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Dodgeball

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does dodgeball have that other dubious games such as whiffleball, shuffleboard and badminton don't? Its own movie. Admittedly, Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story isn't much of a movie. Then again, dodgeball isn't much of a sport. This lumbering comedy revolves around a genial guy (Vince Vaughn, trying to channel Bill Murray's loosey-goosey performance in Stripes) who finds that his gym is about to be consumed by a cruel and rapacious competitor. Pete hopes to save his business (the appropriately named Average Joe's)
NEWS
April 24, 2001
For the second time in three years, the budget for the Cherry Hill School District teeters on the brink of not passing, this time by a margin of eight votes out of more than 6,000 cast, pending a potential recount. I'm sure pundits will attribute the margin to protest votes against any number of sacred cows, including taxes that are too high, dissatisfaction with the lottery to attend Rosa International Middle School, and open elementary enrollment. Take your pick. What gets lost in the noise is the fundamental fact that many parents in Cherry Hill do not vote, failing to prevent program cuts that, if their kids are affected, they are so quick to protest.
NEWS
May 2, 2001
Struggling to deal with arrest As the mother of a former student of John Danze, the teacher accused of terrorizing his own school by calling in bomb threats, I feel compelled to respond to the April 17 letter, "Don't demonize teacher. " First, I sincerely believe the writer would be hard-pressed to find someone who would deny that Danze was an excellent teacher. He came into our lives like a breath of fresh air and quickly made a name for himself. He was creative, energetic and fun. Within weeks, he earned the respect of his colleagues, the admiration of the parents, and the love of his students.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Amy Rossano had never heard of the game GaGa before this summer. Now the mother of two spends most weekends watching her sons play - or even jumping in the pit herself. "It's so much fun and it's great exercise," said Rossano, mom of Harrison, 9, and Nolan, 7. "We practically live here. " "Here" is South Jersey GaGa in Cherry Hill, touted as New Jersey's first indoor GaGa facility. Co-owners Don Melnick and Steve Baselice started the business this summer and now have almost every weekend through May booked with birthday parties.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamil Miller's mother won't be there to see him when the aspiring cardiologist graduates from Camden's Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School second in his class on Wednesday. Instead, Miller will mail a DVD of the ceremony to the Edna Mahan Correctional Facility in Clinton, N.J. That's where his mother is serving a seven-year sentence for robbery. His father won't be present, either. He died in a car crash when Miller was 5. But Kevin Ruiz, his best friend since fourth grade, will be there, graduating with him. Ruiz, who says he intends to become mayor of Camden and has had more than his share of hard times, will listen with pride as Miller - "my boy" - gives his graduation address.
NEWS
December 7, 2000
Look out. Political correctness may be coming to a physical education class near you. In Cecil County, Md., school officials are debating whether to ban games such as dodgeball that involve "human targets. " Meanwhile, the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, made up of 20,000 fitness professionals, advises elementary school gym teachers to avoid activities that have winners and losers or that compare the performances of individual children or teams. On the association's list of "psychologically and/or physically unsafe" activities in are dodgeball, Red Rover and relay races.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Khashema, 8, and her brother, Khalif, 6, both aspire to be professional basketball players. Khashema would like to attend a basketball camp someday. Khalif is positive he'll grow really tall soon. "My feet are so big already," he says, "I'll have an edge. " These siblings have a close bond, and have abuse and neglect in their background. Therapy is helping them deal with the issues of their past. Their foster mother says Khalif is quiet, sweet-natured, and often a comedian; Khashema is outgoing and wants to belong.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The sticky comic premise to "The Ex" is built around a wildly escalating romantic rivalry between two men, one of whom is in a wheelchair. Zach Braff stars as Tom, a guy who abandons his career as a New York chef and retreats to the hometown of his wife (Amanda Peet) in Ohio, where he takes a job with an advertising agency managed by her father (Charles Grodin). It's a wacky firm owned by a New Age-y guru (Donal Logue) who encourages workers to toss around an imaginary idea ball and issue apologies on Post-it notes in lieu of uttering them aloud.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2004 | Reviews by Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson, unless noted
ANCHORMAN. Blissfully ignorant '70s chauvinist and news reader (Will Ferrell) flips out when he shares the set with a female (Christina Applegate). Often funny, but complete anarchy, and a movie in the loosest sense. (PG-13) B- BEFORE SUNSET. Quirky sequel to indie fave "Before Sunrise" reuniting young lovers (Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy) nine years later. A novelty pic, but well-done. (R) B A CINDERELLA STORY. The classic fairy tale has lost its magic to limp slapstick and uneven acting.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
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NEWS
May 3, 2013 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MY FRIEND Sammye has never claimed to be a domestic goddess. "The only reason I have a kitchen is it came with the house," she'll proclaim in her distinctive Mississippi twang. And she's not alone. There are plenty of Americans who say that they don't or can't cook - about 28 percent, or almost a third, according to a survey conducted by Impulse Research on behalf of Bosch home appliances. To someone like myself, who loves everything about the cooking process, how these folks manage to feed themselves is a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Amy Rossano had never heard of the game GaGa before this summer. Now the mother of two spends most weekends watching her sons play - or even jumping in the pit herself. "It's so much fun and it's great exercise," said Rossano, mom of Harrison, 9, and Nolan, 7. "We practically live here. " "Here" is South Jersey GaGa in Cherry Hill, touted as New Jersey's first indoor GaGa facility. Co-owners Don Melnick and Steve Baselice started the business this summer and now have almost every weekend through May booked with birthday parties.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamil Miller's mother won't be there to see him when the aspiring cardiologist graduates from Camden's Dr. Charles E. Brimm Medical Arts High School second in his class on Wednesday. Instead, Miller will mail a DVD of the ceremony to the Edna Mahan Correctional Facility in Clinton, N.J. That's where his mother is serving a seven-year sentence for robbery. His father won't be present, either. He died in a car crash when Miller was 5. But Kevin Ruiz, his best friend since fourth grade, will be there, graduating with him. Ruiz, who says he intends to become mayor of Camden and has had more than his share of hard times, will listen with pride as Miller - "my boy" - gives his graduation address.
