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NEWS
February 28, 1988
Night baseball is coming to Chicago's Wrigley Field, the last major-league ballpark where the boys of summer kept the game an afternoon affair. When the lights go up this summer, the Cubs will thus shed one of their two distinguishing attributes (the other being a tendency not to win). Now some see in this the End of Baseball As We Knew It, and they are right. Others, those sly victors, use phrases like "20th century" and "anachronism" and "inevitability. " The actual battle before Chicago's City Council pitted neighborhood prerogative (if you lived virtually next door, as a great number do in Chicago, would you want a stadiumful of people clotting the night streets?
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Red dome at night, commuter take flight. White dome at dusk, raincoats a must. Blue dome till dawn, clouds all gone. Who knows what new sayings may be inspired by the blinking dome of the New Jersey State Aquarium. For nearly two years, it has predicted the next day's weather with solid red, white and blue lights - 220 of them lighting up the 38-foot-wide dome. Red for storms, white for clouds, and blue for sunny skies. Red blinking lights warned of severe storms. But come 11:15 p.m. tonight, you won't miss the aquarium weather report - if you're along the waterfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  UNDER THE DOME . 10 p.m. Mondays, CBS3. MAYBE you knew all along that Dale "Barbie" Barbara would cheat death on CBS' "Under the Dome" last night. Mike Vogel had a few bad moments, though, before his character's time on the gallows. "Dome" showrunner Neal Baer called him last year and said, " 'OK, the finale's going to be fantastic. It's fantastic. This, this and this happens and this happens. And then we hang you,' " recalled Vogel in an interview last week. "And I waited.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | BY GEORGE MCNAMARA
Here, in the City of Philadelphia, I honestly do not think you could find anyone with more of an appreciation than I of our historical significance. I have read the books, studied the background and visited the shrines hundreds of times. I am a Philadelphian who knows where the Liberty Bell is, and looks forward to being asked directions. Impressive as the 200th anniversary of our Constitution is, I am underwhelmed by the celebration plans, especially the major silliness of a domed pavilion near Independence Hall.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1990 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 40-story office tower and retail complex may one day loom behind "the Dome" at Broad and Chestnut Streets under plans being discussed by the companies that own the property. After five years of planning and buying up land on Chestnut Street, Berwind Realty Services Inc. said it had asked Mellon Bank to become involved in its plans to develop the block that the two companies own on Chestnut Street between Broad and 15th Streets. The two companies are in preliminary talks about Berwind's plans to build a high-rise office tower at 15th and Chestnut Streets and connect it with a public walkway to One Mellon Bank Center at Broad and Chestnut.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There is nothing like a dome. Especially when it's as soaring and serene as the one that spans the Chinese rotunda at the Renaissance-style Penn Museum. The tiled canopy rests as lightly as a soap bubble on the walls of the rotunda, 90 feet above our heads, and the spare, unadorned walls make us feel as if we were entering an ancient sanctuary. When this section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology opened on South Street in 1916, visitors marveled at the structure's gravity-defying grace and openness.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the 15 years that he has lived close to the township's public-works yard, Donald Richardson has never been too upset about looking out his front door and seeing a mulch pile that rises above a chain-link fence with heavy machinery leaning against it. "At least you could see a horizon of trees," Richardson said. Not for much longer. Despite the vehement objections of neighborhood residents, the township Board of Commissioners decided Monday night to continue construction of a 33- foot-high dome for the storage of street salt in the yard.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* 112 WEDDINGS. 9 tonight, HBO. * UNDER THE DOME. 10 tonight, CBS3.   DOCUMENTARY filmmakers tend not to make Michael Bay money, so for years Doug Block ("51 Birch Street," "The Kids Grow Up") supplemented his income by producing cinema verite-style videos for couples getting married. "It's hard to resist getting swept up in it all," Block says in "112 Weddings," which premieres tonight on HBO. "A few weeks later, I send out their videos and I never see them again.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | By David Goldstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In 1792, President George Washington and his secretary of state, Thomas Jefferson, were in Philadelphia, pondering a question of extreme symbolic importance: The design of the U.S. Capitol. Determined to send a message that, although a fledgling democracy, America commanded respect, Washington decided upon a dome. "It gives beauty and grandeur to the pile [building]," he wrote. Now, the world's most visible symbol of democracy is getting a face-lift, a $30 million repair job that will seal cracks and other problems in the 135-year-old, cast-iron dome.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When city firefighters rushed to the Statehouse on March 21, 1885, flames were illuminating its windows. But a cold snap had frozen the fire hydrants, and it took 15 precious minutes to thaw the plugs out. The delay was crucial. In a photograph taken after the fire, children wrapped in huge scarves shiver before the gutted Statehouse shell. The roof had fallen in. The walls had cracked. A nearby tree looked like a delicate glass sculpture, encased in frozen water from the fire hoses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
