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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
If you happen to live or work in a dining wasteland, as I once did, it helps to pray to the food gods for an accidental restaurant row to appear. One day, you're eating drippy burritos and chicken Caesar salads from a lunch truck. Then - poof! - the next day you're slurping uni-topped oysters alongside sizzling stone bowls of bibimbap in a room of spa-like tranquillity. The recent arrival of Doma - and its tasty neighbors on the suddenly bustling dining strip of Callowhill Street - proves that such miraculous things can happen in an unlikely place.
NEWS
September 16, 1996 | BY MORRIS THOMPSON
I was 19 and a painfully sincere college sophomore that spring of 1972 when I confided that I'm gay to more dear friends than anyone ever has. My sister, 11 years older, said the news was easy to accept, having known me since before I was. But she didn't know how she'd react if her 3 1/2-year-old son were my age and saying the same thing. It's a reality most gays and lesbians live with: Even those who try their best to love us unconditionally may have places within them where they see us as children of a lesser god. So unlike some number of politically - and maybe even socially - naive gay and lesbian activists, I'm not surprised or freshly wounded by the Defense of Marriage Act (DoMA)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
If you have three young children and a restaurant, you'd think your life was busy enough. But when Robert and Patti Moon, who have owned Shiroi Hana, in Center City, since 1995, sent the last toddler to Montessori school, they figured it was time to nurture another restaurant. Located on what is becoming a nice stretch of diverse eateries on Callowhill Street, Doma opened its doors about a month ago. This is a more casual venue than Shiroi Hana and offers an interesting menu of cold and hot appetizers that are perfect plates for sharing.
NEWS
January 7, 2009 | By Bob Barr
In 1996, as a freshman member of the House of Representatives, I wrote the Defense of Marriage Act, better known by its acronym, DOMA. The law has been a flash-point for those arguing for or against same-sex marriage ever since President Bill Clinton signed it into law. Even President-elect Barack Obama has grappled with its language, meaning and impact. I can sympathize with the incoming commander-in-chief. And, after long and careful consideration, I have come to agree with him that the law should be repealed.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
People were shocked - shocked! - across the country on Wednesday, after the Obama administration announced that it had deemed the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional. The administration's move reignited the long-simmering debate over whether the government should recognize gay marriages. Talk-show hosts have been irate. Some of your neighbors and co-workers have been arguing loudly. Perhaps some of your family members aren't on speaking terms any longer. And perhaps you've been feeling left out because you don't know what all the hullabaloo is about.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
They met at a birthday party in 1990, were instantly smitten, and, after years of transatlantic romancing, got married in California in 2008. Today, they have four adopted children, ages 6 to 11, and a comfortable home in Harrisburg. But a sword of Damocles hangs over the couple, only one of whom is an American citizen. The other is French, and vulnerable to deportation. Under federal immigration law, married binational couples usually can fix this precarious situation with a family reunification petition, seeking a green card for the foreign-born spouse.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Sudhin Thanawala, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Gays and lesbians are not entitled to the same heightened legal protection and scrutiny against discrimination as racial minorities and women in part because they are far from politically powerless and have ample ability to influence lawmakers, lawyers for a U.S. House group said in a federal court filing. The filing Friday in San Francisco's U.S. District Court comes in the case of a lesbian federal employee's lawsuit claiming the government wrongly denied health coverage to her same-sex spouse.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Defense Department is not extending some housing benefits to same-sex partners of service members even though it legally could because the complex issue requires more review and has triggered concerns among military leaders, senior Pentagon officials said Monday. A department memo detailed a number of other benefits that will be extended to same-sex partners, including identification cards that will provide access to commissaries and other services. But Pentagon officials said that while some housing payments and health benefits can't be included because of federal law, some access to base housing is not specifically prohibited and could be offered in the future.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
"I believe the Supreme Court's ruling on DOMA was a critical step in strengthening equal rights for all. " - U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D. Pa.) "Every American should have equal rights under the law, including the legal right to marry who they love and are committed to. " - U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz (D., Pa.), who is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor "The . . . ruling is now the law of the land. While the national debate over marriage will continue, it is appropriate that legally married same-sex couples receive equal treatment and benefits under the law. " - U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R., N.J.)
