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Dollar Coin

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NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Henri Sault, Inquirer Coins Writer
Encouraged by Canada's apparently successful movement toward replacing dollar bills with its new dollar coin, Congress is considering legislation that would create the Columbus commemorative dollar coin. The legislation in Congress is based on the premise that a dollar coin, designed to remain in service for 20 years or more, would save about $115 million a year. The chief supporters of the legislation are, predictably, representatives of the vending-machine industry, transit systems, metal producers and casino owners.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1997 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
Circulating coinage hasn't changed much for a generation. The Susan B. Anthony dollar was introduced in 1979, but can scarcely be said to have circulated. The quarter was given a new reverse during the Bicentennial. Otherwise, dimes, nickels and cents have remained the same. That stability will make 1998 all the more interesting. The new year will see the appearance of the newly authorized dollar coin, a gold-looking, smooth-edged coin meant to replace the dollar bill. Under legislation approved late this year, quarters will appear with reverses designed to celebrate each of the 50 states and probably the District of Columbia and the island territories.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1999 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
As the United States moves seriously toward replacing the dollar bill with a coin, Canada's experience offers new insights. Canada dropped its paper dollars in favor of the yellow metal "loon," the dollar coin bearing an image of the waterbird. The loon is distinctive enough to avoid confusion with other coins, and was accepted with little protest. The Royal Canadian Mint cited considerable savings in the use of a long-lived coin over paper currency, which frequently has to be replaced.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1999 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
Metallurgists at the U.S. mint are working up to the deadline to develop the brass-colored alloy that will let the new Sacagawea dollar coin avoid user confusion and work in coin-operated vending machines. The design of the coin, to be put in circulation in 2000, depicts the Indian woman with her infant son, Jean-Baptiste, on her back. She guided the Lewis and Clark expedition to the Pacific Ocean in 1804-06. The Sacagawea design is by Glenna Goodacre of Santa Fe. The reverse, a soaring eagle with 17 stars, denoting the number of states at the time of the expedition, is by mint sculptor Thomas D. Rogers Sr. The new coin will be the same size as the Susan B. Anthony dollar, but will be yellow and will have a smooth edge and a wider rim. The Anthony dollar, issued in 1979, failed to gain widespread acceptance because it was easily mistaken for a quarter.
NEWS
June 5, 1999 | By Geneva Overholser
So now we womenfolk get another face on a dollar coin. I wonder how she'll fare? By early next year, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea's image will be in circulation, replacing the Susan B. Anthony coin, which debuted 20 years ago to near-unanimous hoots and howls. Sacajawea will have at least one advantage: Golden in color and smooth of rim, this coin will be harder to confuse with the quarter. Still, you wouldn't want to bet the farm on Sacajawea's success- and not just because Americans don't seem much taken with dollar coins.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2000 | by Myung Oak Kim, and Ericka Bennett, Daily News Staff Writers
They're shiny, golden-hued and slightly larger than a quarter. More than 700 million of them have reached the hands of Americans. But you'd almost never know it through daily transactions. The new Golden Dollar coin has done a great disappearing act since its release six months ago. Many folks have yet to see the smooth-edged coin bearing the image of Shoshone Indian translator Sacagawea, the guide who acted as interpreter for the Lewis and Clark expedition. Most folks who have gotten their hands on the coin aren't letting go. Instead of using them in everyday cash transactions, people are storing the coins away in jars or drawers at home.
NEWS
April 24, 1995
As the U.S. dollar takes a beating against the yen and the Deutsche mark, it's under a different kind of attack in Washington. To save money, the familiar greenback may be replaced by a new $1 coin. Most average citizens oppose the idea of the nation's basic currency unit rattling around in their pockets, instead of folding into their wallets. So, predictably, do the companies and workers that produce paper dollars. But the dollar coin has one basic advantage that its detractors cannot refute: It would save money.
NEWS
November 19, 1999 | By John Woestendiek, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's first "golden dollar" was struck at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia yesterday amid hoopla, pomp, and promises that the coin would not be a flop like its predecessor. And this time the Mint is putting its money where its mouth is, with a massive public-relations campaign: $40 million worth of television and print advertising, and promotional gimmicks that include placing the dollars in - yes, it's true - boxes of Cheerios. The Mint hopes to ensure that the coin - depicting the young Native American woman who guided Lewis and Clark - does not meet the same fate as the misunderstood, roundly criticized (though not quite round)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2001 | By Henri Sault, FOR THE INQUIRER
Never having been offered a Sacagawea dollar in change, except from a train-ticket vending machine, I asked Federal Reserve Bank people about the coin's availability and acceptance. The bank's St. Louis branch has studied the situation, and concluded that the coin is used less than the Susan B. Anthony dollar was a year after its issue in 1979. That surprised me, because people talk about the new gold-colored dollar, and many have samples at home. Banks have them on their counters, and I see them in markets and stores such as Kmart and Kohl's.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR
There is a bill (House Bill 1068) that deserves universal backing, and this happens about once every 1,000 years. It is called the United States Coinage Reform Act of l989. And what it would do for us is to give us a beautiful metal dollar. WARNING! We must not, once again, endure the catastrophic experience of dear old Susan B. Anthony. When finally Congress and the Treasury Department issued a dollar coin in l979, everyone sat back, expecting the revolution to happen. The vending machine merchants invested millions of dollars to fit out their equipment to accept the new dollar.
