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Domestic Policy

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NEWS
December 30, 1991
Less than one year after the United States rallied a worldwide coalition to defeat Saddam Hussein, U.S. politicians of every stripe want to put "America first. " The isolationist rush got into full gear with the startling upset victory of Pennsylvania Democratic Sen. Harris Wofford, who accused President Bush and his minions of ignoring America's domestic crises. Then Republican right- winger Pat Buchanan went a giant step further by announcing for the presidency on a "new nationalism" platform.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | By WALTER WILLIAMS
Give President Bush an A for picking Secretary of Transportation Samuel K. Skinner, a well-regarded politician and a proven manager, as his new chief of staff. Yet, the chief of staff position, as it did with John Sununu, can undermine the presidency and ill-serve the nation if Bush chooses the wrong chief of staff model and misuses Skinner's many talents. To be sure, Sununu's arrogance, abrasiveness and political tin ear contributed to his downfall. But the chief culprit was Bush.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Protest Trump at Penn - peacefully I assume there will be protesters at the University of Pennsylvania on May 15, considering the expected presence of Donald Trump at the School of Arts and Science's commencement ceremonies ("Penn graduation will be long on top-tier statesmen," Tuesday). They should be there to acknowledge the threat to our country posed by Trump's presidential candidacy; his domestic policy of hatred toward African Americans, Hispanics, immigrants, and women; and his foreign policy, which consists of little more than bluster and "America First" slogans.
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | By James P. Pinkerton
To the broad majority of Americans in both political parties - who are basically content with the status quo - the Bush Restoration offers little cause for alarm. The Texan's foreign policy-makers will strive to stay within the bipartisan tradition that has shaped U.S. external affairs since the 1940s. And, because Bush himself has no pretensions of independent expertise in any area except possibly U.S.-Mexico relations, he will most likely be content to check off options his advisers present.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | By DAVID S. BRODER
A dozen different factors are merging to force President Bush to face the shakeup of his high command. But the evident disarray in the White House has deeper political and intellectual roots that Bush himself is still reluctant to address. John H. Sununu has been a loyal chief of staff with a better understanding of Bush's goals and ways of working than many of his critics are willing to concede. Now, however, his high-handedness has alienated not just Bush's opponents but his friends.
NEWS
January 3, 1991
Washington wonders whether George Bush has a domestic policy agenda. Easy answer. He doesn't. Not beyond getting re-elected. Neither do the Democrats. Neither party has had a domestic policy beyond the odd burst of sloganeering since the '60s. In the '60s, presidents cared about and acted on things like children, poverty and health care for the poor. Even Richard Nixon. The Alliance for Progress and the Peace Corps were international extensions of a domestic policy in which Americans would be ambassadors for peace and prosperity in the Third World.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Chris Satullo
A fusillade of follow-up thoughts to the midterm elections: When historians get their hands on George W. Bush, they will have a festival of Oedipal analysis. W. was, by all accounts, devastated and furious when his father lost the 1992 presidential election to That Man. He brooded over how a president who had enjoyed such overwhelming popularity after a swift victory in Iraq could somehow get booted out of office the next year. When elected to the Oval Office himself, the 43d president seemed driven to avoid, at all costs, three mistakes he thought his father had made: Failing to finish the job of deposing Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By GEORGE F. WILL
In St. Louis on Sunday, whither he went in search of restored pre-eminence, the incumbent President sometimes seemed, amazingly, to be the third man, even a bystander on stage. Whatever suspense surrounded the first presidential debate leaked from it early when George Bush became defensive about his most recent attempt to put Bill Clinton on defensive. Bush began, "I said something the other day where I was accused of being like Joe McCarthy . . . . " Clinton played the Prescott Bush card (refraining from saying: "And you're no Prescott Bush . . . ")
NEWS
November 7, 1991
We switched on the national news yesterday morning, and for a moment thought we were watching the local news. The eyes of the nation were on this oft-overlooked region - and, for a change, not because something awful happened here. Democrat Harris Wofford's great upset of Dick Thornburgh was naturally the main story - a repudiation of President Bush's domestic policy, a powerful message from the nation's beleaguered middle class. But the Republican landslide in New Jersey was also big news - a repudiation, if you will, of Gov. Florio's domestic policy, a powerful message from that state's beleaguered middle class.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
At the National Constitution Center last month, former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R., Texas) told an audience that President Bush "really doesn't have a domestic policy" aside from his education program. That's the legacy of Karl Rove, who will step down later this month after 6 1/2 years as Bush's top adviser. Rove, 56, had the undeniable political genius to guide a winning presidential candidate in 2000. But then he squandered his creation by advocating divisive politics over broad-based policy at nearly every turn.
