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Diversity

NEWS
March 9, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
FIBER SCULPTOR Carole Loeffler spent her year's sabbatical from Arcadia University strolling in her Germantown neighborhood with her baby son, stuffing her pockets with fallen leaves. Back in her home studio, she transformed her finds into something magical and very red. Her new "Quietude" exhibit at Holy Family University Art Gallery on Frankford Avenue near Stevenson Street in Torresdale, reflects her walks on leafy Germantown streets, seen through her red-tinted imagination.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Horsham is "a little different market" when compared with surrounding communities, veteran real estate agent Gary Segal says. For one thing, he notes, even in the off-season that runs from just before Thanksgiving to a week after Super Bowl Sunday, the market here is "fairly hot. " Says Segal: "I sold a couple of real good ones" - including newly constructed houses, which command the top prices in any market - "that brought the second-highest price in Horsham this year to a [relocation]
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbis Debra Bowen and Jon Cutler lead congregations that diverge from mainstream Judaism - in very different ways. Cutler shepherds a small Warrington congregation that meets on alternate Fridays. His synagogue aims to be a place where being Jewish is not tied to a conventional menu of ritual and requirements. Bowen's congregation is largely African American. It was founded by her mother and until recent years worshiped off the radar at a synagogue that was once a church building in West Oak Lane.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
JOSEPH Dougherty sits alone at the defense table in federal court these days, the last man standing of the 10 members of the Ironworkers Union indicted last year for using violence and vandalism against builders who hired nonunion workers. Federal prosecutors allege that Dougherty, 73, a tough-talking union boss, had subordinates do the dirty deeds, but was the instigator behind what he called "night work. " His people reveled in their tough-guy image. One of his squads referred to themselves as "The Helpful Union Guys," or THUGS.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It has long been a place where displaced Catholics have been welcomed and accepted no matter their national origin or the color of their skin. The ministry Emma "Mother" Lewis founded nearly 100 years ago for Catholics of color who were shunned by the white churches in the burgeoning resort came to be known as St. Monica's, and it may stand as one of the most diverse Roman Catholic congregations the Diocese of Camden oversees. Although Atlantic City's three other Catholic churches now welcome all comers, each Sunday and at weekday Masses, African Americans, Filipinos, Haitians, Latinos, Liberians, Nigerians, Chinese, Ugandans, and whites still join hands and worship together at St. Monica's, tucked into a neighborhood along North Pennsylvania Avenue.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
The two most daring and innovative films of 2014 - Birdman and Boyhood - couldn't be more different. Alejandro G. Iñárritu's wild, woolly backstage drama, with Michael Keaton in his tighty-whities worrying about his career and his soul, is a nonstop whirl of crackling dialogue, crackerjack performances, and careening camerawork. This story of an actor trying to shake off his winged superhero persona from decades past literally flies. Richard Linklater's Boyhood , on the other hand, is a movie about steady passage, the incremental steps in a journey from grade school to college dorm.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even now, almost 45 years later, Al Dandridge can still hear the mortar and gun fire, picture the searing chaos of battle. It was a perhaps-ill-conceived coin toss that led Dandridge to join the Marine Corps with childhood friend Christopher Billups. Billups had always wanted to be a Marine, and he insisted Dandridge go with him. Dandridge said no. So they flipped a coin. Dandridge lost. Sometime later, Dandridge, who will take over Jan. 1 as the new chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association, found himself in Vietnam.
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When students at Camden's UrbanPromise Academy high school learned they would have the chance to design Christmas ornaments to be displayed on New Jersey's tree in Washington, they wanted to reflect the range of cultures in the city and the state. So they drew religious symbols, as well as pictures to represent racial diversity, peace, and harmony, such as a world map and two hands holding. "I think it's an honor," said Chinyere Nwanosike, 16, one of two dozen students who created an ornament.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women, racial minorities, and people over 75 are underrepresented in the clinical trials that help determine the way all cardiac patients are treated, a study from Lankenau Medical Center researchers has found. This means that the recommendations that doctors use to treat heart problems may not be the best for all groups, said senior author Peter Kowey, head of Cardiology for Main Line Health. A team at Lankenau Heart Institute and Lankenau Institute for Medical Research laid out the disparities in a research letter published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
It has been a rough two years for Scott Smith of National Park since he lost his job in manufacturing. However, he remained optimistic Tuesday alongside the other hopeful candidates who filled the Collingswood Grand Ballroom at the Camden County Job Fair. "I'm looking for anything," said Smith, 55. "Two years is a long time. " While the attendees looking for a job represented a wide spread of age and education levels, the potential employers were no less diverse. More than 100 companies, from newspapers to Pepsi-Cola, were looking for candidates to hire.
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