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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
A startling and experimental documentary on the order of The Thin Blue Line, James Benning's Used Innocence enjoys its local premiere tonight at Doylestown's James-Lorah House Auditorium. Not even the convicted murderer can solve this murder mystery. Tonight, 7:30, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. CLOSELY WATCHED FILMS James-Lorah House Auditorium, Main & Broad Sts, Doylestown. Phone: 345-5663 or 297-8517. Tonight 7:30: Used Innocence, James Benning's structuralist documentary, in which the filmmaker becomes personally involved with the film's subject, a convicted murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW YORK had Max's Kansas City and CBGB's. Los Angeles boasted the Roxy. Liverpool, England, had its Cavern Club. Here in Philadelphia, the pre-eminent rock 'n' roll club for many moons was J.C. Dobbs, a long chute of a room and hangout on the "hippest street in town," a/k/a lower South Street. Hot and happening from 1975 to 1996, Dobbs was the place where local heroes such as Wilmington's George Thorogood and Robert Hazard were discovered, where bands like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Oasis, Green Day and Rage Against the Machine kick-started a buzz, and solo talents like Sarah McLachlan and Beck first faced and conquered a Philly contingent.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
50 CHILDREN: THE RESCUE MISSION OF MR. AND MRS. KRAUS. 9 p.m. Monday, HBO. EVERY SO OFTEN, a documentary comes along with a story so good, it's easy to imagine it as a feature film. "50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus," which premieres on HBO on Monday to mark Holocaust Remembrance Day, is one such documentary: It has the characters, the plot points, and most importantly, it has the goose bumps. Which makes it all the more remarkable that the story of Philadelphians Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus, who left their own two children behind to rescue 50 Jewish children from Nazi Europe, wasn't much talked about until recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1996 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Members of the Abril family hover over their father, who is being kept alive by a respirator. "It's in our hands," says a son, "whether he will live or not. " "It's over, right?" asks another son, his question more of a plea. "It's over, right? There's nothing we can do for him?" "If we remove the respirator, it will seem like we are killing him," anguishes a daughter. "We will be burdened by guilty feelings, that we took him off. " The anguish of the Abril family comes at the beginning of a powerful and timely one-hour documentary airing at 10 tonight on Channel 12. WHOSE Death Is It, Anyway?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - One year ago, after putting in a full day of work at her local department store, Betsy DelValley got home and pulled out her video camera. It was July 24, 2010, the day YouTube launched an experimental project asking users of the social-media site worldwide to submit videos about what transpired in their lives over 24 hours. The best submissions would be culled together for a documentary film. DelValley, then 19, was intrigued by the undertaking. The problem was, nothing all that exciting had transpired on the day she was meant to film.
NEWS
February 11, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Temple University players LaMont Ferrell and Darrin Pearsall just wanted their former basketball coach to say yes . . . to a documentary . . . about his life . . . for television. But the coach in question was John Chaney. The answer - not surprising - was a repeated and defiant "No!" So Ferrell and Pearsall, once high school basketball stars and rivals, staged an intervention. They gathered 10 of Chaney's former players to convince the 82-year-old Hall of Fame coach that not only was his life worth the effort, but, more important, the filmmakers wouldn't get on his nerves.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
WHILE Melissa Fitzgerald was in northern Uganda filming her documentary "Staging Hope," a teenager came up to her and asked for one thing: "Don't let us die in these camps," the youth said. "Don't forget about us. " His appeal is repeated several times throughout "Staging Hope. " Through the documentary, Fitzgerald - who grew up in Chestnut Hill and graduated from Springside School and the University of Pennsylvania - hopes to inform the U.S. about the plight of northern Uganda and keep the conversation about humanitarian efforts alive.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IT'S NOT FUNNY and it won't amuse you. There's no clowning around in ESPN's latest Emmy-winning "30 for 30" documentary. The series, in its fifth season, kicks off with "Playing for the Mob," which chronicles the point-shaving scandal Boston College's men's basketball team was involved in during the 1978-79 season. Fans of the film "Goodfellas" will be familiar with some of those involved as Jimmy "The Gent" Burke and Henry Hill were among the mob associates who convinced four BC players to help fix games.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2011 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Morgan Spurlock may be a supersized presence in the world of documentary, but he sounds like a guy who's ready to leave the genre behind. Certainly he doesn't want to do it forever. "I hope not," he said. "There are actually a couple of narrative films that I'm attached to right now. One is with Leonardo DiCaprio's company. It's kind of an Erin Brockovich-ish type movie. " Spurlock is promoting "POM Wonderful Presents the Greatest Movie Ever Sold," his documentary about product placement in Hollywood movies and new trends in advertising.
