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Domain Names

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NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Alicia A. Caldwell INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For many people, the answer to the eternal quandary of how to get rich quick lies in the tiny computer dots on their lotto tickets. For Charles Ziegler, the answer to finding a windfall is far more complicated than a simple series of lucky numbers. Ziegler, 43, anticipates finding his pot of gold by buying Internet domain names - the popular, famous, sometimes infamous - and auctioning them to the highest bidder. He bought AndreaPiaYates.com after the Houston mother was arrested and charged with drowning her five children.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2002 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Timothy Lee prompted some head-scratching two years ago when he said he turned down $8 million cash and $30 million in stock for the "cool.com" Web address that he had registered years earlier for free. Today, for lack of funding, the Cool.com site that Lee, of Seattle, tried to build into a Web community for teenagers is a virtual ghost town. Its assets, including the once-hot domain name, await any interested bidder. The market for simple, catchy dot-com names sure isn't what it used to be. Speculators who scarf up Internet domain names - the part of a Web address after the "www" - to resell for profit say top prices have fallen about 90 percent since the dot-com go-go era. Gone is the craziness of the late 1990s, when business.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Dot-restaurant will debut next month, following on the heels of dot-city, dot-organic, dot-rich, and even - dare we say it? - dot-WTF. So before you suddenly notice how the digital landscape has shifted and utter that bemused (and unprintable) expression yourself, here's an update on what's happening. Yes, there's an Internet land rush underway, pretty much as predicted when the Net's overseers decided three years ago to allow a huge expansion of "generic top-level domains. " The result?
NEWS
January 30, 2001 | By Kathryn Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Swiss businessman and author has sued a Harleysville man in federal court, claiming the man is a "cybersquatter" who registers the names of individuals and companies as Internet domain names to make money by selling them later. Stephan Schmidheiny, who last year was listed among Forbes magazine's top 322 richest individuals in the world, wants the domain name of www.schmidheiny.com back from Steven Weber. According to the suit filed on Wednesday, Weber registered the name in June through his Ohio-based Internet company Famology.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the folks at Wyndmoor-based Irish Edition found the Web address for their 15,000-circulation monthly cultural newspaper taken over by a porn site, they scrambled to find out what had happened. They discovered this: There is a growing market for discarded dot-com domain names, and online opportunists had purchased the newspaper's address last month after Irish Edition had inadvertently let its own dot-com claim lapse. In a peculiar development in online commerce, the rush to register an ever-dwindling supply of catchy domain names has fueled a rush for expired Web addresses.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Looking for a good time? Check out the township's Web site. The Lower Bucks municipality has joined the ranks of thousands of cyber-jacking victims, including the White House. Its Internet home has been turned into a porn palace. Bensalem's director of administration, William G. McCauley 3d, said the township lost the site because the company that registers it, Network Solutions, never informed it that its domain name was going to expire. Brian O'Shaughnessy, spokesman for the Mountain View, Calif.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In one of the first actions to enforce a new law to police the Internet, a federal judge yesterday ordered a Bucks County man to shut down Web sites that allegedly profit illegally from a Michigan cartoonist's trademark. U.S. District Judge Stewart Dalzell invoked the Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, which President Clinton signed in November to protect trademarks online. Congress passed the law in response to cybersquatting - speculating in, or capitalizing on, Internet addresses, known as domain names.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2000 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the Internet, you can think you have it all - a Web page, an e-mail account or two, and maybe even a list of sexy online pseudonyms for use in the chat rooms. But you still could be a cyber dud without your very own custom dot-com address, as in "yahoo.com" or "yournamehere.com," that Net surfers can type into the browser, usually after the "www. " That is the pitch, anyway, from a growing number of services that help customers find and reserve Internet addresses, otherwise known as domain names.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | By Rory J. O'Connor and Larry Williams, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration proposed yesterday that a nonprofit corporation be set up to manage the booming Internet, replacing government oversight of the global computer network. The administration hopes to establish the enterprise as early as September as part of a continuing effort to remove the government from what began as a Defense Department project in the 1960s. While lots of Internet fundamentals are likely to change in coming months - from new address "domain" names to a new system for management - the goal is to keep the system simple for most users while avoiding chaos on the increasingly complex network.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark Epstein was something of a computer nerd growing up outside of Wilkes-Barre. He had an Atari 1200 personal computer in his room, wrote some games, and helped a doctor computerize his office. Epstein, now 26, has another special job involving computers. In February, he was hired as the law gun for Internet matters at Blank Rome Comisky & McCauley, one of Philadelphia's top firms. It was shortly after Epstein graduated from law school that he noticed how people really liked going online with the Internet and he realized this could be gold mine in legal fees.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 17, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Dot-restaurant will debut next month, following on the heels of dot-city, dot-organic, dot-rich, and even - dare we say it? - dot-WTF. So before you suddenly notice how the digital landscape has shifted and utter that bemused (and unprintable) expression yourself, here's an update on what's happening. Yes, there's an Internet land rush underway, pretty much as predicted when the Net's overseers decided three years ago to allow a huge expansion of "generic top-level domains. " The result?
