalizing the university's position on diversity, creating plans within academic departments for recruiting a range of students and faculty, and establishing benchmarks to be monitored on a regular basis.
FOOD
August 30, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Will Janette Desautel ever cook her famous crawfish ravioli again? The fictional chef in HBO's Treme practically ripped her business partner's head off like a crawdaddy at a boil when the subject arose at the end of last season. "No. No [expletive] frozen crawfish, ever," said Desautel. "It is a seasonal special. People will look forward to it all year long. " Fans of Treme , the series based in post-Katrina New Orleans that has earned a relatively small but devoted following, are surely looking forward to its final season, debuting this fall, when Desautel's culinary fate, along with the show's numerous other story lines, are hopefully resolved.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
AS HURRICANE IRENE blew toward Philadelphia on Aug. 27, 2011, bringing floods, power outages and property devastation, hundreds of people hurried to the Max Myers Recreation Center in Castor Gardens for the first Northeast Celebration. It was then that Jared Solomon, president of the Take Back Your Neighborhood community association that organized the celebration of all things Northeast Philadelphia, knew he had created something stronger than the approaching storm. No such natural disaster threatens the third annual Northeast Celebration today at Max Myers Rec, on Hellerman Street near Horrocks.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
Since 1995, Haverford College has augmented its already substantial photography holdings with financial help from alumni Michael Fogel and his son Rafael, acquiring 52 works by 41 photographers that enhance the collection's core and push it in new directions. Begun in 1870, it contains some 5,000 works by more than 500 photographers; now 40 of those works can be seen in "The Fogel Collection: A Collection Within a Collection," in the college's Atrium Gallery. It's a diverse a group - classic works by household names (Elliott Erwitt, William Klein, William Wegman)
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Decked out in her Jamaican flag dress, 2-year-old Isis Jones danced to the various evangelical performances alongside her family Sunday during International Day at Abundant Life Fellowship Church in Edgewater Park. Isis, like many others, was representing her family's home country through her clothing. Others wore traditional African dresses representative of their region or tribe. It was the Burlington County church's annual event, in which other South Jersey and Philadelphia churches join the congregation in celebrating the unity of people.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's a good thing red bread mold grows so quickly. Camden County College student Paul Manofu has only a few weeks to study the effects of tobacco on the fast-growing Neurospora crassa , considered a "model organism" for research because of its 24-hour growth spurts. He's hoping the experiment offers clues in the study of the "internal clock" that helps regulate cycles such as sleeping patterns, eating times, and energy levels. It's all part of a larger project led by Rutgers-Camden biology professor Kwangwon Lee. "If the circadian rhythm is altered in the model organism, it's likely to be modeled in humans as well," Manofu said, as he examined six glass tubes bound together with the fungus growing inside, fuzzy bursts of peach-colored mold every few inches.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Hamza Hendawi, Associated Press
CAIRO - Egypt's interim leader swore in a cabinet on Tuesday that included women and Christians but no Islamists as the military-backed administration moved swiftly to formalize the new political order and present a more liberal face that is markedly at odds with the deposed president and his supporters. The changes came at a time of deep polarization and violence in Egypt, including new clashes that killed seven people as part of the continuing bloodshed that has marked the days following the armed forces coup that swept President Mohammed Morsi from office and cracked down on the Muslim Brotherhood.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
By Catharine B. Hill The Supreme Court's decision in the Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case finally arrived, with a call for lower courts to now decide whether universities' admissions policies involving race are tailored narrowly enough. A university is to demonstrate, "before turning to racial classifications, that available, workable race-neutral alternatives do not suffice. " In anticipation of this decision, many have been arguing that socioeconomic status, rather than race, can be used as an alternative to effectively support diversity in higher education.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WHEN KETTIE Eugene arrived in Oxford Circle from her native Haiti 11 years ago, she brought along her parents' attitude toward growing your own vegetables. "If you don't grow, you don't eat," Eugene said on a recent Sunday morning, tending the plants in her raised bed at the Take Back Your Neighborhood community garden, dressed in an elegant red outfit because she had come directly from early Mass at Our Lady of Ransom Church. Being the best-dressed urban gardener in Northeast Philadelphia didn't cramp Eugene's style as she hand-watered her cucumbers, zucchini, snow peas, collard greens, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and cabbage with a sprinkler can, and planted marigolds to keep the ladybugs away.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|