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BUSINESS
November 6, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways and American Airlines, which are combining their frequent-flier programs, will continue to reward miles for travel based on distance flown, not fares paid. That benefits leisure travelers, who hunt for bargain fares, in contrast to business travelers, who often book expensive last-minute tickets. US Airways Dividend Miles members, who fly occasionally, won't notice much difference - they will get a new American frequent-flier number next year. US Airways' most frequent jet-setters, who log 25,000 miles or more a year, will see changes.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1996 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Anthony S. Twyman and Kurt Heine contributed to this report
You might go to the airport someday soon and get the impression that American Airlines basically owns the joint. If American Airlines buys USAir Group, more than 70 percent of Philadelphia International Airport's domestic flights would be operated by American. And for Philadelphia travelers, that could mean higher fares and, maybe, fewer flights to choose from, some airline experts say. Right now, it's far from certain that American will buy USAir. But that possibility is reportedly being discussed by American Airlines and British Airways, which appear to be on the verge of a major trans-Atlantic alliance.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Looking to boost revenue and attract international travelers, US Airways on Wednesday began offering first-class style meals for coach customers on flights to Europe, the Middle East and South America - for $19.99. Travelers will have to order the premium meals at least 24 hours in advance, US Airways said. They can select either a vegetarian or chicken meal. Philadelphia's dominant airline said it would also offer free wine with the meals. At the same time, the airline said it would no longer accept cash for on-board purchases on international or domestic flights.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Congressional agreement on his proposal to ban smoking on virtually all domestic airline fights is "a milestone in the effort to protect the health of nonsmokers," Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.) said yesterday. The agreement, reached by Senate and House negotiators late Monday night, would ban smoking on all flights within the continental United States and any domestic flights lasting less than six hours. The ban would extend to flights to and from the U.S. territories in the Caribbean Sea. In effect, the only U.S. flights on which smoking would be allowed are those to and from Hawaii, Alaska and the U.S. territories in the Pacific Ocean, which last at least six hours.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | By Mary Ann Roser, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
Anti-smoking forces, who won a surprising victory in 1989 when Congress banned smoking on nearly all domestic flights, launched a more ambitious attack yesterday - a campaign to prohibit smoking on international flights. In announcing the latest front in the war on smoking, the Coalition on Smoking OR Health argued that smoking on flights is both a health problem and a safety hazard. The group, made up of the American Heart Association, the American Lung Association and the American Cancer Society, has enlisted the aid of former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Josh Noel and Chicago Tribune
Technology couldn't be more pervasive. It is always at our fingertips, meeting every need at every moment, providing constant communication. Right? Judging by how quickly people fire up their phones after the plane lands, not quite. One of the last significant hurdles for wireless communication is the airplane. Though WiFi is increasingly available on domestic flights, it remains expensive and relatively little-used, according to most analyses. On international flights, where it can be argued that it is most needed, WiFi remains a rarity.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
The fume-dependent seemed determined yesterday not to flinch as they ground out their butts, gritted their teeth and boarded their smokeless flights. "I'm sure it's not going to affect me," said Bob Muse of Philadelphia, who was finishing a cigarette at Philadelphia International Airport before boarding a 2 1/2-hour flight to St. Louis. "I think it's good for me. " Another businessman traveling to St. Louis on the same flight shrugged when asked how he would cope with the new smoking ban on almost all domestic flights.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
Midway Airlines, which filed for bankruptcy protection in August, then decided to close its doors after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, said $20 million was being held in reserve to refund unused passenger tickets. The airline said passengers with tickets issued by travel agencies should contact the agency for a refund. Passengers with tickets purchased directly from Midway can follow these procedures: For electronic tickets, also known as Easy Ticketing, requests for refunds can be submitted to Midway by e-mail at refunds@midwayair.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
Travelers could soon have more protection from abuse by airlines with proposed new rules to help change how passengers are treated. The Obama administration last week announced welcome new regulations designed to make airlines more customer-friendly. The changes should please frustrated passengers who have been pleading for them for years. Among other things, passengers could get up to $1,300 if bumped from an oversold flight. Currently, airlines must pay up to $800 for involuntary bumping of passengers.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
British Airways has just agreed to pump $300 million into money-losing USAir. That's good news locally because USAir is number one at the Philadelphia International Airport. But is it good for the traveling public and the airline industry? USAir and British Air say, accurately, that their partnership will help USAir compete domestically against the Big Three airlines: American, United and Delta. (The deal lowers USAir's debt and feeds British Air passengers to USAir's domestic flights.
