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Dna

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NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The coiled molecules of DNA in human cells carry a unique chemical code that can match a trace of blood, semen, skin or hair to the person who left it. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) carries its code in four characters denoted by the letters A,T, C, and G. But no microscope is powerful enough to see how this code is arranged on a given DNA molecule, so science must use more indirect methods to read it. Forensics laboratories use several different methods for determining whether two samples indeed carry identical stretches of code.
LIVING
July 3, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They seemed unlikely candidates to make one of the pivotal discoveries of the 20th century. Francis H.C. Crick was a 35-year-old Ph.D. candidate who had abandoned physics, hoping to find his niche in biology. James D. Watson was a gawky-looking 24-year-old who rarely bothered to tie his shoelaces. Both scientists were supposed to be working on other things, but they believed fervently that the most important scientific problem of their time was the mystery of inheritance - how everything from diseases to hair color to the very instructions to make a human being was passed on from generation to generation.
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man arrested recently in Puerto Rico for domestic offenses resembles the composite of the Fairmount Park rapist, city police said yesterday, adding that the suspect has lived in Philadelphia. As a result, the man, whose name was not released, has agreed to provide DNA that will be compared with evidence collected in the murder and rape of medical student Rebecca Park in Fairmount Park and the rape of another woman off Kelly Drive. The Fairmount Park assailant is also suspected of a third attack on the West River Drive in which the victim managed to fight off her attacker.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Pam Lobley
Do you have the feeling you're related to someone famous? Maybe it's an uncanny sense that Mozart was your ancestor. Or that Genghis Khan might be in your family tree. That affinity you feel for ancient Rome can't be an accident, can it? Touring the toppled ruins of columns and friezes in the ancient city stirs something in you. Perhaps one or your ancestors was one of those emperors, or perhaps just a Roman soldier. It's in your blood. Now, with a simple swab of your cheek and a few hundred dollars, you can find out. Commercial genetic genealogy is barely five years old, but already it is proving irresistible to many.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
In a narrow ruling June 3, the U.S. Supreme Court declared that the DNA swabbing of people arrested in connection with serious crimes is legal. The Maryland attorney general praised DNA swabbing as the 21st-century equivalent of fingerprinting and said it would help solve crimes. No doubt. But the ruling represents yet another way our DNA is slipping beyond our control even as few standards exist for its use, storage, and destruction. The implications are laid out in Biotechnology in Our Lives , the latest book from the Council for Responsible Genetics, a Cambridge, Mass., nonprofit focused on the ethics of gene research and biotechnology.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
POLICE yesterday announced the arrest of a man who allegedly raped a 40-year-old woman outside the Linc during an Oct. 5, 2008, Eagles-Redskins game. "It was obviously a real challenge for us because of the number of people in and around that stadium," Special Victims Unit Capt. John Darby said yesterday. "It's almost like finding a needle in a haystack. " Police said they arrested Tiaghgee Daughtry, 22, who lives in Tunkhannock, Pa., near Scranton, on Wednesday, for allegedly raping the woman on a bus during the game.
NEWS
December 26, 1996 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
No one really knows what happened to Phil Purcell's plane that day in September 1963 over Kontum, Vietnam. A relief pilot saw him turn his ancient B-26 back toward Da Nang. But he never arrived - plunging, instead, into the highlands below and vanishing beneath the oncoming tide of history. For three decades, as his bones and those of his crewmates moldered in Vietnam, as his children grew up and his wife remarried, the story of who he was lay locked in his body's DNA, like a song waiting to be heard.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Pearl Duncan
Why do visions of war and hacked, stub-limbed civilians from Africa fail to move us as much as the images of civilians under attack in other parts of the world? I contend that we - whites, blacks and blends - are less moved by images from Africa because we've lost the emotional connection with the branch of the African human family tree. Geneticists recently have published results that say we all share the same DNA with slight variations based on traumas and the places we've passed through, via our ancestors.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
For 41 years, the boy in the box has rested in his pauper's grave - unidentified, his murder unsolved. Yesterday, in a final attempt to find his killer, police removed him from his solitary grave in a potter's field in Northeast Philadelphia. They took his body to the medical examiner's office, where technicians will try to extract DNA from his remains. They hope such evidence will help identify him and eventually help nail his killer. "It's hard but it's been done before," said Lt. Ken Coluzzi, head of the special investigations unit at the police Homicide Division.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SOMETIMES criminals evade detection by police and the media, even when they commit a series of savage assaults. That was the case with Matthew Jones, 30, who pleaded guilty in July to raping and battering four women in Frankford between May 2007 and his arrest in August 2012. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Donna Woelpper sentenced Jones to 35 to 100 years in state prison, noting the violence he had inflicted on his victims and calling him a danger to society and a poor candidate for rehabilitation.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SOMETIMES criminals evade detection by police and the media, even when they commit a series of savage assaults. That was the case with Matthew Jones, 30, who pleaded guilty in July to raping and battering four women in Frankford between May 2007 and his arrest in August 2012. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Donna Woelpper sentenced Jones to 35 to 100 years in state prison, noting the violence he had inflicted on his victims and calling him a danger to society and a poor candidate for rehabilitation.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Hours before dawn on March 17, 1989, a man peered into an abandoned Oldsmobile in a North Philadelphia lot and saw a body. Police identified the deceased as 19-year-old Ruby Ellis of the 2500 block of West Girard Avenue. A brief news item in The Inquirer the next day reported that she had been strangled, that she was wearing only a jacket, and that she had been dead for several hours when she was found in the car at 15th and Flora Streets. Five weeks later, The Inquirer ran an item on another strangling: Cheryl Hanible, 33, of Southwest Philadelphia, found inside a burned-out, vacant bar on Girard, blocks from the site of the March 17 slaying.
