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Dna

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NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The coiled molecules of DNA in human cells carry a unique chemical code that can match a trace of blood, semen, skin or hair to the person who left it. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) carries its code in four characters denoted by the letters A,T, C, and G. But no microscope is powerful enough to see how this code is arranged on a given DNA molecule, so science must use more indirect methods to read it. Forensics laboratories use several different methods for determining whether two samples indeed carry identical stretches of code.
LIVING
July 3, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They seemed unlikely candidates to make one of the pivotal discoveries of the 20th century. Francis H.C. Crick was a 35-year-old Ph.D. candidate who had abandoned physics, hoping to find his niche in biology. James D. Watson was a gawky-looking 24-year-old who rarely bothered to tie his shoelaces. Both scientists were supposed to be working on other things, but they believed fervently that the most important scientific problem of their time was the mystery of inheritance - how everything from diseases to hair color to the very instructions to make a human being was passed on from generation to generation.
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man arrested recently in Puerto Rico for domestic offenses resembles the composite of the Fairmount Park rapist, city police said yesterday, adding that the suspect has lived in Philadelphia. As a result, the man, whose name was not released, has agreed to provide DNA that will be compared with evidence collected in the murder and rape of medical student Rebecca Park in Fairmount Park and the rape of another woman off Kelly Drive. The Fairmount Park assailant is also suspected of a third attack on the West River Drive in which the victim managed to fight off her attacker.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Pam Lobley
Do you have the feeling you're related to someone famous? Maybe it's an uncanny sense that Mozart was your ancestor. Or that Genghis Khan might be in your family tree. That affinity you feel for ancient Rome can't be an accident, can it? Touring the toppled ruins of columns and friezes in the ancient city stirs something in you. Perhaps one or your ancestors was one of those emperors, or perhaps just a Roman soldier. It's in your blood. Now, with a simple swab of your cheek and a few hundred dollars, you can find out. Commercial genetic genealogy is barely five years old, but already it is proving irresistible to many.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
In a narrow ruling June 3, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the DNA swabbing of people arrested in connection with serious crimes is legal. The Maryland attorney general praised DNA swabbing as the 21st-century equivalent of fingerprinting and said it would help solve crimes. No doubt. But the ruling represents yet another way our DNA is slipping beyond our control even as few standards exist for its use, storage, and destruction. The implications are laid out in Biotechnology in Our Lives , the latest book from the Council for Responsible Genetics, a Cambridge, Mass., nonprofit focused on the ethics of gene research and biotechnology.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's become the last, best hope of people charged with a crime: a DNA test that proves police have the wrong guy. Tell that to Antwon Watkins. The 16-year-old South Philadelphia High School junior was found guilty of simple assault by a Philadelphia Family Court judge April 28 despite negative DNA results, alibi witnesses, school attendance records, and having no prior arrests. It could have been worse. Watkins had been charged with aggravated assault on a police officer.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Meeri N. Kim, For The Inquirer
Imagine a document 25,000 words long - about 100 pages, double-spaced - with one small error. Within the text of our genetic code, a single change like this can lead to a life-threatening disease such as sickle-cell anemia or cystic fibrosis. Most of these single-gene disorders have no cure. But using a new technique, doctors may one day be able to correct the genetic typo by replacing a harmful mutation in the genome with healthy DNA. Introducing CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
POLICE yesterday announced the arrest of a man who allegedly raped a 40-year-old woman outside the Linc during an Oct. 5, 2008, Eagles-Redskins game. "It was obviously a real challenge for us because of the number of people in and around that stadium," Special Victims Unit Capt. John Darby said yesterday. "It's almost like finding a needle in a haystack. " Police said they arrested Tiaghgee Daughtry, 22, who lives in Tunkhannock, Pa., near Scranton, on Wednesday, for allegedly raping the woman on a bus during the game.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
No one really knows what happened to Phil Purcell's plane that day in September 1963 over Kontum, Vietnam. A relief pilot saw him turn his ancient B-26 back toward Da Nang. But he never arrived - plunging, instead, into the highlands below and vanishing beneath the oncoming tide of history. For three decades, as his bones and those of his crewmates moldered in Vietnam, as his children grew up and his wife remarried, the story of who he was lay locked in his body's DNA, like a song waiting to be heard.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Pearl Duncan
Why do visions of war and hacked, stub-limbed civilians from Africa fail to move us as much as the images of civilians under attack in other parts of the world? I contend that we - whites, blacks and blends - are less moved by images from Africa because we've lost the emotional connection with the branch of the African human family tree. Geneticists recently have published results that say we all share the same DNA with slight variations based on traumas and the places we've passed through, via our ancestors.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia District Attorney's office announced Friday that it has agreed to a new trial for Anthony Wright, now serving life in prison for the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old Nicetown woman. "We are committed in the District Attorney's office to giving everyone a fair trial," said Assistant District Attorney Mark Gilson, a veteran homicide prosecutor who in April was named head of the office's new Conviction Review Unit. Gilson said new DNA analysis techniques, which show that Wright's DNA was not on the body of Louise Talley, were "not available when we tried the case in 1993.
