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Dizzy Gillespie

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
This week's hot ticket: trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie at the Chestnut Cabaret, 38th and Chestnut Streets, on Monday. So what if some of the high notes and intricate runs he once knocked off now elude him? At age 69, after nearly five decades of outstanding contributions to jazz, he's a living, breathing history lesson. Besides, he remains an irresistible showman, and word has it that his current band, featuring pianist Walter Davis Jr., is his best since the one with James Moody and Kenny Barron many moons ago. Shows are at 8 and 10 p.m., and tickets cost $16. For more information, call 248-6366 or 896-6420.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Lesley Valdes and Sam Wood contributed
When a dancer accidentally stepped on the bell of Dizzy Gillespie's trumpet at a party in 1953, Gillespie didn't get angry, he got inspired. The bent horn let him hear better, he thought, and its flamboyant silhouette was transformed from a mishap into a trademark. The great ones turn their mishaps into riffs. Gillespie, who died last week at 75, played that upturned horn with a personality as bright as neon and a spirit as vaulting as his sky-walking upper register. If in recent years his health didn't let him play at his best, his older recordings still leave us with many moments when he transformed workaday concerts into flights of fancy.
NEWS
June 24, 1988 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Wednesday night's Mellon Jazz Festival concert at the Academy of Music belonged to Dizzy Gillespie - although it took hours for his turn. Before being treated to Gillespie's big band, one had to endure interminable sets by singer Dianne Reeves and soprano saxophonist Najee, as well as Gillespie's own insufferable clowning. Reeves started the long evening by singing three of her own songs, including her hit "Better Days," plus overheated interpretations of "Yesterdays" and "I Got it Bad (And That Ain't Good)
NEWS
April 5, 2013
BEBOP, the jazz subgenre that replaced the elegant melodies of big-band music with more angular and cacophonous motifs, didn't really gain a foothold until after World War II. But its roots date back almost a decade before. And some of those roots grew smack-dab in the heart of Center City. That's the inspiration behind "Last Call at the Downbeat," which, this weekend and next, has its world premiere at Society Hill Playhouse as part of the monthlong Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1990 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dizzy Gillespie's press agent, a nice lady named Virginia Wicks, assured me from California that the 72-year-old master of the cantilevered trumpet was, in effect, privy to a secret formula for avoiding jet lag and would be perfectly recovered a day and a half after returning from a tour of Europe and the Near East on which his United Nation Orchestra had played 27 concerts in 12 countries in 28 days. Dizzy himself assured me he had suffered no deleterious effects from his international merry-go-rounding when I phoned him at his home in Englewood, N.J., the day after his flight.
NEWS
January 9, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Joe Brown, the judge who presided over appeals by James Earl Ray, is stepping down to concentrate on his nationally syndicated TV show. Brown's resignation was announced in a letter last month to Tennessee Gov. Don Sundquist and the state Supreme Court. It takes effect April 15. Critics had complained that Brown, who often dishes out stinging lectures with verdicts, should choose between his role in Shelby County Criminal Court and his TV show, taped in Los Angeles in two- or three-day sessions, 24 weeks a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1992 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "New Boss" is on his way. Make that the "New Boss" of the tenor saxophone, which is what David Murray has been called. Murray will be appearing tomorrow night at the Painted Bride Art Center with the David Murray-Kahil El'Zabar Duo. Murray has drawn attention for a style that can be gruff, blustering, downright swaggering or seductively romantic. It is a big sound in the main- line tenor tradition that goes back to Coleman Hawkins and was carried on so superbly by the likes of Archie Shepp and Albert Ayler.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Dizzy Gillespie, who sounded a postwar revolution in jazz with a bent trumpet and swelled cheeks, died yesterday at age 75, his once-derided "Bebop" enthroned as the mainstream of jazz music. Gillespie died while sleeping in a chair at Englewood Hospital, where he was being treated for pancreatic cancer, said publicist Virginia Wicks. Gillespie turned jazz in new directions in at least two ways - as a founding father of bebop and by collaboration with Cuban musicians to give African-American music a Latin beat.
NEWS
June 20, 1992 | By Francis Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The good news first, followed by the bad. Today at Penn's Landing, the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival will throw a 75th birthday party for Dizzy Gillespie. The legendary trumpeter's birthday actually isn't until Oct. 21, but never mind. Along with the 25th anniversary of John Coltrane's death (Mellon PSFS has dedicated the entire festival to the late tenor saxophonist), Gillespie's diamond jubilee is the big event on this year's jazz calendar. The celebrations have been going on all year, starting with a month-long engagement at New York's Blue Note nightclub in January.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Eric Fine FOR THE INQUIRER
Danilo Perez's performance Friday at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall marked the premiere of "Things to Come: 21st Century Dizzy," the pianist's effort to broaden the scope of mainstream jazz. The program tailored the familiar bop repertoire of Perez's onetime mentor, Dizzy Gillespie, to a seven-piece band with a penchant for Latin, Middle Eastern, and Indian music. The treatment rendered Gillespie's compositions refreshingly unfamiliar, even unrecognizable at times. "Salt Peanuts" opened with a flurry of cymbals, a stray arco bass lick, and some collective improvisation that trumpeter Amir ElSaffar and saxophonists Rudresh Mahanthappa and David Sanchez performed unaccompanied.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - The place, the subject and the performers all buoyed Charlie Parker's Yardbird on its Friday opening at the famous Apollo Theater in Harlem into the sort of event that allowed Opera Philadelphia's New York debut to be a respectable success - at least. Visiting Philadelphians crowded the seats of this grand, Old World-style, 1,500-seat theater. Much cheering greeted the conclusion. Yet the piece itself (in the company's 2015 world premiere production) felt more problematic than before.
