CollectionsDna Fingerprinting
IN THE NEWS

Dna Fingerprinting

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Following the lead of more than two dozen states, 39 New Jersey lawmakers are supporting a proposal that would require sex offenders to submit blood samples for DNA profiling. The measure would force convicted sex offenders to give samples of their blood to the state police. The information would then be entered into a national DNA database used by local, state and federal law enforcement agencies for criminal investigations, much as electronic images of fingerprints are used today.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A new "DNA fingerprinting" process has matched bloodstains from serial- murder suspect Steven B. Pennell's van with the blood of one of his alleged victims, a Maryland scientist testified yesterday. Jurors got a crash course in molecular biology during testimony by Robin Cotton, research manager at Cellmark Diagnostics of Germantown, Md., as Pennell's trial entered its sixth week in Delaware Superior Court. Cotton explained how the relatively untried DNA fingerprinting process, developed about a year ago, was used to match a bloody rug taken from Pennell's van with the blood of Catherine A. DiMauro.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Maryland laboratory chosen to do DNA testing on the undergarments of a 1981 rape-murder victim may not have the proper technology to determine whether semen stains on the clothing belong to Nicholas Yarris, the man sentenced to death for the crime, according to a forensic scientist familiar with the case. Given the age and condition of the semen sample, forensic scientist Edward Blake said, successful analysis is far more likely using a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Serial-murder suspect Steven B. Pennell will go on trial in Delaware Superior Court today to face charges that he kidnapped, mutilated and murdered three Delaware women between 1987 and 1988. Authorities expect the two- to three-month trial of Pennell, a 31-year-old electrician and father of two from Glasgow, Del., to be one of the longest and most complex in Delaware history. State Deputy Attorneys General Kathleen Jennings and Peter Letang plan to question 100 witnesses.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
A Maryland laboratory chosen to do DNA testing in a Delaware County rape- murder case has failed to determine whether semen stains on the victim's clothing belong to the man sentenced to death row for the killing. Nicholas Yarris, 31, was convicted of the December 1981 murder of Linda May Craig, a 32-year-old mother of three. Yarris was granted court approval in 1989 to have Craig's undergarments tested at Cellmark Diagnostics of Germantown, Md. Cellmark conducted "DNA fingerprinting," a process that compares a suspect's basic genetic material - DNA - with the genetic material in blood or semen that may be found at crime scenes.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | By JACK McGUIRE, Daily News Staff Writer
There was a day when a criminal could feel fairly safe in leaving the scene of the crime by simply wiping away telltale fingerprints. But that was before the age of high-tech crime detection. Pretty soon, even the tiniest bit of a crook's body will be enough to link him or her to the crime. That means blood, sweat and tears, semen, a scrape of skin, a single hair - anything with a genetic fingerprint on it. Civil libertarians and defense lawyers are worried. But police and prosecutors are looking ahead to an easier time bringing the guilty to justice - not to mention conclusively clearing the innocent.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | By Lyn A.E. McCafferty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
DNA fingerprinting, generally used to cement the identification of the guilty, may prove to be the salvation of a Chester man accused of raping a blind woman. Harold Belgrave, 29, of the 2200 block of Crosby Street, was released late Thursday from Delaware County Prison after the District Attorney's Office received genetic test results in the case. "The DNA fingerprinting indicates it was not the defendant's semen found on the victim's blue robe," District Attorney William H. Ryan Jr. said yesterday.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | by Jim Tranquada, Los Angeles Daily News
Two months ago, two prominent scientists who have been vocal opponents in the battle over the use of DNA testing in court jointly announced in a respected scientific journal that "the DNA fingerprinting wars are over. " But no peace yet has been declared in the courtroom of Judge Lance Ito, who, beginning tomorrow, will preside over what could be a long and hard- fought hearing over DNA tests in the O.J. Simpson trial. Confronted with conflicting appellate court decisions, teams of clashing experts and massive motions detailing the eye-glazing technicalities, Ito must decide whether the results of DNA tests on blood taken from the crime scene and Simpson's estate and car can be presented to the jury.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
DNA fingerprinting techniques are accurate and should be accepted as evidence in court, U.S. geneticists said yesterday. They pointed in particular to the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial, in which court debates about the admissibility of DNA evidence have made daily headlines. The latest procedures and standards are reliable and, if anything, give an advantage to defendants, Eric Lander of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., and Bruce Budowle of the Federal Bureau of Investigation wrote in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
INFANT MONITORS Watch out, parents - those infant monitors that let you listen to your kids from across the house may be broadcasting your most private affairs throughout the neighborhood. Radio-scanner enthusiasts with reasonably good roof antennas can pick up the signals up to half a mile away. And Monitoring Times, a magazine for scanner buffs, recently published the monitors' frequencies. DIET TIPS If you have an overactive sweet tooth, keep up your intake of chromium.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 30, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
By comparing DNA samples from hundreds of volunteers, a Penn anthropologist and his colleagues have tied Native Americans to a group of people living in a small region of Russia called the Altai, near the borders of Mongolia, China, and Kazakstan. The results, published in Friday's issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics, add another chapter to the story of the settlement of the Americas. Increasingly efficient DNA technology is helping scientists flesh out the prehistory of the Native Americans and of the human race in general.
