FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 13, 2001
There were unconfirmed reports that two of the Sept. 11 hijackers had New Jersey driver's licenses (Sept. 28, "Fake-ID issue puts spotlight on state"). If they did, it wouldn't surprise me. Ever since the licensing operations were privatized in 1995, New Jersey has been the motor-vehicle-fraud capital of the country. Former employees of the state Department of Motor Vehicle Services say that security is lacking in the privatized operations, and that there is little quality oversight.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Souderton's Montgomery Theater has chosen a quirky batch of plays this season, and its final offering, Ten Percent of Molly Snyder, is no exception. Richard Strand's examination of the nefarious control civil servants exert over our lives premiered at Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre in 2001. Small companies love to produce compact, direct pieces like this one: It requires one simple set, two actors, and very little time. Clocking in at just over an hour, Molly Snyder might have been paired by Montgomery with another one-act, if only to give the audience the full two-acts-with-intermission experience.
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The New Jersey Division of Motor Vehicles held opening ceremonies yesterday for its first so-called full-service agency in Deptford Township as part of the DMV's attempt to streamline service for the state's drivers. State Attorney General W. Cary Edwards, who presided at the ribbon-cutting ceremony, described the regional center on Cooper Street and Delsea Drive as a new customer-service effort for the division, which has been plagued with complaints of long lines and poor service at its local offices throughout the state.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Gov. Whitman's proposal to save $4 million by further privatization of the state Department of Motor Vehicles came under heavy fire last night at a public hearing of the Assembly Appropriations Committee at Deptford's municipal building. At least half of the 200 people in the audience opposed Whitman's plan. "A public agency has responsibility totally to the citizens for quality. Private agencies are responsible to their agent, who is concerned only with volume," said Andrea McGann, a spokeswoman for the Commercial Workers of America.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Attorney General W. Cary Edwards introduced a $306.8 million spending plan for his department yesterday and explained expensive and sweeping changes he plans to make in the problem-plagued Division of Motor Vehicles. Speaking before the Senate Revenue, Finance and Appropriations Committee, Edwards said it would take $104 million in state and federal aid to stabilize the historically inefficient DMV system and "build a solid foundation for change. " Last year, the state appropriated about $99 million to the division.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | By Winnie M. Hu, Special to The Inquirer
The Motor Vehicles Services agency on Route 541 in Burlington Township has reopened for business after undergoing a $300,000 renovation. The physical changes, which included enlarging the reception area and adding new furniture, were part of a statewide rejuvenation program implemented by former Gov. Thomas Kean and former Attorney General Cary Edwards, according to Division of Motor Vehicles spokesman Art Smith. Since 1986, the DMV has spent more than $5.7 million on the remodeling and expansion of 20 of the state's 52 local agencies.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | By Tamara Chuang and Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
An internal investigation into the local branch of the Division of Motor Vehicles has turned into a criminal case, and yesterday state police began searching for three former DMV employees charged with making false driver's licenses. The three clerks were charged Monday with tampering with public records, conspiracy and official misconduct, according to complaints filed with the Deptford Municipal Court Clerk. It was unclear what penalties the three might face, officials said, because the case could be moved up to Superior Court.
NEWS
April 1, 2003 | By Dave Boyer
The Division of Motor Vehicles owes me. We can quibble about the dollar value of my pain and suffering at the hands of the DMV. But any jury would agree that I have a case. And I want restitution for what the DMV made me endure unnecessarily. The DMV (motto: "You're in the wrong line") has announced that soon it will no longer require drivers with valid out-of-state licenses to take the written test to receive a New Jersey license. No longer will those 100,000 or so adults who move to New Jersey each year be forced to relive their teenage nightmares by cramming for a multiple-choice test.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The DMV. The initials alone strike fear into the hearts of New Jersey motorists. "When I left the motor-vehicle agency today I was shaking, frustrated, and I felt abused and violated. . . . I dread the next visit," one New Jersey resident wrote to a commission formed by Gov. McGreevey to improve the Division of Motor Vehicle Services. Yesterday, Transportation Commissioner James P. Fox released an interim report drafted by the Fix DMV Commission as a "first step" in the multiyear effort.