NEWS
October 5, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vincent R. Milando, 86, of Atlantic City, a former trumpeter and band leader, died of kidney failure Sunday, Sept. 29, at Cooper University Hospital in Camden. In the 1960s, he was the entertainment director for eight years for the Gaslight Club in Washington, and then for the Gaslight Club in Manhattan - not the folkie Gaslight in Greenwich Village - his daughter, Vinessa, said. The jobs, she said, "entailed choosing what was going to be played and who was in the band," she said.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the age of WikiLeaks and NSA spying, when government contractors leak like sieves, trumpeter Roy Hargrove works hard to hold back. "I never disclose what I am going to play," he says in a conspiratorial half-rasp. "People ask me, and I don't ever tell them. It destroys the whole thing. The music is a lot better when it's more spontaneous. " Hargrove and his quintet plan to explore spontaneity on Friday night for two shows at the Philadelphia Clef Club. This is no arrogant jazzman.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Philadelphia has been home to a constellation of jazz greats, including Billie Holiday and Dizzy Gillespie. One of its brightest stars was John Coltrane, the saxophonist who changed the trajectory of the form with his avant-garde experimentations in modal and free jazz. While Coltrane's Strawberry Mansion rowhouse was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1999, Philadelphians have not yet matched the virtuoso's imagination and energy in commemorating and capitalizing on his connection to the city.
NEWS
April 23, 2013
By Suzanne Cloud When Jay Wahl, director of public events at the Kimmel Center, called to tell me my proposal to do a show about Dizzy Gillespie's gig at the Downbeat Club in November 1941 had been accepted for this year's Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA), my knees went watery. What had I gotten myself into? The last play I'd written, an adaptation of Ben Jonson's 17th-century, five-act comedy Bartholomew Fair , was performed only once. Clocking in at four hours, the reading at the old Painted Bride on South Street should have required attendees to bring a sleeping bag. But, as I have always embraced writer Ralph Ellison's suggestion to "opt for that psychic uncertainty" needed to achieve one's full potential as an artist and human being, I decided to return to the boards.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
FAMILY International Orchid Show You knew we had the world's largest indoor flower show. Well, we've got the third biggest orchid show, too. On its first foray into Center City, the exhibit transforms dioramas into lush botanical arrays and teaches guests useful and amazing nuggets about these notoriously beautiful plants. Academy of Natural Sciences, 1900 Ben Franklin Pkwy., 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, $13-$15, 215-299-1000, ansp.org. Philadelphia Antiques Show Did ya know you could blow the cost of a small rowhouse on a tall armoire?
NEWS
April 5, 2013
BEBOP, the jazz subgenre that replaced the elegant melodies of big-band music with more angular and cacophonous motifs, didn't really gain a foothold until after World War II. But its roots date back almost a decade before. And some of those roots grew smack-dab in the heart of Center City. That's the inspiration behind "Last Call at the Downbeat," which, this weekend and next, has its world premiere at Society Hill Playhouse as part of the monthlong Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts.
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
For a man who started out blowing the trombone for Woody Herman, Jerry Dorn's professional career took some unusual turns. From music, he dropped in on the haberdashery business, then found his true calling: teaching kids and adults how to speak well.   To get Philadelphians to say, "How now brown cow," without that nasalized Philly twang, was a challenge, but Jerry met it. He once told an interviewer, "Vowels are the music of speech. My goal is to teach my students to become better listeners so that they can hear themselves as others hear them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
THIS TOWN has laid claim to many a jazz legend - from John Coltrane, Stan Getz and Dizzy Gillespie on down - and it used to be crawling with night spots where the talents could hone their chops. Today, you can count the clubs on one hand. Yet, there are still "at least 500 jazz musicians in the area, of all ages, trying to find work. " So says Suzanne Cloud, executive director and co-founder of the Jazz Bridge Project, now Philadelphia's most prolific nonprofit presenter of jazz and blues.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2011
Philly Celebrates Philly Joe Jones Philly Joe Jones was a monster local drummer who hit the skins as the house rhythmatist at Cafe Society, worked as the driving maelstrom of the first classic Miles Davis Quintet, and jammed with a godly roster of bop's finest - Fats Navarro, Charlie Parker, and Dizzy Gillespie among others. When he got bored with bop and tired of the straight drum-driven jazz that fueled his own albums, he moved abroad and slammed sticks for the avant-garde likes of Archie Shepp.
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