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NEWS
February 15, 2016
It is the real-life portrait of a North Philadelphia family filmed over nearly a decade. The small, everyday moments - and the stakes and drama attached to them. A father working a job delivering circulars in the North Philly dawn. Or being hassled by police outside his home. A conversation between a mother and daughter, as she braids her child's hair. A daughter pressing for a later curfew. It's a family shown in all its complexity and beauty and playfulness - and it's a look into the crushing realities that threaten each of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - The anti-bullying film "Bully," the climate-change study "Chasing Ice" and the AIDS chronicle "How to Survive a Plague" are among 15 features on the short list for the Academy Award for best documentary. Other contenders announced Monday are the Ethel Kennedy documentary "Ethel," the health care exploration "The Waiting Room" and the music portrait "Searching for Sugar Man," tracing the fate of acclaimed but obscure 1970s singer-songwriter Rodriguez. Members of the academy's documentary branch will narrow the list to five nominees.
NEWS
September 25, 2014
A story Monday on a new Philadelphia documentary by Sam Katz wrongly gave the name of Cardinal Dennis Dougherty, archbishop of Philadelphia from 1918 to 1951.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010
9:30 tonight CHANNEL 12 Here's a documentary about the 2009 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition: 29 pianists compete.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
Alma, a jonquil-thin blonde with a passing resemblance to Taylor Swift, is 15 and sprouting in the Norwegian town of Skoddeheimen, where there's one bus stop and many, many sheep. She lives with her single mother in a state of chronic frustration, sexual and social. Awash in hormones, Alma has two outlets: sexual fantasy and pleasuring herself. Turn Me On, Dammit!, the disarming and droll first feature from documentary filmmaker Jannicke Systad Jacobsen, is that rare thing, a movie that says shame on sexual shame and double shame on the double standard.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
Mike deGruy, 60, an award-winning cinematographer who spent three decades making documentary films about the ocean, was killed in a helicopter crash in eastern Australia. His employer, National Geographic, said Sunday that Mr. deGruy and Australian television writer-producer Andrew Wight died Saturday. Mr. DeGruy won multiple Emmy and British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards for cinematography. An accomplished diver and submersible pilot, the Santa Barbara, Calif., resident was the director of undersea photography for James Cameron's 2005 documentary Last Mysteries of the Titanic . Mr. DeGruy spent much of his early film career traveling the world, shooting for clients including the BBC, PBS and National Geographic, his website says.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone with a Twitter feed will be aware of Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief , even if not by name. For some time, promoted tweets have filled feeds in an attempt to discredit individuals who appear in Going Clear , the documentary that debuts at 8 p.m. Sunday on HBO. The tweets don't mention Alex Gibney's documentary by name, but these paid-for missives accuse ex-Scientologists of being liars, seemingly without context....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011
IT WOULD HAVE been very awkward if Sara Martin and Edward McNelis had broken up between submitting footage for Kevin Macdonald's documentary "Life in a Day" and its release today. Amid the other moments meant to capture the average person's life on July 24, 2010, is Martin and McNelis celebrating their first anniversary as a couple. McNelis, a Bensalem-native and Penn student, heard about Macdonald's project through ads on YouTube and Google. He hounded Martin to participate. Martin demurred at first.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Richard Leacock, 89, a documentary filmmaker and pioneer of the unobtrusive camera technique cinema verite who followed John F. Kennedy on his presidential campaign and was seen by some as the grandfather of reality television, died Wednesday in Paris. His technical acumen supplied the likes of Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut with the tools of their trade. His insightful direction laid the groundwork for generations of filmmakers seeking to use their cameras to capture real life as it happened, colleagues said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Let's raise a toast to Ken Burns, and not just any old swill. How about a sidecar? Or an aviation? Or a clover club? Or any of dozens of elegant cocktails that were popular and widely consumed in the 1920s, when alcohol was illegal in the United States and the country, nevertheless, became the biggest importer of cocktail shakers in the world. Burns and his collaborator, Lynn Novick, have held the reins taut and produced a rarity for them - a historical documentary that sticks to the point and runs at a reasonable length.
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