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Dog Tags

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NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Mari Schaefer
Delaware County dog owners looking to purchase the yearly state dog tag can now do so online, the county announced. Pennsylvania law mandates that all dogs older than three months have a state-issued tag. The regular yearly fee is $6.45 for a dog that has been spayed or neutered. The online service does not apply to lifetime licenses, which start at $31.45 and require a microchip or tattoo and verification from a veterinarian. There is a 5 percent fee to use the online service, to cover shipping and handling of the tag. Fines for an unlicensed dog can be $300, according to the county.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Jaimee Moreton could go back in time, she'd go prepared. She even has the dress. "World War II was such an exciting time in our nation's history, and if I could, I'd be a USO singer entertaining the American troops," said Moreton, a sophomore at Burlington County Special Services School District. Moreton donned a blue satin strapless dress to portray a USO entertainer for the district's Flag Day commemoration of the war. With her was classmate Jennifer Rockhill, dressed in an Army WAC uniform.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If Jaimee Moreton could go back in time, she'd go prepared. She even has the dress. "World War II was such an exciting time in our nation's history, and if I could, I'd be a USO singer entertaining the American troops," said Moreton, a sophomore at Burlington County Special Services School District. Moreton donned a blue satin strapless dress to portray a USO entertainer for the district's Flag Day commemoration of the war. With her was classmate Jennifer Rockhill, dressed in an Army WAC uniform.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By Lea Sitton and David Lieber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article
The stencils of the dog tags are clear enough to read: Lemmons, T.A., USN. Avery, Ronald. The bits of bone are small, no bigger than the distance from a man's knuckle to his fingertip. Tommy Nguyen of Kensington says these things were found by his cousin's friend on a mushroom-hunting trip on the other side of the world, in woods not far from the 17th parallel, the invisible line that once divided North and South Vietnam. Nguyen visited his native Vietnam this year and smuggled the bones out in a cigarette pack.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
AN INGENIOUS PLAN Someday, you may be asked to show some genes for ID. The Defense Department is studying the possibility of using "DNA dog tags" to identify GIs killed in combat or accidents. The metal dog tags U.S. military personnel now wear around their necks often are lost in violent deaths. Under the new system, blood samples would be stored so that GIs could be identified by their DNA. THE OPERATIVE THEORY So far, so good for orthopedic surgeons. Amid the furor over doctors' getting AIDS from patients and vice versa, tests by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control found only two such surgeons infected with the virus - neither one on the job. But, since the tests were voluntary, the CDC warns that the rate might be higher if orthopedic surgeons - considered to be at high risk for HIV transmission because of their intense work with blood, tissue and bone - knew they were infected and chose not to participate.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
The last time Karl Gross counted, there were 65 of them. Little white wooden crosses, draped with dog tags, in the shadow of Hill 327. The guys called it Freedom Hill. The other side of the hill was where Bob Hope would entertain when he visited Da Nang. It was among the crosses, at the bottom of Freedom Hill, that Marine Lance Corporal Gross passed much of his time between 25-day patrols in the jungles of Vietnam. During one of those breaks, Gross aligned the crosses in a staggered formation to resemble those in Arlington National Cemetery.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edwin Pearce knows the pain of captivity, having spent 607 days in Nazi prisons during World War II. That helped him keep faith when his son Jack was shot down over Southeast Asia and listed as missing in action. But nothing prepared him for a battle against his own government over his boy's fate. It started when search-team officials found a tooth at the Laos crash site, identified it as his son's and said that confirmed his death. "The government was going to send that tooth (to me)
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Jerome Dorn, of South Philadelphia, doesn't want to just walk in the Million Man March next Monday. He wants to walk to the historic event in Washington, D.C. Dorn, of Catharine Street near 24th, hopes his six-to-eight-day march will further dramatize Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan's call for atonement and unity within the black community. "I'm not a Muslim," Dorn said. "But I believe it's time that we stood up as black men and come back and take over our destiny and the destiny of our communities.
NEWS
February 10, 2010 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
For the enigmatic, playful, and sometimes downright creepy group the Residents, obscurity isn't a mark of commercial failure so much as the fruit of long-standing dedication. The three people who came on stage at World Cafe Live on Monday evening might have been among those who founded the San Francisco-based experimental conclave more than 40 years ago, or they might have been new recruits, filling prefab identities like an avant-garde version of Beatlemania. They appear on stage in costumes, most famously tuxedos topped with eyeball heads; in this case, the silent musicians wore form-fitting black with sequined waistcoats, goggles, and synthetic dreadlocks.
