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Dogfish Head

ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2011
Here are area finalists for 2011 James Beard Foundation Awards, which will be announced Monday: OUTSTANDING RESTAURANT: Vetri. Marc Vetri and Jeff Benjamin, chefs/owners. OUTSTANDING WINE AND SPIRITS PROFESSIONAL: Sam Calagione, Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Milton, Del. BEST CHEFS IN AMERICA: Michael Solomonov, Zahav. Also, Chef Vola’s, 111 S. Albion Place, Atlantic City, has won the American Classics award. The restaurant is owned by Louise Esposito, Michael Esposito, Michael Esposito Jr. and Louis Esposito.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
BEER ENTHUSIASTS are so easy to buy gifts for. As long as it comes in a sixpack, we're happy with whatever you give us. And we're even happier with a little more imagination on your part. Look no further than Joe Sixpack's Annual Ultimate Gift Guide. For the DIYer Local home-brew shops offer all-in-one starter kits for kitchen brewmasters. Or head to Northern Brewer, an online home-brew supplier, for one of its holiday-inspired kits, including Festivus Miracle Holiday Ale ($49.99)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2010
REGIONAL DISTILLERIES They aren't brewing moonshine, but professional distillers in and around Philadelphia are crafting a variety of products. Here's a sampling. Dogfish Head Brewing & Eats 320 Rehoboth Ave. Rehoboth Beach, Del. 302-226-5771 Products: Restaurant and distillery making Jin gin, Blue Hen Vodka (plus a variety of flavored vodkas) and Brown Honey Rum, Wit Spiced Rhum and White Light Rum. Philadelphia Distilling 12285 McNulty Road, No. 105 215-671-0346 Products: Bluecoat American Dry Gin, Vieux Carre Absinthe Supérieure and Penn 1681 Rye Vodka.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Only six more drinking days until Christmas. That means you'll have to double up on Joe Sixpack's annual 12 Beers of Christmas. Cooked up by happy brewers as a gift to beer fans, these holiday beers typically contain added malt and spices like nutmeg and cinnamon. Each is a satisfying alternative to eggnog and hot toddies, perfect for a cozy evening in front of the fireplace or 'neath the mistletoe. Hurry to your local specialty beer store or tavern, because most will be gone by next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009
WHAT'S OLD is brew again. From heather to pomegranate, unusual ingredients that were common in beer 1,000 years ago are making their way back into the modern brew kettle, thanks to a quirky new wave of experimentation by small brewers. Through academic research and consultation of dusty texts, these brewers are producing a stunning variety of unusually flavored ales that were - until recently - virtually extinct. The oddest, undoubtedly, is Dogfish Head Chicha , brewed this summer with purple maize that founder Sam Calagione and his staff chewed into mush, spit out and dried.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
Quenching Brooklyn spirits Between its obsession for local, artisanal products and the borough's unquenchable thirst, it's no surprise Brooklyn has plunged deep into craft spirits, with eight distilleries opening in just the last 21/2 years. The tiny but mighty liquor store called Dry Dock in Red Hook (next to Fairway) is a prime destination for bottles from them all. Try a flask of this "white lightning" from Kings County Distillery, the borough's first, in a white Manhattan (see recipe on F4 )
NEWS
December 23, 2012
Exotic Italian ales are the hottest new trend in craft beer. Turns out it's actually an old one, too - about 2,800 years old. That's the age of drinking vessels unearthed from Etruscan tombs and analyzed for trace ingredients by Pat McGovern, the molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum who's been a frequent collaborator on reimagining such "Ancient Ales" with Dogfish Head Brewery's Sam Calagione. Birra Etrusca is the spectacular result of their recent jaunt, a recipe collaboration with Italian brewers Baladin and Birra del Borgo.
NEWS
June 19, 2005 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER FOOD CRITIC
The SS Dogfish, to most casual observers, is little more than a red rubber dinghy. And despite the bright spring sunshine that beamed down upon the Lewes Canal near the Delaware shore, it was still rather waterlogged with rain. To Dogfish Head brewer Sam Calagione, however, whose new book, Brewing Up a Business (Wiley, $24.95), details his unorthodox entrepreneurial rise, great journeys have always begun in tiny wet vessels. And this boat, docked just outside his Brewmaster's Suite at the Inn at Canal Square, was poised for a cruise to the farthest ends of his growing empire of beer.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
A FRIENDLY disagreement on Twitter spawned a race between a $78,000 sports car and an Amtrak express train. If only every Twitter debate could be so productive. Road vs. Rails chronicled the 440-mile journey yesterday of Amtrak's high-speed Acela and a 2014 Porsche Panamara from Boston to Washington, D.C., on social media. Transit advocate and graphicmachine partner Matt Staub traveled for Team Train while car enthusiast and eCommerce manager Kris Nielsen drove for Team Porsche.
NEWS
December 12, 2014
IT'S JUST A WAFFLE, but Brian and Andrea Polizzi's newest product is the next step in the maturation of American small brewing. The couple's 13-month-old, West-Chester-based company, Waffatopia, last month unveiled Sweet & Stormy, a ready-to-heat waffle flavored with Victory Storm King Imperial Stout . The waffle is sweet and chocolaty and, even if it doesn't contain a trace of alcohol, it's probably not on my breakfast diet. But that's not the point. What catches my eye is the waffle package's familiar, blue-and-red V-for-Victory logo - a sign that, after successfully carving a niche in the beer biz over the past 18 years, the Downingtown brewery's brand is strong enough to carry more than sixpacks.
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