CollectionsDocumentary
IN THE NEWS

Documentary

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The filmmakers ask Richard Norcross to pull over at the house where he was shot five times - the house where his younger brother and another law enforcement officer were gunned down 20 years ago. "It's a very eerie feeling," says Norcross, who was a Haddon Heights police detective when Leslie Nelson's bloody rampage made national headlines. Glancing at the innocuous two-story dwelling on Sylvan Drive where his life changed forever on April 20, 1995, Norcross adds, "There are no good memories here.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A startling and experimental documentary on the order of The Thin Blue Line, James Benning's Used Innocence enjoys its local premiere tonight at Doylestown's James-Lorah House Auditorium. Not even the convicted murderer can solve this murder mystery. Tonight, 7:30, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. CLOSELY WATCHED FILMS James-Lorah House Auditorium, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. Phone: 345-5663 or 297-8517. Tonight 7:30: Used Innocence, James Benning's structuralist documentary, in which the filmmaker becomes personally involved with the film's subject, a convicted murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW YORK had Max's Kansas City and CBGB's. Los Angeles boasted the Roxy. Liverpool, England, had its Cavern Club. Here in Philadelphia, the pre-eminent rock 'n' roll club for many moons was J.C. Dobbs, a long chute of a room and hangout on the "hippest street in town," a/k/a lower South Street. Hot and happening from 1975 to 1996, Dobbs was the place where local heroes such as Wilmington's George Thorogood and Robert Hazard were discovered, where bands like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Oasis, Green Day and Rage Against the Machine kick-started a buzz, and solo talents like Sarah McLachlan and Beck first faced and conquered a Philly contingent.
SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
RORY KARPF didn't have any trouble coming up with the title for the ESPN "30 for 30" documentary he directed that airs on Selection Sunday at 9 p.m. "I Hate Christian Laettner" is the title of a film about the former Duke player who despite hitting "the shot" went on to become villified by people he never met. "They wanted to do this one on Christian," said Karpf, who has also done the "Book of Manning" and "Snoop & Son, A Dad's Dream" for...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
50 CHILDREN: THE RESCUE MISSION OF MR. AND MRS. KRAUS. 9 p.m. Monday, HBO. EVERY SO OFTEN, a documentary comes along with a story so good, it's easy to imagine it as a feature film. "50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus," which premieres on HBO on Monday to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day, is one such documentary: It has the characters, the plot points, and most importantly, it has the goose bumps. Which makes it all the more remarkable that the story of Philadelphians Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus, who left their own two children behind to rescue 50 Jewish children from Nazi Europe, wasn't much talked about until recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Abril family hover over their father, who is being kept alive by a respirator. "It's in our hands," says a son, "whether he will live or not. " "It's over, right?" asks another son, his question more of a plea. "It's over, right? There's nothing we can do for him?" "If we remove the respirator, it will seem like we are killing him," anguishes a daughter. "We will be burdened by guilty feelings, that we took him off. " The anguish of the Abril family comes at the beginning of a powerful and timely one-hour documentary airing at 10 tonight on Channel 12. WHOSE Death Is It, Anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - One year ago, after putting in a full day of work at her local department store, Betsy DelValley got home and pulled out her video camera. It was July 24, 2010, the day YouTube launched an experimental project asking users of the social-media site worldwide to submit videos about what transpired in their lives over 24 hours. The best submissions would be culled together for a documentary film. DelValley, then 19, was intrigued by the undertaking. The problem was, nothing all that exciting had transpired on the day she was meant to film.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
BACK IN THE DAY, when major league baseball resembled a half-vast plantation and teams owned players forever and a day, the Cardinals traded centerfielder Curt Flood to the Phillies. It was October 1969 and Flood got the news from the publicity guy, so far down the chain of command he rattled when he walked. Flood said, hell no, he won't go. What he actually said was, "In the history of man, there's no other profession except slavery where one man is tied to one owner for the rest of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
WHILE Melissa Fitzgerald was in northern Uganda filming her documentary "Staging Hope," a teenager came up to her and asked for one thing: "Don't let us die in these camps," the youth said. "Don't forget about us. " His appeal is repeated several times throughout "Staging Hope. " Through the documentary, Fitzgerald - who grew up in Chestnut Hill and graduated from Springside School and the University of Pennsylvania - hopes to inform the U.S. about the plight of northern Uganda and keep the conversation about humanitarian efforts alive.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Temple University players LaMont Ferrell and Darrin Pearsall just wanted their former basketball coach to say yes . . . to a documentary . . . about his life . . . for television. But the coach in question was John Chaney. The answer - not surprising - was a repeated and defiant "No!" So Ferrell and Pearsall, once high school basketball stars and rivals, staged an intervention. They gathered 10 of Chaney's former players to convince the 82-year-old Hall of Fame coach that not only was his life worth the effort, but, more important, the filmmakers wouldn't get on his nerves.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone with a Twitter feed will be aware of Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief , even if not by name. For some time, promoted tweets have filled feeds in an attempt to discredit individuals who appear in Going Clear , the documentary that debuts at 8 p.m. Sunday on HBO. The tweets don't mention Alex Gibney's documentary by name, but these paid-for missives accuse ex-Scientologists of being liars, seemingly without context....