NEWS
August 8, 1998
"Those first 25 minutes . . . " That's all that has to be said, and people know you're referring to the opening scene in Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan. " For almost a half-hour, you're swept up in the most overwhelming, awe-inspiring, no-holds-barred depiction of war probably ever filmed. A graphic portrayal of the D-Day landing in Normandy, it's nothing like war as you saw it in those old John Wayne and Robert Mitchum movies. It's slaughter, deafening noise, screaming, terror, blood, body parts and total confusion - and those who have experienced combat will tell you it's pretty close to what it's like.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Katie Zezima, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - Carol Wilkins leaned over the side of her father's wheelchair and handed him the small red box, a heart-shaped cutout revealing its contents: a weathered, bent silver dog tag. "Oh, Daddy, look," Wilkins said as her 90-year-old father opened it. "They're back. " Sixty-nine years after losing his dog tag on the battlefields of southern France, Willie Wilkins reclaimed it Wednesday after a trans-Atlantic effort to return it. "I am so happy," Carol Wilkins said.
SPORTS
November 27, 2012
Rory McIlroy made five straight birdies down the stretch to overtake Justin Rose and win the Dubai World Championship on Sunday, ending a year in which the 23-year-old Northern Irishman won the PGA Championship and the European and PGA Tour money titles. The top-ranked McIlroy recovered from early putting woes to finish at 6-under 66 for a total of 23-under 265 at the season-ending tournament. Rose, who was tied for seventh after three rounds, surged into contention after shooting a course-record 62 that included an eagle and eight birdies.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | Mari Schaefer
Delaware County dog owners looking to purchase the yearly state dog tag can now do so online, the county announced. Pennsylvania law mandates that all dogs older than three months have a state-issued tag. The regular yearly fee is $6.45 for a dog that has been spayed or neutered. The online service does not apply to lifetime licenses, which start at $31.45 and require a microchip or tattoo and verification from a veterinarian. There is a 5 percent fee to use the online service, to cover shipping and handling of the tag. Fines for an unlicensed dog can be $300, according to the county.
NEWS
May 29, 2011
Danielle Elizabeth Cameron is a junior majoring in communications and English at the University of Pittsburgh He once stood tall, with deep Italian skin and his head covered in thick, dark brown hair. Now he sits across from me, his small, pale blue eyes hidden behind large-frame glasses. His hands are folded calmly together, fingers interlaced, in his lap. There are strands of gray in his hair, but he is still tan as if he had been out at sea for months, weathered by the swift winds and harsh waters.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most dog owners in Philadelphia - and they are legion - either don't know or don't care that the city requires them to buy a license. Fewer than 5 percent of dog owners get them, according to estimates, adding a paltry $119,000 to the city's coffers. Meanwhile, the city animal shelter - an old warehouse on West Hunting Park Avenue - remains overcrowded and underfunded, accepting far more animals than can be cared for. In recent years, the shelter has been taking in more than 30,000 animals annually and euthanizing between 15,000 and 18,000 of them, according to city officials.
NEWS
February 10, 2010 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
For the enigmatic, playful, and sometimes downright creepy group the Residents, obscurity isn't a mark of commercial failure so much as the fruit of long-standing dedication. The three people who came on stage at World Cafe Live on Monday evening might have been among those who founded the San Francisco-based experimental conclave more than 40 years ago, or they might have been new recruits, filling prefab identities like an avant-garde version of Beatlemania. They appear on stage in costumes, most famously tuxedos topped with eyeball heads; in this case, the silent musicians wore form-fitting black with sequined waistcoats, goggles, and synthetic dreadlocks.
NEWS
June 22, 2009 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In neighborhoods like Strawberry Mansion, where so many young men end up killed or incarcerated, Eric Skelton is an old-head at 43. He messed up but moved on, and he did not abandon the neighborhood. Three years ago, Skelton and a handful of guys he'd known since kindergarten founded Few Good Men - an unfunded, informal coalition determined to repair the streets where they once raised havoc. "I don't want it on my conscience that I destroyed this neighborhood," Skelton says.
NEWS
November 23, 2008 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The visionary moment that helped inspire a community-square project came after death in Iraq touched Doylestown. A routine morning jog capped by the sight of a flying bald eagle led a local businesswoman to think of a patriotic pin worn by one grieving mother and the dog tags around the neck of another. That moment last spring helped bring the jogger together with a mosaic artist and the mothers of two 26-year-old Doylestown Township servicemen who died within a week of each other.
NEWS
October 3, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Every October for the last four years, the Sunnybrook Ballroom in Pottstown has taken a trip back in time to the era of big bands, khaki uniforms and USO canteens. Hundreds of men and women have crowded onto the big wooden dance floor to jitterbug, bellied up to the bar at the officers club, and collected their ration coupons for snacks and sodas. The nostalgia, of course, has been plentiful and free. "The people really get into it," said Bill Krause, cochairman of the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2003 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The whole package was promising: Thursday night with the first lady of the Ruff Ryders (Philly's Eve) and the main man of Murder Inc. (Ja Rule) in a clubby environment (Electric Factory) with an all-age crowd. Why it was far from sold out is anybody's guess. But if you weren't among the parka-wearing rainbow coalition of youths at the intimate show (both were backed only by a DJ and dancers, old-school style), consider yourself unlucky. Prowling like the panther whose paw-prints famously adorn her tattooed chest, Eve showed she's both the haute couture hottie hyped throughout fashion media and the hip-hop gangsta moll that was her original persona.
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