LIVING
April 21, 2010 | By Lindsay J. Warner FOR THE INQUIRER
The list of names posted on the wall at the Skate Zone was Jean Shea's first indication that her dodgeball team was not like the others. One by one, she read the other teams' attempts at anatomical-parts puns (think anything involving the word balls). A peek into the gym confirmed it: Her team, the G-rated "Ball Dawgs," was poised to be annihilated - by a bunch of teenagers. Of the 24 teams that signed up for the spring competitive dodgeball session in Voorhees, only Shea's group - now affectionately dubbed by others in the Glory Days Sports league as "Team AARP" - has players older than 40. As expected, the Ball Dawgs were pummeled that first day. But three months into the season, the team of Haddonfield husbands and wives - the oldest player is 55 - has stuck with it, earning some grudging admiration from their younger opponents as well as a respectable eighth-place standing in the weekly league.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The sticky comic premise to "The Ex" is built around a wildly escalating romantic rivalry between two men, one of whom is in a wheelchair. Zach Braff stars as Tom, a guy who abandons his career as a New York chef and retreats to the hometown of his wife (Amanda Peet) in Ohio, where he takes a job with an advertising agency managed by her father (Charles Grodin). It's a wacky firm owned by a New Age-y guru (Donal Logue) who encourages workers to toss around an imaginary idea ball and issue apologies on Post-it notes in lieu of uttering them aloud.
NEWS
March 2, 2006 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Quakertown, physical education class is lifting weights and bending bodies over exercise balls. In Cherry Hill, it's aerobics, Pilates and yoga. In Philadelphia, it's roller-blading and a video game-like activity that has students running and jumping at a frenetic pace in front of a TV screen. Wellness, not dodgeball, is stressed in this new kind of gym class. Grades are about heart rates and aerobic activity, not climbing ropes. Fitness for life is what it's all about.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | BY TANYA BARRIENTOS INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On television they are the undisputed queens of the household, swapping families in one show and living desperate lives on another. In the movies, they might come in the Stepford variety. Wives. Throughout history, "The Mrs. " has worn many hats - from husband's chattel to modern independent spouse. Gone are the days when brides automatically adopted their husbands' names. Erased are the marriage vows that required a woman to "obey. " Forgotten is the archaic man-and-his-castle mentality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2004 | Reviews by Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson, unless noted
ANCHORMAN. Blissfully ignorant '70s chauvinist and news reader (Will Ferrell) flips out when he shares the set with a female (Christina Applegate). Often funny, but complete anarchy, and a movie in the loosest sense. (PG-13) B- BEFORE SUNSET. Quirky sequel to indie fave "Before Sunrise" reuniting young lovers (Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy) nine years later. A novelty pic, but well-done. (R) B A CINDERELLA STORY. The classic fairy tale has lost its magic to limp slapstick and uneven acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The origins of dodgeball are unknown. It is believed to have been invented by a sadistic gym teacher (or is that redundant?) from Wilkes-Barre. Less a game than a reign of terror foisted on adolescents, dodgeball encouraged a handful of alpha-bullies to strut around the gym like so many wanton Zeuses, hurling thunderbolts at their cowering, quivering prey. This cruel sport introduced generations of schoolchildren to the meaning of wet-your-pants humiliation. Well, dodgeball is back.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What does dodgeball have that other dubious games such as whiffleball, shuffleboard and badminton don't? Its own movie. Admittedly, Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story isn't much of a movie. Then again, dodgeball isn't much of a sport. This lumbering comedy revolves around a genial guy (Vince Vaughn, trying to channel Bill Murray's loosey-goosey performance in Stripes) who finds that his gym is about to be consumed by a cruel and rapacious competitor. Pete hopes to save his business (the appropriately named Average Joe's)
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