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NEWS
May 5, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Protest Trump at Penn - peacefully I assume there will be protesters at the University of Pennsylvania on May 15, considering the expected presence of Donald Trump at the School of Arts and Science's commencement ceremonies ("Penn graduation will be long on top-tier statesmen," Tuesday). They should be there to acknowledge the threat to our country posed by Trump's presidential candidacy; his domestic policy of hatred toward African Americans, Hispanics, immigrants, and women; and his foreign policy, which consists of little more than bluster and "America First" slogans.
SPORTS
September 13, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eagles coach Chip Kelly has not spoken to the team about the Ray Rice incident, although the players had discussions when they were in meetings with their position groups. Kelly said the Eagles follow the NFL's policy on domestic abuse: a six-game suspension for the first incident and a full year for a second. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell instituted that policy on Aug. 28 as a response to the two-game suspension Rice initially faced. Goodell suspended Rice indefinitely this week.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
By Ramesh Ponnuru When Mitt Romney defeated President Obama in their first debate last week, he raised the pressure on Vice President Biden to even the score in the vice presidential debate tonight. Biden will have a tough time doing that. Even though Republicans will be trying to lower expectations for their candidate, Rep. Paul Ryan, he is a formidable debater. He knows domestic policy at least as well as Biden and speaks more authoritatively about it. What's more, Biden has some predilections that will make his job harder.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Beth Fouhy, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Osama bin Laden is dead and General Motors is alive. That was Vice President Biden's message for Republican Mitt Romney in a campaign speech Thursday that blended a robust defense of President Obama's foreign policy record with a harsh attack on the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's positions. Appearing before 500 students at New York University Law School, Biden said Romney approaches foreign policy with a Cold War mentality and is uninformed about the challenges facing the United States abroad.
NEWS
December 15, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
Barack Obama has garnered praise from center to right - and has highly irritated the left - with the centrism of his major appointments. Because Obama's own beliefs remain largely opaque, his appointments have led to the conclusion that he intends to govern from the center. Obama the centrist? I'm not so sure. Take the foreign-policy team: Hillary Clinton, James Jones, and Bush holdover Robert Gates - as centrist as you can get. But the choice was far less ideological than practical.
NEWS
November 3, 2008 | By Charles Krauthammer
Last week, I made the open-and-shut case for John McCain: In a dangerous world entering an era of uncontrolled nuclear proliferation, the choice between the most-prepared foreign policy candidate in memory vs. a novice with zero experience and the wobbliest one-world instincts is not a close call. But it's all about economics and kitchen-table issues, we are told. OK. Start with economics. Neither candidate has particularly deep economic knowledge or finely honed economic instincts.
NEWS
February 22, 2008 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
PLACE: The Obama bedroom. Time: Evening. Barack Obama (BO): Precious, I think we're going to have to revise our campaign strategy a bit. Michelle Obama (MO): What do you mean? BO: Well, Sweetheart, remember when we were gloating last month about how Bill Clinton was the best thing that ever happened to our campaign? MO: You mean because he kept putting his foot in his mouth? BO: Exactly, Honeybunny. The more he yapped about race and gender and Jesse Jackson and all of that, the better we did in the polls.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
At the National Constitution Center last month, former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R., Texas) told an audience that President Bush "really doesn't have a domestic policy" aside from his education program. That's the legacy of Karl Rove, who will step down later this month after 6 1/2 years as Bush's top adviser. Rove, 56, had the undeniable political genius to guide a winning presidential candidate in 2000. But then he squandered his creation by advocating divisive politics over broad-based policy at nearly every turn.
NEWS
November 19, 2006 | By Chris Satullo
A fusillade of follow-up thoughts to the midterm elections: When historians get their hands on George W. Bush, they will have a festival of Oedipal analysis. W. was, by all accounts, devastated and furious when his father lost the 1992 presidential election to That Man. He brooded over how a president who had enjoyed such overwhelming popularity after a swift victory in Iraq could somehow get booted out of office the next year. When elected to the Oval Office himself, the 43d president seemed driven to avoid, at all costs, three mistakes he thought his father had made: Failing to finish the job of deposing Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | By John C. Goodman
President George H.W. Bush called it "the vision thing. " It's one of the factors that voters and historians use to judge a president. Presidents who show a coherent vision and strive for "big ideas" are usually viewed well by at least the latter, if not by both sets of judges. Since 9/11, discussion of the current President Bush's vision has been primarily limited to foreign policy and the Bush doctrine of "preemption. " But while foreign policy has legitimately dominated, President Bush has quietly pieced together a domestic policy vision that has just as much chance to be revolutionary.
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