CHILDHOOD'S END. 8 tonight, Tuesday and Wednesday, Syfy. Can science fiction and religion co-exist? Mike Vogel doesn't see why not. "I think God created us with an imagination, and for me, science fiction, it's the ultimate in opening the expanse of what's possible," said the Warminster-raised star of "Childhood's End. " The three-night miniseries premieres tonight on Syfy. Vogel, who spent some time at the Christian Philadelphia College of Bible (now Cairn University)
TRAVEL
November 16, 2015 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
BUCHAREST, Romania - This isn't the first city Americans think of visiting on a European vacation. During the Iron Curtain years, Romania was an elusory country known for turning out Olympic gymnasts and for steering an independent, yet totalitarian, course from the rest of the Soviet Bloc. Tourism was not a priority. The breach of the Berlin Wall in 1989 set off a chain of relatively peaceful transitions to freedom through most of Eastern Europe. Romania, however, endured violent protests in which more than 1,000 people were killed, leading to the Christmas Day execution of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
High above all the merriment and learning of the Please Touch Museum, in the chamber between the inner and outer domes that cap Memorial Hall, you can't hear any children playing. The only sound is a distant train whistle - and, at certain inopportune times, flowing water. Once, when the museum was rented for a wedding, building engineer Hosea Brawley had to go up to the chamber and balance buckets on cast-iron beams to catch the leaks. Despite undergoing a recent extensive renovation, Memorial Hall has suffered damage to both the plaster work and the floor from water intrusion.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
There is nothing like a dome. Especially when it's as soaring and serene as the one that spans the Chinese rotunda at the Renaissance-style Penn Museum. The tiled canopy rests as lightly as a soap bubble on the walls of the rotunda, 90 feet above our heads, and the spare, unadorned walls make us feel as if we were entering an ancient sanctuary. When this section of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology opened on South Street in 1916, visitors marveled at the structure's gravity-defying grace and openness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  UNDER THE DOME . 10 p.m. Mondays, CBS3. MAYBE you knew all along that Dale "Barbie" Barbara would cheat death on CBS' "Under the Dome" last night. Mike Vogel had a few bad moments, though, before his character's time on the gallows. "Dome" showrunner Neal Baer called him last year and said, " 'OK, the finale's going to be fantastic. It's fantastic. This, this and this happens and this happens. And then we hang you,' " recalled Vogel in an interview last week. "And I waited.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* 112 WEDDINGS. 9 tonight, HBO. * UNDER THE DOME. 10 tonight, CBS3.   DOCUMENTARY filmmakers tend not to make Michael Bay money, so for years Doug Block ("51 Birch Street," "The Kids Grow Up") supplemented his income by producing cinema verite-style videos for couples getting married. "It's hard to resist getting swept up in it all," Block says in "112 Weddings," which premieres tonight on HBO. "A few weeks later, I send out their videos and I never see them again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
SUMMER TV: It's not all about the singing and dancing anymore. Or even about the sitting around watching other people sit around - waiting for someone to say or do something incredibly inappropriate. All those remain on the menu, but it says something about how seriously some broadcasters are finally taking the cable-spurred trend toward year-round programming that when CBS Corp. CEO Leslie Moonves met with advertisers at New York's Carnegie Hall two weeks ago, the first schedule he talked about wasn't the fall's, but the summer's, reminding ad buyers that "Under the Dome" drew more viewers last summer than NBC's freshman hit "The Blacklist" did in the regular season.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
EVEN IF you've never heard of the Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Northern Liberties, chances are you've seen it: Its signature golden dome is easy to pick out on the city's skyline. But the church is much more than a pretty facade - it's one of four major hubs for the Ukrainian Catholic faith in America. Rev. Ivan Demkiv, who's steered the congregation for more than a decade, explained what happens beneath the church's brilliant dome. (Full disclosure: Demkiv is the father of one of this reporter's college friends.)
SPORTS
December 13, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
PEOPLE SAY, and tweet, the darndest things. Fox NFL Sunday co-host Terry Bradshaw, for example, didn't mince words when asked what he thought of Super Bowl XLVIII being played outdoors in Metlife Stadium, in East Rutherford, N.J. Bradshaw told WFAN in New York: "It's freakin' outside in New York, are you kidding me? Not even New York - New Jersey. It's not like Minnesota, it's a dome. It's not like it's Detroit, it's a dome. It's not like it's Indy, it's a dome . . . I don't want it to be bad, 'cause I'm there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty years ago, friends gave John Whitenight a Christmas present like no other: a Victorian glass dome with three stuffed canaries inside. He recalls the moment this way: "Boom! It was a dome explosion. " In the decades since, this retired high school art teacher has amassed about 200 of these oddly fascinating pieces, which contain artful, antique displays of flora, fauna, and food made of wax, paper, human hair, wool and muslin, feathers, seashells, and buttons. There are real animals in there, too - not just canaries, but wide-eyed monkeys and goats, huge pheasants and tiny pugs and terriers, forever preserved by the skilled taxidermists that enchanted those nutty Victorians.
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