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Dna

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NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The coiled molecules of DNA in human cells carry a unique chemical code that can match a trace of blood, semen, skin or hair to the person who left it. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) carries its code in four characters denoted by the letters A,T, C, and G. But no microscope is powerful enough to see how this code is arranged on a given DNA molecule, so science must use more indirect methods to read it. Forensics laboratories use several different methods for determining whether two samples indeed carry identical stretches of code.
LIVING
July 3, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They seemed unlikely candidates to make one of the pivotal discoveries of the 20th century. Francis H.C. Crick was a 35-year-old Ph.D. candidate who had abandoned physics, hoping to find his niche in biology. James D. Watson was a gawky-looking 24-year-old who rarely bothered to tie his shoelaces. Both scientists were supposed to be working on other things, but they believed fervently that the most important scientific problem of their time was the mystery of inheritance - how everything from diseases to hair color to the very instructions to make a human being was passed on from generation to generation.
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man arrested recently in Puerto Rico for domestic offenses resembles the composite of the Fairmount Park rapist, city police said yesterday, adding that the suspect has lived in Philadelphia. As a result, the man, whose name was not released, has agreed to provide DNA that will be compared with evidence collected in the murder and rape of medical student Rebecca Park in Fairmount Park and the rape of another woman off Kelly Drive. The Fairmount Park assailant is also suspected of a third attack on the West River Drive in which the victim managed to fight off her attacker.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Pam Lobley
Do you have the feeling you're related to someone famous? Maybe it's an uncanny sense that Mozart was your ancestor. Or that Genghis Khan might be in your family tree. That affinity you feel for ancient Rome can't be an accident, can it? Touring the toppled ruins of columns and friezes in the ancient city stirs something in you. Perhaps one or your ancestors was one of those emperors, or perhaps just a Roman soldier. It's in your blood. Now, with a simple swab of your cheek and a few hundred dollars, you can find out. Commercial genetic genealogy is barely five years old, but already it is proving irresistible to many.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
In a narrow ruling June 3, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the DNA swabbing of people arrested in connection with serious crimes is legal. The Maryland attorney general praised DNA swabbing as the 21st-century equivalent of fingerprinting and said it would help solve crimes. No doubt. But the ruling represents yet another way our DNA is slipping beyond our control even as few standards exist for its use, storage, and destruction. The implications are laid out in Biotechnology in Our Lives , the latest book from the Council for Responsible Genetics, a Cambridge, Mass., nonprofit focused on the ethics of gene research and biotechnology.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
POLICE yesterday announced the arrest of a man who allegedly raped a 40-year-old woman outside the Linc during an Oct. 5, 2008, Eagles-Redskins game. "It was obviously a real challenge for us because of the number of people in and around that stadium," Special Victims Unit Capt. John Darby said yesterday. "It's almost like finding a needle in a haystack. " Police said they arrested Tiaghgee Daughtry, 22, who lives in Tunkhannock, Pa., near Scranton, on Wednesday, for allegedly raping the woman on a bus during the game.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
No one really knows what happened to Phil Purcell's plane that day in September 1963 over Kontum, Vietnam. A relief pilot saw him turn his ancient B-26 back toward Da Nang. But he never arrived - plunging, instead, into the highlands below and vanishing beneath the oncoming tide of history. For three decades, as his bones and those of his crewmates moldered in Vietnam, as his children grew up and his wife remarried, the story of who he was lay locked in his body's DNA, like a song waiting to be heard.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Pearl Duncan
Why do visions of war and hacked, stub-limbed civilians from Africa fail to move us as much as the images of civilians under attack in other parts of the world? I contend that we - whites, blacks and blends - are less moved by images from Africa because we've lost the emotional connection with the branch of the African human family tree. Geneticists recently have published results that say we all share the same DNA with slight variations based on traumas and the places we've passed through, via our ancestors.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
For 41 years, the boy in the box has rested in his pauper's grave - unidentified, his murder unsolved. Yesterday, in a final attempt to find his killer, police removed him from his solitary grave in a potter's field in Northeast Philadelphia. They took his body to the medical examiner's office, where technicians will try to extract DNA from his remains. They hope such evidence will help identify him and eventually help nail his killer. "It's hard but it's been done before," said Lt. Ken Coluzzi, head of the special investigations unit at the police Homicide Division.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Meeri N. Kim, For The Inquirer
Imagine a document 25,000 words long - about 100 pages, double-spaced - with one small error. Within the text of our genetic code, a single change like this can lead to a life-threatening disease such as sickle-cell anemia or cystic fibrosis. Most of these single-gene disorders have no cure. But using a new technique, doctors may one day be able to correct the genetic typo by replacing a harmful mutation in the genome with healthy DNA. Introducing CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Kareem Johnson killed Walter Smith outside a North Philadelphia nightclub, prosecutors said, he shot him at such close range that Smith's blood splashed onto Johnson's red Air Jordan baseball cap. That cap helped convict him. "That hat that was left at the scene in the middle of the street has Kareem Johnson's sweat on it and has Walter Smith's blood on it," Assistant District Attorney Michael Barry told jurors. "DNA is a witness. It is a silent, unflappable witness. " But he was wrong.