SPORTS
July 12, 2011
BACK IN THE DAY, when major league baseball resembled a half-vast plantation and teams owned players forever and a day, the Cardinals traded centerfielder Curt Flood to the Phillies. It was October 1969 and Flood got the news from the publicity guy, so far down the chain of command he rattled when he walked. Flood said, hell no, he won't go. What he actually said was, "In the history of man, there's no other profession except slavery where one man is tied to one owner for the rest of his life.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
MUHAMMAD ALI has a big heart, a kind heart, a generous heart. Loves kids, especially his own, which number seven or nine, or more, depending on who is doing the counting. Heavyweight champion in a brutal sport, loves his kids, nice story line, but you can't stretch that into a 2-hour documentary, no matter how many cute-as-a-cupcake phone conversations you include. They try in "I Am Ali," which opens in theaters today. It is no more a complete and honest depiction of Ali than any of the books, magazine articles, films and documentaries that preceded it. Maybe next year.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IT'S NOT FUNNY and it won't amuse you. There's no clowning around in ESPN's latest Emmy-winning "30 for 30" documentary. The series, in its fifth season, kicks off with "Playing for the Mob," which chronicles the point-shaving scandal Boston College's men's basketball team was involved in during the 1978-79 season. Fans of the film "Goodfellas" will be familiar with some of those involved as Jimmy "The Gent" Burke and Henry Hill were among the mob associates who convinced four BC players to help fix games.
NEWS
September 25, 2014
A story Monday on a new Philadelphia documentary by Sam Katz wrongly gave the name of Cardinal Dennis Dougherty, archbishop of Philadelphia from 1918 to 1951.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
DEAR STUPID, young, just-being-yourselves pop stars, Here's a tip. We know it's impossible for you to control your coolness, outrageousness and sex drive, but everything in the world is not a prop in your stage show. TMZ.com reports that Miley Cyrus , the type of concert star who might perform in Iraq and wonder what the fuss was when she twerked with a guy in a black ski mask, could go to jail for getting her prosthetic behind spanked on stage . . . with a Mexican flag.
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
CREATIVE spirits often teeter on the brink between genius and madness. So we witness again in "Finding Fela," Alex Gibney's engaging documentary dig into the life and times of Nigerian superstar Fela Anikulapo Kuti - not only the guiding light of Afro-beat music but also one of the most outspoken and controversial figures in modern African history. Using music as his pulpit to condemn (often comically) the corruption and repressiveness of Nigeria's military rulers, Fela regularly put career and even his life on the line - reasons that the artist-activist is often mentioned (and idolized)
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"FED UP" argues that sugar is the new tobacco, and cites hard evidence to back its claim, but evidence takes you only so far where food is concerned. We're a people who'd rather die eating Pop Tarts than live eating broccoli. Thus far, even feeble attempts to limit our increasingly toxic load of sugar and corn syrup (nearly 20 times what it was a century ago) have met with angry denunciations of an encroaching "nanny state. " In this view, our appetite is a Cliven Bundy steer that must be free to graze the open range of Oreos and Bugles and Krimpets without government intervention - separation of Church's and state.
NEWS
May 3, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten Villanova University students, their bags packed with cameras and video equipment, traveled across the world to a village in rural India last fall. They spent two weeks meeting the people of Prashanthagiri and following program managers for Profugo, an Ardmore-based nonprofit that works to support residents in the village. The result: A documentary film called Before We Sleep. "It's based on a small community in India, and we're shedding light on the social injustices of poverty, alcoholism, abuse, traditional gender roles there," said Danielle Cordisco, a senior at Villanova and a student in the social justice documentary class.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like most Americans born since the video revolution, Sasha Joseph Neulinger's childhood was lived on camera. But unlike other families, the home movies his parents took at their Rosemont home showed a family in crisis. A family beset by secrets. At age 7, Neulinger told his parents (Henry Nevison and Jacqui Neulinger) that for the previous four years he had been sexually abused by his paternal uncles Howard and Lawrence Nevison and Lawrence's son, Stewart - the same men captured on video so warmly embracing Neulinger's parents, sharing jokes at birthday parties, or passing the salt across the dinner table.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Ben Kalina had to get through. Two weeks after Hurricane Sandy destroyed large swaths of the Jersey Shore on Oct. 29, 2012, the Philadelphia filmmaker was in his car, trying to talk his way past emergency roadblocks on Long Beach Island. He needed to shoot the aftermath. Officials finally were allowing residents back in - but to assess damage, collect belongings, and get out again. It took three attempts before Kalina and his cameraman made it in and started capturing the devastation in Holgate, on the barrier island's southern, and hardest-hit, end. "That was one of my prouder moments in filmmaking," Kalina says with a smile.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the fourth year in a row, a Cherry Hill girl is a winner in C-Span's national StudentCam competition. Madeline Bowne, a sophomore at Cherry Hill High School East, will be awarded $1,500 for her second-prize documentary, "Driving Under the Influence (of Cell Phones)," about cellphone use while driving. Bowne's piece will be shown on C-Span on April 14 at 6:50 a.m. and throughout the day. Bowne, the daughter of teachers, has become a regular in the highly competitive contest. As a seventh grader, she took a third prize.
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