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Diversity

SPORTS
August 16, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As one of eight seniors on the roster, running back Kenneth Harper knows the day is coming when the uniform he'll wear won't be Temple football's, but something more appropriate for the workforce. To get ready for that, Harper, a finance major from Gainesville, Fla., who last season led the Owls in rushing yards (613) and touchdowns (11), interned over the summer here with PNC Bank. "I worked on high-net-worth accounts," Harper said. "Asset management and portfolio management, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds, and things like that.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a question that perplexes management researchers who try to figure out why the glass ceiling is so hard to crack, particularly now that there are more minorities and women in the work world. Why is it, they ask, that women and minorities who successfully climb the corporate ladder so often pull it up behind them, not helping other women and minorities succeed? "It's sacrificing your own future if you leave the ladder down," David Hekman, an assistant professor of management at the University of Colorado, told a roomful of scholars and managers attending the Academy of Management conference in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I want to build beautiful things the world wants to use. " So said an application to an internship program with Girls Who Code, a national group that encourages young women to consider careers in computer science. Lots of women want to code, design, and be part of the communications/Internet/Web/mobile world. So do lots of people from all sorts of racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds. Problem: That world is a male shop. A white male shop. Always has been. As a report released Wednesday by Twitter Inc. makes clear, the tech workplace is not diverse.
FOOD
June 27, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
As Cristina Martinez heated a wide maguey leaf on the food cart's griddle, her husband, Benjamin Miller, reached into a warming box holding slow-cooked barbacoa lamb, and the earthy aromas of Capulhuac, Mexico, suddenly wafted over this South Philly corner at Eighth and Watkins Streets. "You want rib meat, leg, or spine?" asks Miller, assembling a one-pound package of moist flesh to be gift-wrapped inside the maguey leaf, with a pint of lamb consomme, spicy cactus salad, and a stack of fresh tortillas on the side.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, the courts and the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office began a pretrial diversion program for prostitutes offering counseling to help get off the streets. This month, courts and prosecutors moved beyond the world's oldest profession to the world's oldest customer base: johns. They called the effort SER, Sexual Education and Responsibility, and its inaugural class of 15 men completed a four-hour session May 10 at Joseph J. Peters Institute, a Center City clinic that specializes in treating sex offenders and the sexually abused.
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN When Phoebe Haddon decided her Temple law students needed a better understanding of the complex legal history of inequality, she set about creating her own course. "It came out of a conversation we'd been having for a while: That our students didn't have a strong sense of history in terms of race relations and inequality issues," said Theresa Glennon, a professor at Temple's Beasley School of Law who helped start "Seminar on Race and Ethnicity: Law, History, and Equality. " "We created all the materials ourselves, so it was really great to work with her on that," Glennon said.
NEWS
March 16, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
FOR 75 YEARS, the Crescentville Baptist Church has overlooked Rising Sun Avenue, watching it change with the decades. The church changed, too, said Pastor Charles Dear: It's now a diverse congregation with a global outlook, lending its support to the faithful all over the world. Who we are: Dear describes the church as "an independent Baptist ministry serving the community and the world. " His congregation of about 100 members consists primarily of neighborhood residents, with some members who hail from Roslyn and other nearby suburbs.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When New Jersey launched online gambling in November, almost all of the industry participants came from other countries, where online gambling has long been legal, or from Las Vegas, the epicenter of the U.S. gambling industry. KGM Gaming, a Philadelphia company started in 2004 to distribute slot machines in Pennsylvania, is trying to change that. KGM licensed games from a Nevada software developer and struck a deal to have the games included in online casinos operated by Caesars Interactive Entertainment Inc. That will give privately owned KGM a cut of casino winnings from games on the Caesars sites.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
They grew up in business families, where finding customers and getting paid was dinner-table talk - Edward E. Cohen, son of a North Philadelphia paperhanging contractor, and Betsy Zubrow, daughter of a West Philly neighborhood doctor. They were Penn Law students when they married in 1965. So it's not surprising the couple and sons Daniel and Jonathan have built a collection of companies. Or that they've listed more than a dozen firms on stock exchanges. What's unusual is the scope of the enterprises - the mix of energy (the Atlas group of companies)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The latest issues of our favorite women's magazines are filled with high-fashion ads featuring beautiful - dare I say, aspirational - African American women. Rihanna, dressed in funky, oversized pink herringbone checks by designer Olivier Rousteing, is the face of Balmain's spring 2014 campaign. Riccardo Tisci selected not one but two chocolate-toned ladies - neo-soul singer Erykah Badu and runway newcomer Riley - to model his Japanese silhouettes and African-inspired prints for Givenchy.
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