NEWS
July 23, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials from West Chester - both the university and the borough - are betting on something scientific to help ward off the divisions that have separated communities grappling with the resurgent issue of race. They are looking to DNA. In a new initiative called "One University, One Ancestry," the school will offer DNA testing to students, staff, faculty, and community members. They hope it will not only give participants insight into the origins of their ancestors, but awaken them to shared experiences and backgrounds revealed by a closer look at the gene pool.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2015 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
For centuries, dog lovers have been asking their pooches to sit and stay. These days, more owners are adding: Who's your daddy? The increasing options to administer DNA tests for dogs (and to a lesser extent, cats) answers the call of curiosity, sure, but the tests that reveal your mutt's family tree also can help vets better diagnose disease and manage lifestyle issues like exercise, diet, and behavior problems. At the very least, the tests - now more accurate than the ones first introduced to consumers about eight years ago - allow owners to know how big the dog they adopted at six months likely will be at six years.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
An expert medical panel has endorsed using a DNA test as an alternative, not just an add-on, to the venerable Pap smear for cervical cancer screening. But the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which had a representative on the panel, says the new screening approach is premature. The ob/guns' group continues to recommend either Pap smears or "co-testing" using the Pap and DNA tests. The DNA test, called cobas and made by Roche, detects two strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV)
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The investigation into a series of rapes in Pennypack Park was years old, and still open, when a man named Robert Palen was arrested in Wisconsin late last year. The 38-year-old, born and raised in Philadelphia, had lived near the park, where three women said they had been abducted, beaten, and raped by a man driving a white work van, in 2010 and 2011. But DNA evidence - found in just one of the cases - never turned up a match, and the trail had grown cold by December 2013, when Palen was arrested and accused of beating, strangling, and raping a Madison, Wis., woman in her home.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peter H. Sellers, 84, of Philadelphia, one of the early pioneers of DNA research, died Saturday, Nov. 15, of cancer at home. Dr. Sellers was the ninth generation of Philadelphia's first family of scientists and engineers, according to D. Vitiello, writing in Engineering Philadelphia, published by Cornell University Press in 2014. Beginning in 1966, Dr. Sellers spent 48 years as a senior research scientist at Rockefeller University. The university called him "a brilliant and pioneering mathematician whose [work]
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  A Bucks County man has been charged with arson and vandalism for allegedly burning American flags, veterans' flag holders, and other gravesite decorations at two cemeteries in August and September, according to police. Anthony Davis Carter, 29, of Feasterville, is accused of collecting the items at gravesites, tossing them into a pile, then setting them ablaze. Police say he did it five times in about a month, at Roosevelt Memorial Park and Rosedale Memorial Park, and that the acts left some gravemarkers damaged as well.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
A "Jeopardy" answer: The word for the plastic tip of a shoelace. Question: What is an aglet? A medical jeopardy answer: The word for the DNA at the ends of chromosomes. Question: What is telomere?   In my office at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children last month, I saw a small 9-year-old boy for a checkup before fourth grade. His single mother was concerned that a child was repeatedly bullying him at school.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office announced Friday that it had agreed to a new trial for Anthony Wright, now serving life in prison for the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old Nicetown woman. "We are committed in the District Attorney's Office to giving everyone a fair trial," said Assistant District Attorney Mark Gilson, a veteran homicide prosecutor who in April was named head of the office's new Conviction Review Unit. Gilson said new DNA analysis techniques, which show that Wright's DNA was not on the body of Louise Talley, were "not available when we tried the case in 1993.
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