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
TO STOP bullying, we have to understand the issues that cause bullies to act out in the first place. That's why director Amy S. Weber explores a bully's perspective in her film "A Girl Like Her," which opens today. "We hear so many of the stories from the victim's perspective, and we wanted to offer another side of the story - a story that we very rarely, if ever, get to hear," Weber said. Weber has written and produced more than 40 award-winning educational documentaries, in which she's explored tough topics facing youth, such as violence and eating disorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015
ABOUT a month ago, I watched the investigative reporter Edward R. Murrow's 1960 CBS documentary, "Harvest of Shame," which brought me to tears. Unprecedented in its day, the award-winning documentary aired on Thanksgiving and put up a mirror showing what poverty and the plight of farmworkers looked like, not in a third-world country, but right here at home. From the opening scene, I was riveted. It looked like an open lot for livestock and it was packed with African-American men and women looking for work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
AUSTIN, Texas - Here at the Interactive/Film week of South by Southwest, the question arises: Is it possible to own too many pairs of shoes? The title characters of Sneakerheadz , David T. Friendly and Mick Partridge's lively, pop-cult-savvy documentary about sneaker collectors, would agree with Imelda Marcos that it is not. With appearances by sneaker obsessives including rapper Wale, comedian Mike Epps, and DJs Samantha Ronson and...
SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
RORY KARPF didn't have any trouble coming up with the title for the ESPN "30 for 30" documentary he directed that airs on Selection Sunday at 9 p.m. "I Hate Christian Laettner" is the title of a film about the former Duke player who despite hitting "the shot" went on to become villified by people he never met. "They wanted to do this one on Christian," said Karpf, who has also done the "Book of Manning" and "Snoop & Son, A Dad's Dream" for...
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The filmmakers ask Richard Norcross to pull over at the house where he was shot five times - the house where his younger brother and another law enforcement officer were gunned down 20 years ago. "It's a very eerie feeling," says Norcross, who was a Haddon Heights police detective when Leslie Nelson's bloody rampage made national headlines. Glancing at the innocuous two-story dwelling on Sylvan Drive where his life changed forever on April 20, 1995, Norcross adds, "There are no good memories here.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Founded in 1835, St. Patrick's Church in Norristown is where many of the Irish immigrants who built the region's railroads worshiped and rejoiced amid the skirl of bagpipes. Fast-forward almost two centuries, and many St. Patrick's worshipers are speaking Spanish, with mariachi trumpets in the air. Starting about a decade ago, 1,000 to 1,500 Mexican immigrant families from the borough's burgeoning Hispanic population joined the church, spurring diversity with bilingual Masses and bringing vitality to a parish that 25 years ago closed its school because it couldn't draw enough students.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
TIMED to Black History Month, the Smithsonian Channel's new documentary "Legend of Lead Belly" (8 p.m. Monday) sheds lots of light on one of the least-known yet most colorful and influential musicians of the 20th century, an artist "who didn't limit himself to any genre," according to disciple Van Morrison in the show. "House of the Rising Sun" may have been popularized by the Animals, but Huddie Ledbetter (a/k/a Lead Belly) lived it as the "house" musician at a Shreveport, La., bordello.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
When she first walked through the maze of cubicles at the National Veterans Crisis Line in the winter of 2012, Ellen Goosenberg Kent thought she knew what to expect. Goosenberg Kent grew up in Philadelphia during the Vietnam era, the daughter of a Marine who had served in World War II. An Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker, she had already made two films about soldiers coping with broken bodies and spirits after returning home from war. This latest project, however, exploring the inner workings of the nation's suicide help line for veterans, surprised her and the film's producer, Dana Perry.
NEWS
January 21, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Rowan University senior Christopher Holzschuh hadn't heard his grandfather's entire World War II story until he made a documentary about it. "I didn't think of him as a war hero," said Holzschuh, 22, a history major from Marlton. "It was a side to my grandfather I don't think I ever saw. " The powerful 20-minute film, Change of Tides , was shown publicly for the first time Friday at the DIY arts space in downtown Flemington, N.J., and Holzschuh and his three Rowan collaborators were on hand.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|