NEWS
March 21, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LONG DORMANT hopes for justice were revived for two families yesterday, nearly three decades after two young women were slain weeks apart in North Philadelphia. Police arrested Rudolph Churchill, 51, early yesterday at a home on Fairmount Avenue near Ridge, not far from where Ruby Ellis and Cheryl Hanible were slain in spring 1989. He was charged with two counts of murder in those incidents. If not for decades-old DNA evidence, Churchill would still be free. "It's a great feeling, when you can put a case together in terms of getting that missing link, and bringing some sense of closure to the victim's family," police spokesman Lt. John Stanford said last night.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Jackson not the dad? Claims that Michael Jackson fathered a 31-year-old man named Brandon Howard are untrue, says TMZ. This week, Alki David , founder of FilmOn.com, said he had obtained DNA evidence that proved MJ's paternity. Turns out the lab that supposedly carried out the test is fake. The results are printed on paper that bears the same company logo as the fictional DNA testing lab in the sci-fi pic Terminator Salvation ! David on Friday told TMZ the test is real, and he said the lab added the logo design to make their printouts more photogenic.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
IT TOOK 16 years and a little bit of DNA for a Philadelphia jury yesterday to find Calvin Gadson guilty of raping a 15-year-old girl and robbing her and her boyfriend. The couple - who are now married - testified last week that they were ambushed by two gunmen and forced into Reyburn Park in North Philadelphia just after midnight Feb. 1, 1998. It was there that the gunmen took turns sexually assaulting the girl and holding her boyfriend at gunpoint, according to the couple, whom the Daily News is not identifying.
NEWS
January 21, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
IT'S NO RABBIT, but what two area police departments were able to pull out of a hat surely has one alleged criminal scratching his head. Thanks to DNA and a collaborative effort between Upper Darby and Philadelphia police, DNA on a hat left behind at the scene of a shooting almost four years ago has led to the arrest of Tyric Shaw, one of two alleged gunmen in the case. On Aug. 20, 2010, two men robbed two other men at gunpoint on Aberdeen Road near Guilford in Upper Darby. One victim was robbed of his cellphone, $7 in cash and a condom before he took off running, Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood said.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
YOU'VE heard of stop and frisk, the highly controversial and often unconstitutionally applied tactic wherein police search people without evidence of wrongdoing. The Pennsylvania Legislature is now considering another category of unreasonable search and seizure: stop and swab. A bill pending in the House would allow police to collect DNA evidence from people who are arrested for felonies and certain misdemeanors by swabbing their cheeks when they're booked. It expands current law, which allows DNA evidence to be collected only after people are convicted of certain crimes.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Many people think that when they buy supplements in a drugstore, the products are as well tested as pharmaceuticals and contain the compounds they claim to. But a recent study shows once again that substitutions and quality problems are common. And experts point out that many supplements do not help even at the correct doses. Canadian researchers tested 44 herbal products from 12 companies, and found that over half (59 percent) contained plants not listed on the labels. One-third contained contaminants and/or fillers, some of which could pose health risks.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Information is like turkey and stuffing. It's hard to tell when you've had enough. And the more you get, the more you want. At least that's how I feel. I'm bad at portion control, whether it's Thanksgiving dinner or information. Obviously, I don't believe there's such a thing as too much information. If you read this column, you know about my bunions, fleas, cellulite, and Mother Mary. One of these is to be avoided at all costs. Not the one you think. FYI, I love information.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Reynaldo Torres had been missing for more than 500 days when his sister answered the phone Saturday morning. For more than a year, Melissa Ruiz had held out hope her older brother was still alive, even as police found the body of the woman he disappeared with, even as both cases languished, unsolved, for months. Then came an unlikely break in the case: In October, Ruiz learned that a homicide detective already under investigation for allegedly covering up one killing was suspected of concealing information in her brother's case.
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