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
CAN NINE men and women in thick black robes jump onto a fast-moving train? That's the challenge facing the U.S. Supreme Court after two days of historic arguments this week on whether to remove some or possibly all of the barriers to same-sex marriage. Although the high court hearings echoed the history of the landmark rulings on civil rights for blacks and other minority groups in the 20th Century, there was a huge difference. Polls have shown a huge and rapid reversal in public opinion on gay marriage since the laws in question - the federal 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, and California's Proposition 8 from 2008 - were enacted.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a federal lawsuit that could have national resonance, a lesbian couple legally married in Massachusetts is challenging the Pennsylvania law that refuses to recognize their union. The suit, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, was brought by Cara Palladino and Isabelle Barker, who were married in Northampton, Mass. in February 2005 then moved to Pennsylvania six months later. The couple, now living in Philadelphia, work at Bryn Mawr College and have a 4-year-old son. Rather than a full-on attack of the heart of Pennsylvania's Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA)
NEWS
August 27, 2013
A FEW DAYS before its 50th anniversary, we think of the March on Washington, and the civil-rights movement that it embodied, as a triumph of democracy. In the grand sense, this is true. Protest is by no means exclusive to democracies, but it's more at home in a democratic system than any other. The civil-rights movement extended the promise of democracy to many who had been denied it. But there were also aspects of the movement's victories that could be spun as undemocratic. Many Southern whites decried the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as an imposition of external values on the majorities of residents in their states (the internal value they were protecting, of course, was the right to discriminate)
NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - A Superior Court judge said Thursday that it would be at least September before she decides on a motion filed by couples seeking to legalize same-sex marriages in New Jersey following recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings. Attorneys for the couples took aim at the state's civil union laws Thursday in Trenton, telling Judge Mary C. Jacobson that they were preventing their clients from receiving federal benefits they would be entitled to if same-sex marriages were permitted. The key question that Jacobson must answer is whether the civil union laws violate the state constitution's equal protection mandate because they do not provide for certain benefits at the federal level, which are reserved for married heterosexual and homosexual couples.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
GROWING UP, I was taught that some things were non-negotiable: Mass was one. The 10 p.m. summer curfew was another. Making the bed, kissing the over-perfumed relatives without a grimace and Lawrence Welk on Saturday nights were still others. But the thing that sticks out in my mind like the brightest star in a constellation, the single most important lesson taught to me by a father who seemed to sense his time was limited so he had to rush, was the absolute and uncompromising mandate that his children be honorable.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
SO KING Samir Shabazz clearly and freely states that "black people should create militias to exterminate whites, skin them alive, pour acid on them, sic pit bulls on them, bust their heads with rocks and raid nurseries to kill everything white in sight," and said he "would love nothing more than to come home with a cracker's head in his book bag. " He preaches his hate-filled racist rhetoric on Philly street corners with not a hint of backlash....
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
Under the Defense of Marriage Act, the federal government does not recognize same-sex marriages even in states that have legalized it. Last week, the Supreme Court ruled DOMA unconstitutional. There are two possible grounds, distinct and in some ways contradictory, for doing so. The curious thing about the court's DOMA decision is that it contains both rationales. The first is federalism. Marriage is the province of the states. Each state decides who is married and who is not. The federal government may not intrude.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Robert Barnes, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - An extraordinary finale to a history-making term once again revealed the Supreme Court to be Washington's most unpredictable institution. Or at least that's how it must appear. One day's decision left essentially untouched the court's controversial permission to let race play some role in college admissions. It was followed the next day by a decision overruling Congress and striking down the heart of the Voting Rights Act, which has protected minority voters for nearly half a century.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
THE Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act yesterday as an unconstitutional denial of the liberty guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment. But it was not a day to celebrate the court - not after Tuesday's Voting Rights Act atrocity. We already knew that the U.S. has checks and balances in place to defend minority groups against the tyranny of the majority; the question is whether they're used. "Sometimes" isn't good enough. Yesterday was, however, a day to celebrate, by cheering the heroic progress of a just and moral movement for equality.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
IT CERTAINLY is crowded down here at the bottom of history's dustbin. There's very little breathing space, what with those of us who reject a woman's right to destroy the child growing within her body, those who believe that religious principles deserve respect in the face of overbearing health-care mandates and those who consider starving someone to death because they're in a so-called "vegetative state" to be a criminal act, not an act of mercy....
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Allison Steele and Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writers
Rae Theodore learned of Wednesday's Supreme Court decisions by refreshing a legal-news blog on her computer, over and over. She had read predictions that the justices would send the cases back, so when the announcements flashed, she had to read the words several times before they sank in. "I was shocked. I wasn't prepared for it," said Theodore, 46, a business writer from Royersford, Montgomery County, who had a commitment ceremony with her partner in 2011. "Honestly, I didn't think it would affect me that much, because it doesn't change the fact that I can't be legally married here.
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