NEWS
May 16, 2008 | By Adrienne Lu INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A panel of New Jersey lawmakers yesterday approved a bill that would require people found guilty of "disorderly persons offenses," including shoplifting and vandalism, to give saliva samples to the state's DNA database of criminal offenders. The bill cleared the Senate Law and Public Safety and Veterans' Affairs Committee by a unanimous vote and now moves to the full Senate. The Assembly has yet to hear it. In New Jersey, disorderly conduct applies to a broad range of offenses that don't qualify as crimes under the state constitution.
NEWS
March 27, 2008 | By Faye Flam and Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
And you thought pregnancy tests and condoms made for embarrassing drugstore purchases. Now you can buy a paternity test at any of 4,363 Rite Aid drugstores, thus exposing your suspicious mind or perhaps your cheating heart to the person on the other side of the counter. The tests, marketed by Utah-based Identigene, employs a DNA fingerprinting technique similar to those used to solve crimes. They were introduced in Rite Aid stores on the West Coast last fall, and after 10,000 of them flew from the shelves, the company decided to market them in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and 27 other states, plus Washington, D.C. For millennia, uncertainty over paternity has shaped mores, allowing some men to escape the burden of child care and helping women cheat without detection.
NEWS
February 8, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mug shot. Fingerprints. Oral swab. It's not yet on the books, but New Jersey State Police technicians are gearing up for the day when DNA could be collected upon arrest for certain types of crimes. Already, five states and the federal government gather these samples, and - while not without detractors - the tactic has proved an effective law enforcement weapon in an age when DNA has the power to free a felon from death row. "I feel that the more DNA we collect, the better off we are," said New Jersey State Sen. Nicholas J. Sacco (D., Bergen)
NEWS
March 2, 2003 | By Katherine Ramsland
Friday was the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the structure of DNA. Scientists JamesWatson, Francis Crick and MauriceWilkins shared the 1962 Nobel Prize for the feat, which has led to a new era of innovation and uncertainty. Here four eminent experts consider the impact of DNA and genomic technologies on ethics, future medical and scientific research, crime investigation, and legislative priorities in Washington. For crime investigation, DNA technology has been the most revolutionary discovery since fingerprinting, and it's only getting better.
NEWS
October 1, 2001 | By Robert S. Boyd INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A tiny sliver of DNA on a hairbrush, a baby tooth saved by a mother, or a spot of dried blood stored in a hospital file may bring some measure of comfort to grieving relatives of people lost in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Scientists at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology DNA Identification Laboratory here are extracting DNA - the genetic code stored in almost every human cell - from body parts recovered from the Pentagon and the United Airlines Flight 93 crash site in Western Pennsylvania.
LIVING
August 4, 1997 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is the dominant form of life on Earth, with the longest history and greatest impact on the fate of all other living things. No, not humans; we're talking about the tiny microbe. For those who find that difficult to believe, consider this: Microbes have been around for 3.7 billion years. Humans checked in a mere 400,000 years ago. Microbes can live in hostile environments - such as polar ice, boiling volcanic water, and rocks deep beneath the surface - where other organisms would shrivel and die. Without microbes, dead matter wouldn't decay, soil wouldn't remain fertile.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | by Jim Tranquada, Los Angeles Daily News
Two months ago, two prominent scientists who have been vocal opponents in the battle over the use of DNA testing in court jointly announced in a respected scientific journal that "the DNA fingerprinting wars are over. " But no peace yet has been declared in the courtroom of Judge Lance Ito, who, beginning tomorrow, will preside over what could be a long and hard- fought hearing over DNA tests in the O.J. Simpson trial. Confronted with conflicting appellate court decisions, teams of clashing experts and massive motions detailing the eye-glazing technicalities, Ito must decide whether the results of DNA tests on blood taken from the crime scene and Simpson's estate and car can be presented to the jury.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
DNA fingerprinting techniques are accurate and should be accepted as evidence in court, U.S. geneticists said yesterday. They pointed in particular to the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial, in which court debates about the admissibility of DNA evidence have made daily headlines. The latest procedures and standards are reliable and, if anything, give an advantage to defendants, Eric Lander of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., and Bruce Budowle of the Federal Bureau of Investigation wrote in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
September 28, 1994 | by Shaun D. Mullen, Daily News Staff Writer
In another unusual twist in a case already full of them, the precedent- setting 1989 trial of a woman convicted of murdering a man at a Southern California hamburger stand may have a major bearing on the O.J. Simpson trial. There were in essence two trials in that case, the first in California in which DNA fingerprinting was successfully used: One in which the reliability of DNA testing was put on trial and the murder trial itself. The first proceeding, which has come to be known as a "Kelly Frye Hearing," will take center stage today in the Simpson trial when prosecutor Marcia Clark argues that jury selection should be delayed until the hearing on admissibility of DNA evidence can be held.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|