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
For more than two decades, Anthony Wright has insisted that he did not rape and kill 77-year-old Louise Talley in Nicetown. He was working construction at the time of her death, he has said, adding that his confession came only after coercion from police, who he says threatened him while he was handcuffed to a chair. And the bloodstained clothes that police removed from his house? Not his either, he has maintained. He has made these claims from behind bars, where he is serving a life sentence for the 1991 slaying.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christina Regusters was found guilty Friday of disguising herself in Muslim garb, kidnapping a kindergartner from a West Philadelphia school in broad daylight, taking her home, and sexually assaulting her. Prosecutors credited the 5-year-old victim for her help cracking the case - a "remarkable" girl, said Assistant District Attorney Erin O'Brien. She had ridden around West Philadelphia with detectives and spotted a wall she had remembered from her ordeal - which led police to her captor.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AFTER SPENDING nearly three weeks listening to a parade of witnesses testify about the brazen school abduction and brutal sexual assault of a 5-year-old girl, a Philadelphia jury today is set to begin deliberating the fate of the woman accused of committing the crime. Christina Regusters, 21, a college dropout and onetime day-care employee, was portrayed by a prosecutor in closing arguments yesterday as a sex fiend who disguised herself in Muslim garb and took the girl from school on the morning of Jan. 14, 2013, to emulate the sick child-porn scenes she viewed on her laptop earlier that morning.
NEWS
September 6, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Microscopic DNA particles on a worn, dirty black T-shirt have emerged at trial as the only physical link between alleged kidnapper Christina Regusters and the 5-year-old girl taken last year from a West Philadelphia school and sexually assaulted. That was the conclusion of a Philadelphia police DNA analyst who on Thursday described for a Common Pleas Court jury the results of his examination of objects taken from the West Philadelphia house where the child was allegedly held and assaulted.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A WEEK BEFORE she was arrested for allegedly kidnapping and sexually assaulting a 5-year-old girl, Christina Regusters didn't seem too nervous or upset, an FBI agent testified during her trial yesterday. On the contrary, Regusters joked a little, appeared immature at times and said some things that stood out, recalled FBI Special Agent Thomas Scanzano, who interviewed her Feb. 8, 2013. "To me, it was a very unemotional interview considering the facts of the case," he said, as Regusters, 21, busied herself shuffling legal papers while seated next to her lawyer.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
W AN AND Wei-Heng Shih, both 60, of Bryn Mawr, are co-founders of Lenima Field Diagnostics. Both are professors at Drexel and are developing piezoelectric-sensor technology that can detect a germ that causes diarrhea and is primarily responsible for 14,000 deaths in the U.S. each year, says the CDC. I spoke with Wan Shih. Q: How did you come up with the idea for this technology? A: We have a long history on working with piezoelectric materials that started in the 1990s.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
CALVIN GADSON, a Germantown man who robbed a teenage couple and raped the girl in 1998 but was not arrested until 2010 when DNA evidence linked him to the crimes, fought back tears yesterday after being sentenced to 32 1/2 to 65 years in state prison. "I'm not perfect," Gadson, 38, said before learning his fate from Common Pleas Judge Giovanni O. Campbell. "I just ask for a little bit of leniency so I can see my five children grow up. " But Gadson's children - who are ages 6 to 17 - will be long grown by the time he is eligible for parole.
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