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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A startling and experimental documentary on the order of The Thin Blue Line, James Benning's Used Innocence enjoys its local premiere tonight at Doylestown's James-Lorah House Auditorium. Not even the convicted murderer can solve this murder mystery. Tonight, 7:30, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. CLOSELY WATCHED FILMS James-Lorah House Auditorium, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. Phone: 345-5663 or 297-8517. Tonight 7:30: Used Innocence, James Benning's structuralist documentary, in which the filmmaker becomes personally involved with the film's subject, a convicted murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW YORK had Max's Kansas City and CBGB's. Los Angeles boasted the Roxy. Liverpool, England, had its Cavern Club. Here in Philadelphia, the pre-eminent rock 'n' roll club for many moons was J.C. Dobbs, a long chute of a room and hangout on the "hippest street in town," a/k/a lower South Street. Hot and happening from 1975 to 1996, Dobbs was the place where local heroes such as Wilmington's George Thorogood and Robert Hazard were discovered, where bands like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Oasis, Green Day and Rage Against the Machine kick-started a buzz, and solo talents like Sarah McLachlan and Beck first faced and conquered a Philly contingent.
SPORTS
December 28, 2015 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
According to the Huffington Post, an investigative documentary by Al Jazeera alleges that Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard and other prominent professional athletes received human growth hormones from a Texas-based pharmacist. The Huffington Post viewed the documentary, The Dark Side , before it was scheduled to be aired Sunday night. Howard, 36, denied to Al Jazeera that he used the drug. He was alleged to have received performance enhancers from Charlie Sly, a pharmacist who once worked at an antiaging clinic in Indiana.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
50 CHILDREN: THE RESCUE MISSION OF MR. AND MRS. KRAUS. 9 p.m. Monday, HBO. EVERY SO OFTEN, a documentary comes along with a story so good, it's easy to imagine it as a feature film. "50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus," which premieres on HBO on Monday to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day, is one such documentary: It has the characters, the plot points, and most importantly, it has the goose bumps. Which makes it all the more remarkable that the story of Philadelphians Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus, who left their own two children behind to rescue 50 Jewish children from Nazi Europe, wasn't much talked about until recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Abril family hover over their father, who is being kept alive by a respirator. "It's in our hands," says a son, "whether he will live or not. " "It's over, right?" asks another son, his question more of a plea. "It's over, right? There's nothing we can do for him?" "If we remove the respirator, it will seem like we are killing him," anguishes a daughter. "We will be burdened by guilty feelings, that we took him off. " The anguish of the Abril family comes at the beginning of a powerful and timely one-hour documentary airing at 10 tonight on Channel 12. WHOSE Death Is It, Anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - One year ago, after putting in a full day of work at her local department store, Betsy DelValley got home and pulled out her video camera. It was July 24, 2010, the day YouTube launched an experimental project asking users of the social-media site worldwide to submit videos about what transpired in their lives over 24 hours. The best submissions would be culled together for a documentary film. DelValley, then 19, was intrigued by the undertaking. The problem was, nothing all that exciting had transpired on the day she was meant to film.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Staff Writer
On Jan. 25, 1981, days after their long captivity in Iran ended, 52 former hostages and their families watched Super Bowl XV in the Thayer Hotel's wood-paneled Patton Tavern, where American flags were nearly as plentiful as the yellow ribbons at New Orleans' Superdome. If they diverted their eyes from the colorful Eagles-Raiders telecast, these newly minted heroes could look out the tavern's windows and see both the ice-crusted Hudson River and the U.S. Military Academy, whose castle-like structures were citadels of a freedom they had been denied for 444 days.
SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
RORY KARPF didn't have any trouble coming up with the title for the ESPN "30 for 30" documentary he directed that airs on Selection Sunday at 9 p.m. "I Hate Christian Laettner" is the title of a film about the former Duke player who despite hitting "the shot" went on to become villified by people he never met. "They wanted to do this one on Christian," said Karpf, who has also done the "Book of Manning" and "Snoop & Son, A Dad's Dream" for...
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
BACK IN THE DAY, when major league baseball resembled a half-vast plantation and teams owned players forever and a day, the Cardinals traded centerfielder Curt Flood to the Phillies. It was October 1969 and Flood got the news from the publicity guy, so far down the chain of command he rattled when he walked. Flood said, hell no, he won't go. What he actually said was, "In the history of man, there's no other profession except slavery where one man is tied to one owner for the rest of his life.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Temple University players LaMont Ferrell and Darrin Pearsall just wanted their former basketball coach to say yes . . . to a documentary . . . about his life . . . for television. But the coach in question was John Chaney. The answer - not surprising - was a repeated and defiant "No!" So Ferrell and Pearsall, once high school basketball stars and rivals, staged an intervention. They gathered 10 of Chaney's former players to convince the 82-year-old Hall of Fame coach that not only was his life worth the effort, but, more important, the filmmakers wouldn't get on his nerves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nineteenth-century Philadelphia is often characterized as a center of abolitionist thought and a haven for Southern slaves seeking freedom. But that is a simplification, as we learn from the latest installment of Philadelphia: The Great Experiment , an ongoing half-hour documentary series produced by Philadelphia entrepreneur Sam Katz's History Making Productions. It will air at 7:30 p.m. Thursday on 6ABC. Titled "Disorder: 1820-1854," the sixth installment of the 13-part series explores the racist sentiment widespread among working-class whites who felt displaced by the city's growing number of free blacks.