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union disappeared from the map more than two decades ago. But online, an "e-vil empire" is thriving. Security experts say the ".su" Internet suffix assigned to the USSR in 1990 has turned into a haven for hackers, who have flocked to the defunct superpower's domain space to send spam and steal money. Capitalist concerns rather than communist nostalgia explain the move. "I don't think that this is really a political thing," Oren David, a manager at security firm RSA's antifraud unit, said.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
ALLYSON SCHWARTZ used to be known as "Sen. Scarf. " This was during her days in the state Senate, where she served 14 years, and - as you likely figured out - almost always wore a scarf. These days, during her fifth term in Congress, she's wearing something else: a change of heart for a chance to make history. In November, even December, Schwartz seemed certain that she wouldn't challenge Tom Corbett for governor. Now she seems certain that she will. "It is my intention," she tells me, to give up her House seat and take on T.C. Why the change?
BUSINESS
June 30, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Stand aside, dot-com, king of the Web's early years. The realm of top-level domains, fiefdoms that also include dot-net, dot-edu, dot-org, and dot-gov, is about to get much more populous. The dramatic rise in the number of new fiefdoms won't begin until 2013. But as the landscape starts to take shape in the coming months, you can expect some fascinating battles for brand-new turf - potentially valuable property created from whole cloth by the nonprofit corporation that oversees the Internet's naming system.
NEWS
February 26, 2007 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Broomell thinks Cherry Hill Dodge sucks. At least that's what the magnetic signs he stuck to his vehicle say. Charles Foulke, the owner of Cherry Hill Dodge and several other well-known local dealerships, would disagree. So much so that he filed a lawsuit against Broomell, accusing him of hurting his business by displaying the signs, among other indiscretions. While some people would have sought a quiet resolution for what began as a sputtering pickup truck, Broomell wouldn't quit.
SPORTS
November 2, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
North and South Korea have agreed in principle to form a unified team for the 2008 Beijing Olympics and next year's Asian Games, and now all that remains is to work out the details. The nations issued a joint, three-paragraph statement yesterday declaring their intention to field one team. The statement followed a 3-hour meeting between North and South Korean Olympic officials in the Chinese territory of Macau, where their teams were competing in the East Asian Games. The two sides have long talked about combining sports forces, but their statement marked a formal step toward that goal.
NEWS
December 11, 2003 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Zuccarini, an Internet outlaw who eluded federal authorities for years, admitted in court yesterday that he made money by luring minors to porn sites with misspellings of popular Web pages for children. Zuccarini, 56, formerly of Andalusia, Bucks County, and Westmont, N.J., pleaded guilty to 50 federal charges - the first person in the country convicted under the 2003 Truth in Domain Names Act. Before admitting that he intentionally deceived minors into logging onto adult sites containing graphic sexual scenes, Zuccarini broke down in tears.
NEWS
October 5, 2003 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Zuccarini must not have seen them coming. After all, he had eluded his pursuers for three years, escaping armies of lawyers and process servers with their court orders, their lawsuits, their million-dollar judgments against his online empire. Just as he had disappeared from his homes in the Philadelphia suburbs in 2000, surely he would have slipped out of that Florida beachfront hotel on Sept. 3 and vanished again, to continue tormenting them from the Internet. Since 1998, he had been hijacking unsuspecting Web surfers to his maze of enticements for pornography, credit cards and computer games.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2002 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Jan. 1, some traffic in the virtual world will be directed to a local way station: Horsham. On that day, Afilias Ltd., an Irish company whose U.S. offices are in Horsham, will begin to maintain the Internet registry of domain names that end in .org. Domain names are akin to telephone numbers. They are unique worldwide identifiers of the people or entities that possess them. In fact, each domain name really masks a unique and long combination of numbers that would be impossible to remember let alone associate with specific individuals or groups such as the Red Cross.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Looking for a good time? Check out the township's Web site. The Lower Bucks municipality has joined the ranks of thousands of cyber-jacking victims, including the White House. Its Internet home has been turned into a porn palace. Bensalem's director of administration, William G. McCauley 3d, said the township lost the site because the company that registers it, Network Solutions, never informed it that its domain name was going to expire. Brian O'Shaughnessy, spokesman for the Mountain View, Calif.
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