NEWS
January 24, 2003 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It isn't exactly what the McGreevey administration had sought, but a plan to repair New Jersey's sputtering Division of Motor Vehicle Services was delivered by the legislature yesterday. The amended version of the governor's "Fix DMV" proposal, passed by the Senate and Assembly, would create an eight-member commission to overhaul driver licensing and registration. Although Senate Republicans forced such changes as smaller increases in driver's fees and reductions in the commission's power, Gov. McGreevey is expected to sign the bill into law. The new Motor Vehicle Commission would replace the DMV and be responsible for bolstering customer service and security, which have come under sharp criticism, and reporting regularly to the legislature.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By George Will
From Mathew Brady's 1862 photo exhibit of "The Dead of Antietam" to the cameras that brought Vietnam into American living rooms, graphic journalism has exercised unique power to open minds and hence shape history. It may do so Tuesday when PBS broadcasts The Central Park Five , a meticulous narrative of a gross miscarriage of justice. There were abundant dystopian aspects of New York City in the 1980s, when crime, crack, and AIDS produced a perfect storm of anxiety about the fraying social fabric.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facebook is the biggest online social medium in the world. People love it, are uneasy with it, even a little suspicious. It just may have done something inarguably good, with immediate, measurable impact. So far, that seems to be the case with Facebook's new organ-donation push. On Tuesday, Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, announced that users can now choose to indicate to their Facebook world that they wish to be organ donors. And, if you choose, a link can whisk you right to your state's donor registry, where you can register online.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Liz Gormisky, Inquirer Staff Writer
The queues were long at PennDot's Center City motor vehicle office Wednesday as prospective voters lined up for free photo IDs, promised as part of a new state law requiring voters to show identification at the polls. A provision in the law, which takes effect for the November election, allows applicants to have the $13.50 ID fee waived if they sign an affidavit affirming that the card is only to be used for voting. Lying in that affidavit could bring a two-year prison term.
NEWS
September 19, 2010 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I just found out that Mother Mary has been living under an alias. You would think that I'd know my mother's real name. After all, she's 86, I'm 55, and it's the kind of thing that's generally well-established by now. But Mother Mary is full of mysteries. Let me explain. You may recall that I took her to the airport after her last visit, and she almost wasn't allowed to board the plane to Miami because her ID card had expired. The airline let her fly only because she was carrying her Social Security card.
NEWS
June 24, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Souderton's Montgomery Theater has chosen a quirky batch of plays this season, and its final offering, Ten Percent of Molly Snyder, is no exception. Richard Strand's examination of the nefarious control civil servants exert over our lives premiered at Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre in 2001. Small companies love to produce compact, direct pieces like this one: It requires one simple set, two actors, and very little time. Clocking in at just over an hour, Molly Snyder might have been paired by Montgomery with another one-act, if only to give the audience the full two-acts-with-intermission experience.
NEWS
January 17, 2008
In the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, the federal government adopted a plan to create a national, standardized, tamper-proof driver's license system. It may have sounded like a good idea at first, given that some of the terrorists used fake driver's licenses to board the planes that crashed into the World Trade Center. But a simple plan to link up computers among state motor-vehicle centers is expected to take nine years to complete, cost $4 billion to implement, and - oddly enough - could have the unintended effect of making Americans less secure.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
ANOTHER DAY, another scrape with the law for DMX. The 35-year-old rapper, whose real name is Earl Simmons, has again been charged with traffic infractions, this time after being pulled over in downtown White Plains, N.Y., Friday afternoon. He was stopped for driving his 2001 Chevy Suburban at unreasonable speeds and making unsafe lane changes, but once he was stopped, police found he was not wearing a seat belt and did not have a driver's license. He has to show up for court on June 16. You'd think he would have learned his lesson after serving 70 days in jail last year for violating his parole following a 2004 incident in which he posed as an undercover federal agent and crashed his sport utility vehicle through a security gate at Kennedy International Airport.
NEWS
April 16, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Bob Durbin remembers what going to the old New Jersey Division of Motor Vehicles was like. It was nothing like this. These days, the retiree from Lumberton noted, the place is organized. And the employees, well, they're actually helpful. "It's great. I can get in and out of here in five minutes, which I could never do before," Durbin said as he left the motor-vehicles office in Medford on a recent weekday afternoon after picking up paperwork for a replacement title. "They should have done this a long time ago. " Score one for the state's new and improved Motor Vehicle Commission.
NEWS
September 28, 2005 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eight people were charged yesterday in federal court in Newark, N.J., with running a scheme that provided thousands of illegal immigrants with Pennsylvania driver's licenses. The alleged ringleader, Altagracia "Grace" Rosario, 45, of Robbinsville, N.J., created fraudulent documents - often, fake Puerto Rican birth certificates - that immigrants then used at the Bensalem driver's license center, authorities said. Another defendant, Ronald Henry, 62, of Philadelphia, was an examiner in the Bensalem office.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Getting your driver's license at 16 used to be one of life's biggest milestones - a Holy Grail that practically guaranteed independence. It was a ritual that teens relished and parents dreaded. The months of nail-biting practice. The test with the scary DMV guy. The celebration with a carful of friends making so much noise that you couldn't remember what to do at a yield sign. Now, increasingly, it's just another chore that some would rather put off. Consider Alexis Degna, who sputtered along without a license until she was 21. She preferred taking the train or bumming rides to dealing with the morass of rules and regulations from the New Jersey Department of Motor Vehicles.
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