NEWS
January 20, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Staff Writer
On Jan. 25, 1981, days after their long captivity in Iran ended, 52 former hostages and their families watched Super Bowl XV in the Thayer Hotel's wood-paneled Patton Tavern, where American flags were nearly as plentiful as the yellow ribbons at New Orleans' Superdome. If they diverted their eyes from the colorful Eagles-Raiders telecast, these newly minted heroes could look out the tavern's windows and see both the ice-crusted Hudson River and the U.S. Military Academy, whose castle-like structures were citadels of a freedom they had been denied for 444 days.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was excited when I heard one of the writers of The Office had created a workplace sitcom set at a Walmart-ian bargain basement box store. It's a tantalizing idea with plenty of room for goofy fun and social satire alike. I should have known better. NBC's America Ferrera vehicle, Superstore , premiering at 8 p.m. Monday, is an unimaginative, run-of-the-mill network affair full of stock characters, flat dialogue, and too many poop references. It's one of two new and very different shows next week.
SPORTS
December 28, 2015 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
According to the Huffington Post, an investigative documentary by Al Jazeera alleges that Phillies first baseman Ryan Howard and other prominent professional athletes received human growth hormones from a Texas-based pharmacist. The Huffington Post viewed the documentary, The Dark Side , before it was scheduled to be aired Sunday night. Howard, 36, denied to Al Jazeera that he used the drug. He was alleged to have received performance enhancers from Charlie Sly, a pharmacist who once worked at an antiaging clinic in Indiana.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Katz is turning his lens away from Philadelphia's history to Pennsylvania's present. The three-time mayoral candidate announced Thursday that his next documentary will focus on the saga of embattled Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane. Katz, who is seeking funding for the project, plans to call it The Kane Mutiny . Unlike his previous regionally focused documentaries with his History Making Productions - such as Philadelphia: The Great Experiment - Katz sees The Kane Mutiny as a story with national appeal because of its uniqueness, and because Kane is "such an unusual character.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
'As you could guess," says film director Sean Evans, "Roger is not afraid to speak his mind. " That unbridled spirit is Roger Waters, cofounder and former front man of Pink Floyd, and, now, codirector with Evans of a documentary on the progressive British band's celebrated theatrical work, The Wall. The film was released this week on BluRay/DVD. Waters was in his 30s when he conceived the rock opera, about the psychotic decay of a fictional rock artist named Pink, drawn in part from Water's own inner turmoil.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SERVING UP BANANAS laced with marijuana to rhesus monkeys on an island in the Caribbean - all in a day's work for Jon Greene. Well, not exactly, but Jon was the cameraman recording the effect of this unusual repast on the unsuspecting primates as part of a study. Jon, who spent most of his life behind a camera, mostly with Philadelphia's Channel 10, had been hired for this project by a researcher from the Dorothea Dix psychiatric hospital in Raleigh, N.C. It involved lugging heavy cameras onto the island off Puerto Rico, tramping through the jungle, dodging an irate ape that threatened to attack, and setting up the cameras to record the pot-eating monkeys' reactions compared with a control group that got a regular monkey diet.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
HERE ARE five buzzed-about movies that do not (yet) have theatrical distribution, so you can see them locally on the big screen only at the Film Festival. * THE HIGH SUN. The recipient of the Un Certain Regard Jury Prize at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival took home the honor for its complex look at the fallout from ethnic wars in the former Yugoslavia, between 1991 to 2011. The story is told from the standpoint of six people and three love stories. In the process, Croatian director Dalibor Matanic manages to convey what was once possible, what was lost and the unhealed scars that remain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To say that Malala Yousafzai appears wise beyond her years is an understatement of epic scale. The heroine of Davis Guggenheim's rightly deferential documentary, He Named Me Malala , is the youngest person to be accorded the Nobel Peace Prize. She was 17 when she was presented the laureate last year, and she had been nominated for the same honor the previous year. (The news of that first nomination, and the Yousafzai family's response to it, is captured in a telling, sitting-around-the-house moment in Guggenheim's film.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN THE documentary "Peace Officer," we see police storming a home where the surprised resident wields a golf club, moments before he's shot and killed. The officer who fired said he thought the man might have been holding a sword. The incident, like others that are typical of police work, exists on a deadly knife edge of uncertainty, where tragic events are bound to occur, as civilians understand. With that in mind, many Americans have traditionally granted police significant leeway doing their jobs, especially those of us raised on "Blue Knight" images of veteran officers dispensing justice with Solomon-like wisdom and skill.
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