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BUSINESS
November 6, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
US Airways and American Airlines, which are combining their frequent-flier programs, will continue to reward miles for travel based on distance flown, not fares paid. That benefits leisure travelers, who hunt for bargain fares, in contrast to business travelers, who often book expensive last-minute tickets. US Airways Dividend Miles members, who fly occasionally, won't notice much difference - they will get a new American frequent-flier number next year. US Airways' most frequent jet-setters, who log 25,000 miles or more a year, will see changes.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Joelle Farrell and Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writers
Frank Lautenberg, 89, the defiantly liberal New Jersey senator who rose from working-class roots, built a business that made him a multimillionaire and represented his home state for nearly 30 years, died Monday morning in Manhattan. Mr. Lautenberg, of Cliffside Park, N.J., was the oldest member of the Senate and the only remaining World War II veteran in the chamber. He died of complications from viral pneumonia at 4:02 a.m. at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell, his office said.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Looking to boost revenue and attract international travelers, US Airways on Wednesday began offering first-class style meals for coach customers on flights to Europe, the Middle East and South America - for $19.99. Travelers will have to order the premium meals at least 24 hours in advance, US Airways said. They can select either a vegetarian or chicken meal. Philadelphia's dominant airline said it would also offer free wine with the meals. At the same time, the airline said it would no longer accept cash for on-board purchases on international or domestic flights.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Josh Noel and Chicago Tribune
Technology couldn't be more pervasive. It is always at our fingertips, meeting every need at every moment, providing constant communication. Right? Judging by how quickly people fire up their phones after the plane lands, not quite. One of the last significant hurdles for wireless communication is the airplane. Though WiFi is increasingly available on domestic flights, it remains expensive and relatively little-used, according to most analyses. On international flights, where it can be argued that it is most needed, WiFi remains a rarity.
NEWS
June 7, 2010
Travelers could soon have more protection from abuse by airlines with proposed new rules to help change how passengers are treated. The Obama administration last week announced welcome new regulations designed to make airlines more customer-friendly. The changes should please frustrated passengers who have been pleading for them for years. Among other things, passengers could get up to $1,300 if bumped from an oversold flight. Currently, airlines must pay up to $800 for involuntary bumping of passengers.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2006 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If US Airways succeeds in acquiring rival Delta Air Lines, Philadelphia International Airport could get additional flights to Europe while also helping Southwest Airlines add domestic flights in a year or two. The merger proposal comes after US Airways Group Inc. has spent much of its energy, and more than $20 million, in recent months trying to improve its baggage service at the airport. US Airways officials say adding baggage handlers and supervisors has sharply cut the time passengers have had to wait for inbound bags this fall.
NEWS
October 7, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
Midway Airlines, which filed for bankruptcy protection in August, then decided to close its doors after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, said $20 million was being held in reserve to refund unused passenger tickets. The airline said passengers with tickets issued by travel agencies should contact the agency for a refund. Passengers with tickets purchased directly from Midway can follow these procedures: For electronic tickets, also known as Easy Ticketing, requests for refunds can be submitted to Midway by e-mail at refunds@midwayair.
NEWS
August 10, 2000
A merger between US Airways and United Airlines might be great for those two companies, but for their customers the potential costs outweigh the potential benefits. Cost is literally the problem, as passengers using Philadelphia International Airport already pay airfares 25 percent higher, on average, than people traveling the same distance from other domestic airports, according to a 1999 U.S. Department of Transportation study. A central reason is that many other cities have strong service from two, three or more airlines, thereby offering powerful competition to hold down airfares.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Priceline.com, the airline ticket source that lets Web users "bid" for airfares, recently turned one year old, marking the milestone with an announcement that on a couple of days in April it had sold more than 4,300 tickets. In the weeks since, the daily figure has surpassed 5,000. Seldom has an infant travel company generated so much buzz, using high-profile promotional methods and benefiting, too, from wide media coverage and word of mouth. In a birthday news release, the company said it had sold 330,000 tickets for leisure travelers in its first 12 months of operation, an average of 6,875 a week, and now is selling 20,000 plane tickets a week.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the restaurant's back-wall mural, the Marlboro Man is waving his coiled lariat. The shelves beside him are stocked with rows of cigarette packs. Everyone at the bar is puffing away. It's chow time at the Hitching Post, a two-week-old restaurant tucked between a newsstand and an espresso counter at Richmond International Airport, and built, not incidentally, in a city where tobacco is king and Philip Morris USA is the major private employer. Airport officials say the Hitching Post is a chap-legged stride toward a truce between smokers and nonsmokers, featuring a special ventilation system that draws smoke straight up and out of the airport.
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