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NEWS
October 7, 2013
Two bits for $1 coin What former Treasury Department aide Aaron Klein does not tell us is that any new dollar coin will be identical in size, weight, and heft to the old dollar coin ("Switch to $1 coins," Sept. 30). In other words, it will feel just like a quarter - and that's why it will fail again. People (my family comes to mind) will inadvertently spend them as quarters, and thus become resentful. Shortly thereafter, the coins will stop circulating and disappear again. The other thing Klein does not tell us is that the reason the $1 coin will look and feel like the quarter is that the vending machine industry, not the American public, demands it. Better to make a dollar coin that looks and feels like the old half-dollar piece.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA wants your money, but not your dollars. SEPTA general manager Joseph Casey is urging Pennsylvania's two senators to support federal legislation to do away with the dollar bill. Dollar coins are much cheaper for SEPTA to handle, since they are counted by machines instead of humans. "The cost to SEPTA to process 1,000 notes is three and a half times greater than to process 1,000 coins," Casey said in a letter to U.S. Sens. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D., Pa.) and Patrick J. Toomey (R., Pa.)
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
La Salle University math teacher Stephen Andrilli usually spends his days thinking about an infinite amount of numbers, but today he's thinking of only one: Eleven. "It's on everybody's mind," he said. And by everybody, he means people from mathematicians to spiritualists to doomsday cultists. Today is Nov. 11, 2011, or 11/11/11, a turn of the calendar that won't come again for 100 years. One may be the loneliest number, Andrilli said, but 11 ranks among the most odd - and not just because it isn't even.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
La Salle University math teacher Stephen Andrilli usually spends his days thinking about an infinite amount of numbers, but on Friday he'll be thinking of only one: Eleven. "It's on everybody's mind," he said. And by everybody, he means people from mathematicians to spiritualists to doomsday cultists. Friday is Nov. 11, 2011, or 11/11/11, a turn of the calendar that won't come again for 100 years. One may be the loneliest number, Andrilli said, but 11 ranks among the most odd - and not just because it isn't even.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It looks as if the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia may have made a doozy of a mistake with the George Washington dollar coins it started producing last month. An unknown number of the golden coins - possibly thousands - left the mint without the much-vaunted lettering on the edge that was supposed to proclaim: "In God We Trust . . . E Pluribus Unum . . . P 2007. " As a result, some coin enthusiasts have dubbed them "godless dollars. " More literal-minded numismatists are calling them "missing-edge-lettering" coins.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Scott Pruden
The recent news that SEPTA, our regional monument to obsolescence and obstinacy, decided to remove its much-maligned orange ticket machines from Regional Rail platforms at Center City train stations saddened me a bit. After all, it was within spying distance of these inscrutable devices that on many nights I derived a hefty amount of amusement at the expense of some poor soul trying to score a ticket home on the R5 line after a long evening of...
BUSINESS
February 17, 2007 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about an edgy idea. Hold up one of the new dollar coins, which debuted two days ago, and you'll see letters and numbers around the rim: "In God We Trust . . . E Pluribus Unum . . . P 2007. " The P, of course, is for the Philadelphia Mint, the world's biggest. Other features to inspire interest and acceptance: a big "$1" on the back (other coins spell out amounts). Presidents on the front, a new one every three months. The Statue of Liberty on the back. Both debut images are by Philadelphia designers.
NEWS
December 4, 2006
Paper trail needed Imagine if your bank refused to provide receipts for automatic-teller transactions. Imagine if it said: "Trust us - your deposit was recorded correctly. " You'd probably change banks. What about our democracy? Millions of citizens this year cast electronic votes without any paper trail to back them up. No audits are possible. There are already consequences: A Florida congressman was declared a winner by less than 400 votes in a race in which 18,000 voters somehow did not cast a vote for either candidate.
NEWS
January 3, 2003 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
The Royal Canadian Mint has struck a good-luck charm to launch the new year. The 2003 maple-leaf silver-bullion dollar carries a hologram that contains an imaginative maple leaf and a Chinese privy mark that means "the maple leaf will bring you good fortune. " The obverse is Dora de Pedery-Hunt's portrait of Queen Elizabeth. The 99.9 fine silver coin is available only from the mint at $26.45. The good-luck coin is one of three holographic coins struck by the mint. The others are a 15th-anniversary coin showing the loon, the bird on the dollar coin, and the platinum five-coin set. Both are dated 2002.
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