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NEWS
February 6, 2012
Mike deGruy, 60, an award-winning cinematographer who spent three decades making documentary films about the ocean, was killed in a helicopter crash in eastern Australia. His employer, National Geographic, said Sunday that Mr. deGruy and Australian television writer-producer Andrew Wight died Saturday. Mr. DeGruy won multiple Emmy and British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards for cinematography. An accomplished diver and submersible pilot, the Santa Barbara, Calif., resident was the director of undersea photography for James Cameron's 2005 documentary Last Mysteries of the Titanic . Mr. DeGruy spent much of his early film career traveling the world, shooting for clients including the BBC, PBS and National Geographic, his website says.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
HALL OF FAME linebacker Lawrence Taylor hasn't played since 1993. But he's still going after quarterbacks. Taylor is the subject of a Showtime documentary titled "LT: The Life & Times," which premiered Friday. In the film, former QB Boomer Esiason was critical of Taylor, saying the 10-time Pro Bowler, who spent his entire 13-year career with the Giants, was given preferential treatment by the team and then-coach Bill Parcells. It's nothing Esiason hasn't said before, but LT took exception to Boomer being included in the documentary.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
Richard Leacock, 89, a documentary filmmaker and pioneer of the unobtrusive camera technique cinema verite who followed John F. Kennedy on his presidential campaign and was seen by some as the grandfather of reality television, died Wednesday in Paris. His technical acumen supplied the likes of Jean-Luc Godard and Francois Truffaut with the tools of their trade. His insightful direction laid the groundwork for generations of filmmakers seeking to use their cameras to capture real life as it happened, colleagues said.
NEWS
July 21, 2013 | By Curtis Skinner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sandy Selfridge was one in a thousand. In April 2009, she was diagnosed with scleroderma, a rare autoimmune disease involving the skin. By September, at age 58, she was gone. Her death led Christy McCaffrey, her daughter, to produce a documentary about the disease. The 45-minute film, Project Scleroderma: Beneath the Surface, which took two years and $40,000 to make, is narrated by comedian Bob Saget, who lost his sister to the disease. It's slated for a Thursday premiere at the Ritz East Theatre, 125 S. Second St., at 8 p.m. "At first, it was difficult for me to be sharing something that is obviously so personal," said McCaffrey of Havertown, a hairstylist who partnered with Bill Connell and J.C. Costa of New Pace Productions in Ardmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | BY SOFIYA BALLIN, Daily News Staff Writer ballins@phillynews.com, 215-854-5902
"THE TRIPTYCH" is the title of a new documentary co-directed by Barron Claiborne and Terence Nance , and produced by AfroPunk Pictures. The documentary explores the behind-the-canvas lives of three artists who run in the same circle but whose very different lives contribute to their work. The project came together when Nance, who was profiling unknown artists, teamed up with Claiborne, a self-taught photographer who was working on a similar project on better-known artists, including himself.
NEWS
August 9, 2012
Robert Hughes, 74, the eloquent, combative art critic and historian who lived with operatic flair and wrote with a sense of authority that owed more to Zola or Ruskin than to his own century, died Monday at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx. He died after a long illness, said his wife, Doris Downes. With a Hemingwayesque build and the distinctively rounded vowels of his native Australia, Mr. Hughes became as familiar a presence on TV as in print, over three decades for Time magazine, where he was chief art critic and often a traditionalist scourge in an era when art movements fractured into unrecognizability.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
End of Watch Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña are best friends and patrol car partners, cruising the mean streets of South Central L.A. in David (Training Day) Ayer's visceral, violent cop thriller. R Looper A slam-bang blast of a time-travel thriller, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis as a guy named Joe - yes, they're the same guy, separated by 30 years in the dystopian future and brought together when Young Joe, a hit man, gets a job to kill Old Joe. Emily Blunt co-stars, as the mother of a kid with weird powers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011
OPENING LAST night and continuing through Tuesday is the fourth annual Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival, sponsored by HBO and Comcast and screening at various locations around the city. The festival comprises 10 features and 18 shorts for all audiences, from romantic comedy to documentary. Today's Asian American filmmakers target broader audiences by exploring more universal themes while retaining an Asian American flavor in their work. "Enforcing the Silence," for example, explores themes of discrimination as it focuses on the unsolved murder of San Francisco Vietnamese activist Lam Duong in July 1981 by anticommunist extremists.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
Bert Schneider, 78, a producer of Easy Rider and other films that helped define the social unrest of the late 1960s and early '70s, died Monday in Los Angeles. Mr. Schneider was a major behind-the-scenes force in the movement to make Hollywood more responsive to a youthful audience. Hearts and Minds (1974), which he produced with Peter Davis, was a documentary that focused on opposition to the Vietnam War. It won the Academy Award as best documentary in 1975.
NEWS
February 22, 2013
By Steve Hallock This year's menu of Oscar-nominated short documentaries offers not only compelling viewing but also hope for those who despair over the decline of a robust, independent press that serves as investigative watchdog over government, business, and society. Not only are some newspapers going out of business, but those remaining - other than a few major city dailies - are eliminating investigative reporting teams and closing foreign and national bureaus. Broadcast television, meanwhile, long ago saw its special reports and foreign bureaus wither as the networks and the cable brethren exponentially increased sports and entertainment fare.
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